How do u meter bridal gown and suit?


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shawntim

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Feb 13, 2002
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#1
There are several articles on how to meter snow by compensating +1 stop, which i take reference when trying to meter light colored bridal gowns. But when the groom is with her together, underexposing will mean I'll lose out details in the suit. But if i meter the suit, details in the gown and her skin would be lost due to overexposure.. how can I meter in such a case?

I have a few pictures that I can show, but for the sake of the bride and those leeches (and lechers), I cannot post them here.


Thanks Streetshooter for the correction.
 

mervlam

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#3
Originally posted by shawntim
There are several articles on how to meter snow by compensating -1,-2 stops, which i take reference when trying to meter light colored bridal gowns. But when the groom is with her together, underexposing will mean I'll lose out details in the suit. But if i meter the suit, details in the gown and her skin would be lost due to overexposure.. how can I meter in such a case?

I have a few pictures that I can show, but for the sake of the bride and those leeches (and lechers), I cannot post them here.
I would use partial or spot meter and meter off their faces... facial expressions are more important in this case.

Well, I may be wrong!
 

Red Dawn

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Jan 17, 2002
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#4
Originally posted by shawntim
There are several articles on how to meter snow by compensating -1,-2 stops, which i take reference when trying to meter light colored bridal gowns. But when the groom is with her together, underexposing will mean I'll lose out details in the suit. But if i meter the suit, details in the gown and her skin would be lost due to overexposure.. how can I meter in such a case?

I have a few pictures that I can show, but for the sake of the bride and those leeches (and lechers), I cannot post them here.
u dun meter the suit and gown, u meter and take the reading of the light in the room that they are in and let the exposure of the suit and gown fall in place.

you can get consistently exposed negatives that way rather than trying to fight against a fickle reflected light meter. Besides, wat are u going to do if they start posing with their Indian friend and their Malay friend with a bright shiny yellow outfit?
 

Apr 7, 2002
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#5
Originally posted by mervlam


I would use partial or spot meter and meter off their faces... facial expressions are more important in this case.

Well, I may be wrong!
Well, I agree with this point though. Normally bounce flash works wonders for almost any situation. I always arm myself with a light meter though to test out the light. No problem so far.

if you are using available lights, you have to just give and take. Well, normally I try to have a good mix of natural lights and flashes so the clients will not complain.
 

#6
Use a lower contrast film like NPH 400. I've never had any problems using the vastly superior :devil: :rbounce Nikon 3D Matrix Metering. At least 90% of the time, it works for me.

Best would be to invest in an incident light meter of coz.

Regards
CK
 

shawntim

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#8
Originally posted by Red Dawn
u dun meter the suit and gown, u meter and take the reading of the light in the room that they are in and let the exposure of the suit and gown fall in place.

you can get consistently exposed negatives that way rather than trying to fight against a fickle reflected light meter. Besides, wat are u going to do if they start posing with their Indian friend and their Malay friend with a bright shiny yellow outfit?
Do you mean by using a lightmeter? I only have my camera with me. Where should I point then? Should I use Spot, Average or Multi metering (s602z)?
 

Jul 28, 2002
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#9
As for the original question posted whether to meter on white gown or black suit, I thought this might be helpful:

Knowing HOW and WHERE to EXPOSE!

As for metering on the face, it works fine as long as the face is not too white/black to cause underexposure/overexposure.
 

mervlam

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#10
Originally posted by ckiang
Use a lower contrast film like NPH 400. I've never had any problems using the vastly superior :devil: :rbounce Nikon 3D Matrix Metering. At least 90% of the time, it works for me.

Best would be to invest in an incident light meter of coz.

Regards
CK
vastly superior?

is it more superior than Canon's 35 zone evaluative metering on my Canon EOS 30? :devil: :rbounce:

eh... guys, take it easy ok? I dont want to start a flame war (just a joke!) :D
 

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