how to boost the tones of BW images.....


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#1
Hi
Most BW film shooters often use filters (yellow green, yellow etc) to improve the shades of grey (gray) in a BW film.

Shooting without filter makes the image flat ..

SO my question is,
if i convert a COLOUR digital jpeg image in PhotoShop through Image>Mode>Grayscale,

how do i boost the tones of the image (much like using those special filters for BW photography)

thanks for sharing =)
 

sk.images

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#2
1st, don't use that method. There are other better ways of doing the conversion. The one I use most of the time is the channel mixer. Create a Channel mixer layer and select monochrome, then adjust the levels to get the tones you're after... That's a start anyway...

With the channel mixer, most of detail is in the green channel, so you'll want to turn this up and the red & blue down...
 

Gunbucker

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#3
Before changing the image to grayscale, do change the color to LAB color first, and work with the brightness channel. Make a duplicate of the background, and use the duplicate to layer on top of the background using one of the mixing modes such as "screen" or "multiply", and adjust the opacity to taste.
 

student

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#4
haagen_dazs said:
Hi
Most BW film shooters often use filters (yellow green, yellow etc) to improve the shades of grey (gray) in a BW film.

Shooting without filter makes the image flat ..

SO my question is,
if i convert a COLOUR digital jpeg image in PhotoShop through Image>Mode>Grayscale,

how do i boost the tones of the image (much like using those special filters for BW photography)

thanks for sharing =)

I think you may have confused certain terms and concepts

1 Tones refer to shades/strength of grays between white an black. Tones refer to brightness, lightness, and darkness of the subject, and is determined by illumination.

One does not "boost tones". Tones can be changed by filters.

One can change contrast bewteen tones - increasing the contrast or decreasing the contrast.

Flatness of an image per se is due to a problem of illumination, of little contrast. However in B&W photography, contrast can be changed by appropriate use of filters. By "changing tones", contrast can be changed.

2 My next comments are to be taken with a pinch of salt. I am not a digital guru. But this is how I work my color images to B&W.

As mentioned by cyber_mOnkey, I go to the channels to first see the effects of using different color filters. It may be red, green or blue. Then I go to channel mixer and change to monochrome, select the filter I want to use. Then go to curves to change contrast. And finally, dodge and burn if I think it is necessary.

I do not use layers. I did not find it advantageous to work in layers. Perhaps one day I might change my mind. But I always work with a duplicate, not the original file.
 

agape01

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Feb 13, 2003
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#5
Alternatively, you might want to check out Greg Gorman's B&W conversion technique.

You're able to control the various tones in PS.
 

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#6
student said:
I do not use layers. I did not find it advantageous to work in layers. Perhaps one day I might change my mind. But I always work with a duplicate, not the original file.
Layers is better as sometimes u want to lighten your effect... it may be by changing the opacity.... or by multiplying two colors over each other like those BnW toning effects i.e. using blending modes ....

Anywayz...that was just for the layers, rest everything is cool...

thnx for sharing...
 

exhibitj

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#7
What i normally do to boost contrast for B&W:

1. Create a new layer (Ctrl J) and then put it to Overlay mode.
2. Contrast will be boosted immediately, so tweak the opacity level to taste
3. Then I conver the image to greyscale. Some prompt to flatten image appears. I normally click on the "Don't Flatten" option.

4. Then under Image.Mode>Duotone, I choose a light tone that achieves the color tone I desire. You can even go to tri-tone if you want.

5. Lastly I do an adjustment layer>Curves to do final fine-tuning.

Might sound tedious but it has worked for me so far!
 

N-user

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2006
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#9
exhibitj said:
What i normally do to boost contrast for B&W:

1. Create a new layer (Ctrl J) and then put it to Overlay mode.
2. Contrast will be boosted immediately, so tweak the opacity level to taste
3. Then I conver the image to greyscale. Some prompt to flatten image appears. I normally click on the "Don't Flatten" option.

4. Then under Image.Mode>Duotone, I choose a light tone that achieves the color tone I desire. You can even go to tri-tone if you want.

5. Lastly I do an adjustment layer>Curves to do final fine-tuning.

Might sound tedious but it has worked for me so far!

Thank bro for a good piece of knowledge... :thumbsup:
 

nickmak

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Apr 16, 2004
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#10
You could add a new channel mixer layer. Set it to monochrome and then reset all the red, green and blue channels to 0 and slowly mix in the channels to get the desired effect.
 

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