How do you find my macro photography?

Good or Bad? All votes welcomed.


Results are only viewable after voting.

Status
Not open for further replies.
Mar 2, 2004
38
0
0
#1
First try using Canon Ixus 400 macro, not sure if it's good. Can some experts give advice?

Exif data still intact with photo.

 

SniperD

Senior Member
#2
I think it's more of a close-up than macro.. but no worries, almost all started out like this.

Did you mount your cam on a tripod? Pic looks blurred
Colours are blown (overexposed), resulting in pasty colors and not so attractive view

Try to see if you can find isolated flowers next time, those one flower amidst the plant and use a smaller aperture say f8 and up to take the pic.

Check thru the MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY SECTION in the forum, there's plenty of tips and examples to pick up from.

meanwhile, just keep shooting! :)
 

Mar 2, 2004
38
0
0
#3
I tried out the camera for a very long time using macro function on the camera to shoot details of the flower. I'm unable to take macro shots cos it always turns out blurred.

I did not mount it on a tripod (cos no sure how much it cost & have no intend of buying 1 yet)

I will take your advice in looking for isolated flowers to try again. But sad to say, my camera cannot adjust aperture to f8. It's not like A70 which can be adjusted, mine is fixed. So I'm playing much with the "functions" on my camera instead. (Using manual setup of the camera to take this pic instead of auto) Will check out the macro photography section too.

Thanks :)

SniperD said:
I think it's more of a close-up than macro.. but no worries, almost all started out like this.

Did you mount your cam on a tripod? Pic looks blurred
Colours are blown (overexposed), resulting in pasty colors and not so attractive view

Try to see if you can find isolated flowers next time, those one flower amidst the plant and use a smaller aperture say f8 and up to take the pic.

Check thru the MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY SECTION in the forum, there's plenty of tips and examples to pick up from.

meanwhile, just keep shooting! :)
 

The_Cheat

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2004
2,278
0
0
Singapore
#4
I'm a macro and close-up newbie too!! :bsmilie:

Anyway, I have a few comments to add:
(1) when doing macro, go as close to the subject as possible. Thus, the usage of tripod is not really feasible all the time. Instead, if possible, choose a shorter shutter time, and shoot while holding your breath. Probably your shots may turn out blurish at first, due to some shaking. However, through practice, the movement would become less and less, and pictures would turn out good!

(2) also on the point of closing up to the subject, try not to zoom in when your camera is very close, since the focal length of the zoom is beyond that of the subject. To resolve this, use close-up filters.

(3) Shoot more! The more you shoot, the better you'll become! :)
 

Mar 2, 2004
38
0
0
#5
Thanks for the great tips! By the way, my shutter speed has been adjusted to the shortest shutter time. Was told by my friend that Canon Ixus is much of an auto camera, can't do much about adjusting the aperture & shutter speed. Shutter speed if adjusted is more for night shots only. :)

cheatchu79 said:
I'm a macro and close-up newbie too!! :bsmilie:

Anyway, I have a few comments to add:
(1) when doing macro, go as close to the subject as possible. Thus, the usage of tripod is not really feasible all the time. Instead, if possible, choose a shorter shutter time, and shoot while holding your breath. Probably your shots may turn out blurish at first, due to some shaking. However, through practice, the movement would become less and less, and pictures would turn out good!

(2) also on the point of closing up to the subject, try not to zoom in when your camera is very close, since the focal length of the zoom is beyond that of the subject. To resolve this, use close-up filters.

(3) Shoot more! The more you shoot, the better you'll become! :)
 

snowspeeder

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2004
3,672
0
36
www.themenatwork.com
#6
To ensure that the close up subject does not end up a little blur, using a tripod would be the best option. Tripods can cost as little as S$30 for a relatively decent one. Some are even cheaper.

If you're not using a tripod, you'll need to have very steady hands, especially if the shutter speed is somewhat slow. Often, a gentle breeze can also result in a lack of shapness in the image.
 

justarius

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2003
1,226
0
36
Northeast
Visit site
#7
Yah, I think a tripod is quite essential for macro still-life type of photography. The depth of field is very very small when doing macro shots, measured in mm...a bit of movement, a slight breeze etc will completely throw your shot off...
 

Mar 2, 2004
38
0
0
#8
thanks justarius & snowspeeder for your advices. :)
 

moos blues

New Member
Nov 12, 2003
680
0
0
33
Pasir ris
pachome2.pacific.net.sg
#9
hi there...

i own a IXUS 400 too... and its good for flowers... the ones i have taken so far anywae... if u dont mind i'll share some tips...

about the pic... it is washed out (color) and the while bits are overexposed...

1.) use the spot metering funtion on the ixus and point it directly at the brightest bits, this for shld give u a better exposure. whne the AiAF kicks in and gives u the green square, recompose the shot, framing the flowers in a nice way lor.

2.) looks like u shot in mid day. thats not very good thing for mi then to find the colours less saturated and less chance to play with flash.

3.) macro mode on the camera ( i assume is on; the flower thing) is 5cm at wide; when not zoomed in and 46cm at 3X so watch the minimal focusing distance.

4.) if u cannot get the right exposure, use the exposure compensation, first function in manual mode and play with that... its very good for getiing black backgrounds and using flash.

5.) using flash. i tend to under compensate by 1 - 2 stops, select flash to be on, focus, compose and shoot.. i get nice even pics for flowers. so far tried this at evening and in shade, not in bright daylight, so go experiment

try uncluttered flowers that have some distance between them or between the background... if not the flowers u want to show dont stand out cause theres not enough distance to get the back ground blur(DOF). i dont think its a matter of F8 or not, the cam does have an adjustable apature and will be F8 if u shot under the bright sunlight, but thats not important. work on your flower selection and composition.

=) i hope i've helped! IXUS 400 is a great cam to have esp the metering modes do play with them.. i like over long exposures at dusk, its very fun a simple meal at macs can look very diff. if u want to see some of me pics u cld pm me, i'll try to get them up soemwhere or mail u. =)


as for tripod, never found the need with the ixus and macro. shrugz. no flames. thnx.



:lovegrin:
 

jimtong

Senior Member
May 8, 2002
1,528
0
36
Singapore
jimmyto.ng
#12
Hi here is my 0.02 cents... make sure the wind are not strong, cos strong wind also cos your flower to sway therefore the the photo might turn out blur. Also check your camera's spec to see how close you can focus in macro mode.

Keep posting more photo!!! ;)
 

Mar 15, 2004
228
0
0
38
singapore
#13
:) i'll suggest sheathing the flower from wind if you wanna do macro flower shots.

depending on the brightness of the day, [since your cam doesn't allow any manual control] the shutter speed might vary quite a lot, 1/250 to 1/30.

if it's at say 1/60, a slight breeze will cause your shot to be slightly blur, well, it depends on whether you want that effect. i suppose not? :p

another option will be to cut the stem of the plant [if it's your own plant] and shift it indoor with controlled lighting. IMPO the effect will definately be much better.

well, hope i'm not talking crap here. :p
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom