How many exposures for self roll film?


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leadwe

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Sep 18, 2003
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#1
Sorry if this sounds like a silly question. I have bought some self-rolled slides from a CSer, with the understanding that they are of the standard 36 exposures. However, today when I shot one roll, there were less than 20 exposures. I was surprised as this was not make known to me when I first bought the slides. It is also unfair as the price I paid was based on 36 exposures. Now I am not even sure how many exposures there are for the remaining rolls I bought.

I guess I shouldn't assume it was 36 exposures....
 

Larry

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Apr 25, 2002
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#2
erm. there's definitely something wrong then. mabbe the seller accidentally passed you a half-roll, which sometimes happens @ the end of one bulk can.

typically you can get 20-22 rolls out of one can, 33-36 exposures each.
 

leadwe

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#3
ok..I hope it was an honest mistake. Well, will shoot the other rolls and see what happens.
 

TME

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Jan 19, 2002
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#4
Sorry I am a complete noob with regard to sell-rolled film.... and sorry for the OT but how is it done without exposing the film? Where do u get empty canisters to contain the film?? How reliable is self-rolled film?

Thanks!
 

Ansel

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#5
If in doubt, you can load the film into a camera, set the aperture to f16 or f22 and shutter speed to 1/1000 or faster, keep the lens cap on and fire away until the end of roll to confirm how many exp you have on that roll. Then rewind it carefully, being careful to keep the loading leader (tongue) out of the cassette. That's the only way to be sure.
 

sequitur

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Apr 17, 2003
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#6
TME said:
Sorry I am a complete noob with regard to sell-rolled film.... and sorry for the OT but how is it done without exposing the film? Where do u get empty canisters to contain the film?? How reliable is self-rolled film?

Thanks!


1. there is a loader to not expose the film. to play safe i only roll my film at night so there's less light.

2. empty canisters.. most photo shops would have stocked up a whole load of them at the end of the day. they simply throw them away so even if you ask for 50 empty cans they'll gladly give them to you for free.

3. how reliable.. depends on who is rolling the film. if you're talking about reliability of RESULTS from the entire 100ft, then obviously because all 20 rolls come from the same 100ft, the results will be equal. if you're talking about reliability of bulk roll film being able to work, it's also reliable unless you screw up really badly or your loader got problem when you're loading the film. sometimes you might spot a whole line scratch across a whole roll... that's the loader's problem.
 

TME

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#7
sequitur said:
1. there is a loader to not expose the film. to play safe i only roll my film at night so there's less light.

2. empty canisters.. most photo shops would have stocked up a whole load of them at the end of the day. they simply throw them away so even if you ask for 50 empty cans they'll gladly give them to you for free.

3. how reliable.. depends on who is rolling the film. if you're talking about reliability of RESULTS from the entire 100ft, then obviously because all 20 rolls come from the same 100ft, the results will be equal. if you're talking about reliability of bulk roll film being able to work, it's also reliable unless you screw up really badly or your loader got problem when you're loading the film. sometimes you might spot a whole line scratch across a whole roll... that's the loader's problem.

I see... thanks! That was enlightening.... so may I conclude that self-rolled film is usually to save costs?
 

TME

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#8
Ansel said:
If in doubt, you can load the film into a camera, set the aperture to f16 or f22 and shutter speed to 1/1000 or faster, keep the lens cap on and fire away until the end of roll to confirm how many exp you have on that roll. Then rewind it carefully, being careful to keep the loading leader (tongue) out of the cassette. That's the only way to be sure.
That's like very chim....
 

sequitur

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Apr 17, 2003
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#9
TME said:
I see... thanks! That was enlightening.... so may I conclude that self-rolled film is usually to save costs?

save costs and enable constant results.

some people want to roll for fun.

some people want to roll less than 36 per roll.

some want to roll 10 per roll.

for me i just want to save costs, coz i prefer to shoot slides than film so buying boxed rolls are too expensive for me.
 

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