how to achieve saturated effects using film?


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edx

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#1
my shots usually turn out dull and boring.. and do not reflect the true colour... the exposure is correct and all.. but it just seems dull... how do i make it look more saturated?
 

maddog

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#2
Originally posted by edx
my shots usually turn out dull and boring.. and do not reflect the true colour... the exposure is correct and all.. but it just seems dull... how do i make it look more saturated?

what camera do u use?
 

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edx

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#6
Originally posted by Belle&Sebastain
what film do you normally use?
kodak gold 100
 

scanner

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#7
Originally posted by edx
kodak gold 100
What kind of pics you normally take?
Different brands or rather different type of films are suitable for different situation.;)
 

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edx

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#8
Originally posted by scanner


What kind of pics you normally take?
Different brands or rather different type of films are suitable for different situation.;)
well i took a set of shots out in broad daylight in my JC a few days ago..

didnt turn out the way i expected it would..

tomorrow going out to take pictures of the city.. dun want to waste my 5.50 + 10 bucks
 

rueyloon

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#9
the greatest deciding factor here would be the shop you send your pics for processing and printing....
 

scanner

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#10
Originally posted by rueyloon
the greatest deciding factor here would be the shop you send your pics for processing and printing....
Oh yes! This is very important!
Rueyloon, thanks for pointing that out. ;)

So edx, I presume you will be taking landscape, kind of pics?
For general guide, I 'll be using FujI Flim for this kind of shots:
e.g. Superior ISO 100 - 400 for negatives film,
Provia 100F - Provia 400 for slide. ;)

Actually it all depends on your preference.
 

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edx

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#11
Originally posted by scanner


Oh yes! This is very important!
Rueyloon, thanks for pointing that out. ;)

So edx, I presume you will be taking landscape, kind of pics?
not really.. something to describe it would be outdoor portrait shots
 

scanner

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#13
Originally posted by edx
not really.. something to describe it would be outdoor portrait shots
I see....
Normally I'll use or rather U might wan to consider trying Fuji NPH 400, NPC 160 or NPS160.
These films are designed specifically for portrait photography.
Definitely, there are other type of films which are also good for portrait, you need to try them out and decide on which one you really prefer.
 

#14
I second scanner's recommendation of NPH 400, NPC 160 and NPS 160. These are films specially designed for portraiture use, and renders skintones very well. They are low contrast, low saturation films so they can hold shadow and highlight detail very well. For this reason, they are well liked by wedding photographers as well.

Like rueyloon mentioned, a good lab is very important. Most neighbourhood labs produces prints with lousy or even horrible colours.

I've said this many times and I'll say it again: Do your camera and your effort a favour: Go to a good lab, don't cheap out on the processing. After spending all the money on pro lenses, pro bodies, etc, it simply does not make sense to process your film at a lab just so because it charges $0.20 per 4R.

Regards
CK
 

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