How is this done?


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Aug 20, 2004
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Serangoon Nth
#2
Could it me a superimposed picture?

If not, the exposure setting must really be at least 2 stops under to get true black for the mountains, hence able to capture the rays of light.

Please correct me if I'm wrong. Thanks.
:)
 

singscott

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#3
It not only shoot right, but good printing as well there alot of burning and dogde or digital imaging into it. Result like this seldom come from a straight shot. :think: But I must say the person know what he doing and do a good job, nice pix. :bigeyes:
 

Tzuen

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Jul 29, 2004
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#6
Its all about the right exposure to bring out the rays, usually under-exposure for the scene. I have seen rays like this b4. Not in Singapore but overseas.
 

Aug 20, 2004
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#7
:embrass:
Thanks ! I so mountain tortise ;p

hmm, then it's even more amazing...unless the film was scanned and post -processed.
Anyway, it's a great picture and really has lots of impact when I see it.
 

Prismatic

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#8
Actually, it also depends on the moisture and dust content in the air.
When there's more moisture and dust in the air, there is more scattering of light, and so light rays become more obvious.

Pictures like this could be taken on a late afternoon and it has been sunny throughout the day. At the end of the day, there will be a lot of moisture content in the air over water cos of evaporation. So when the clouds come and darken the landscape slightly, the light rays become more obvious.
 

pipefish

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Dec 23, 2003
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#9
My guess:

Exposure was taken off the lighter clouds to bring out the detail in the rays of light. Normally, this will result in loss of shadow detail - which is what you see in the foreground. Then he dodged extensively so as to bring back some detail in the shadows. He probably used a slowish shutter speed because there is no water detail.

Of course this is a tiny pic, so you would really only know if you can see the real photo.

Alan
 

justarius

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#10
I've seen rays like this quite a few times in Singapore already. The ones I've seen are all early in the morning when morning mist still hugs the ground. I wish I could take a few pictures of it, but unfortunately cameras are prohibited items in army camps. It's rather a shame though, cos some of the scenery in the training areas definitely rival those overseas and elsewhere.
 

megaweb

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#11
Get one thousand smokers to smoke out the area when the sun start to shine out from the cloud

just joking

You need some mists to bring out the ray effect
 

Kho King

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#14
I have seen this sun rays before. Tips are: wake up earlier in the morning, best if rained the night before, cold morning with mist still around, go to some trees/cold area, then you might be able to find the sunrays shining through the mist/trees reaching the ground :)
 

eric69

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#15
Prismatic said:
Actually, it also depends on the moisture and dust content in the air.
When there's more moisture and dust in the air, there is more scattering of light, and so light rays become more obvious.

Pictures like this could be taken on a late afternoon and it has been sunny throughout the day. At the end of the day, there will be a lot of moisture content in the air over water cos of evaporation. So when the clouds come and darken the landscape slightly, the light rays become more obvious.
It's during winter season that such dramatic scenes are visible. It's very
 

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