how do you shoot portraits?


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Feb 23, 2007
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Pandan Gardens
#1
i would like to know how you guys shoot portraits.

like those passport style type, without the use of studio lights.

how would you get the person to stand, and which lens you would prefer to use on a 1.6x body.

which angle to face the flash, etc

many thanks

(sorry mods, i dont know where to place this topic)
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
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#2
i would like to know how you guys shoot portraits.

like those passport style type, without the use of studio lights.

how would you get the person to stand, and which lens you would prefer to use on a 1.6x body.

which angle to face the flash, etc

many thanks

(sorry mods, i dont know where to place this topic)
Sorry.. That's going to be quite tough.. Photography is about recording light. If your light isn't right, you're not going to get the kind of picture you want. Light from flash is quite harsh, so you're bound to get shadows. An option is to bounce the flash from a wite wall or a piece of white styrofoam board.
 

Dream Merchant

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Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#3
Alamak! I kenar 'arrow' by friends so many times oredi so a bit of an 'expert' with FOC passport photos and no DSLR/studio lights/my own flash also don't have.

One very good option mentioned by Lisiaxon is to bounce the flash. Since 'passport' style requires very even lighting, best is to stand a bit further back and bounce off ceiling. Make sure the subject is standing AWAY from the wall. PP BG to get it totally white.

No bounce flash, no probalem.

Stand the subject CLOSE to a white or light coloured wall and just blast away with flash. Switch on Red-Eye mode if needed. There will be a very hard and dark shadow behind, but because it's so clearly defined, it's very easy to PP away. Soften face in PS as necessary.

Of course, got bounce flash easier to control and less touching up to do.

Lens - anything except weide-angles should be more than enough.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#4
Personally, I've shot quite a few too for frens and relatives, so shooting with a bounce card or the podket magiclight made it easy for me.

Generally I would bounce it directly upwards and create as little shadow as possible. Make sure that all features are clearly visible and nothing is obscured by hair or accessories. Getting the person to sit down makes it easier too... ;)
 

Feb 23, 2007
411
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16
Pandan Gardens
#5
hmmm..

im thinking of using a 50 f/1.8, much better than the kit lens im using..

as for lighting, if i cannot PS the photos as i need to give them immediately, what do you guys suggest?

is there anything else i should look out for?

i've seen photos where the bodies is slightly tilted. is that suggested?
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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Pasir Ris, Singapore
#6
i would like to know how you guys shoot portraits.

like those passport style type, without the use of studio lights.

how would you get the person to stand, and which lens you would prefer to use on a 1.6x body.

which angle to face the flash, etc

many thanks

(sorry mods, i dont know where to place this topic)
This is totally subjective. If you don't wish to use studio lights, you can make use of a few flash units and sync them together using a transmitter.

Portraiture is all about the creativity of the photographer. There's no fixed rule of how the model should pose or how to angle the light, etc.
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
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#7
This is totally subjective. If you don't wish to use studio lights, you can make use of a few flash units and sync them together using a transmitter.

Portraiture is all about the creativity of the photographer. There's no fixed rule of how the model should pose or how to angle the light, etc.
You've got to learn the rules first before you learn how to break them. Without knowing the rules, it's harder to know how you can creatively break them. End of the day, the learning curve becomes steeper because you won't know what you're trying to achieve.
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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Pasir Ris, Singapore
#8
You've got to learn the rules first before you learn how to break them. Without knowing the rules, it's harder to know how you can creatively break them. End of the day, the learning curve becomes steeper because you won't know what you're trying to achieve.
Yeah i agree, that's why i said it's all up to your own creativity cos there's no fixed rule to shoot portraiture. Ultimately it's what u really like that's impt. Of cos, the model must also be satisfied with your shots. As u go along, u'll learn more n more.
 

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