How do I take photos of a badminton game?


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MRSAMO

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#1
Hi folks, I've tried with both my 11-16 and 50mm and the shots came out blurred or too dark. Do I need to do some special settings or are these lenses not suitable for such a fast game?
 

MRSAMO

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#3
I tried with the settings but didn't have time to play around with it enough (as I was also playing). Originally it was at ISO200 but was too dark, then I set it to ISO800 which looked a lot better from the LCD view but crap on my computer. Aperture wise, I set it to 1.8 or 2.8. The hall had lighting but dark for the camera! So I'm wondering what I should have done here.

Oh, I didn't use the flash.
 

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#4
might need flash or even higher ISO..

though i'd not be sure if flash will be allowed in badminton matches (if you are taking badminton matches)..

if you were using UWA and the 50mm prime i'd expect you to be very near the action? usually sports photographers take badmintom matches with telephoto lens i believe.. like 70-200..
 

MRSAMO

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#5
might need flash or even higher ISO..

though i'd not be sure if flash will be allowed in badminton matches (if you are taking badminton matches)..

if you were using UWA and the 50mm prime i'd expect you to be very near the action? usually sports photographers take badmintom matches with telephoto lens i believe.. like 70-200..
I was about 10-15 metres from the main action and didn't want to use the flash while they were playing (they became self conscious too).

I think its my ISO settings, at 200 it was just too dark but I couldn't understand why considering that I have taken photos in darker places before and they all came out pretty good. I changed it to 800 which resulted in a lot of noise but at least it became bright enough. Anyway I've uploaded some samples, check them out :





 

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shahrulesa

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#6
Was there any minus conpensation dialed in?
 

rexlim

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#9
Photos look ok on my screen. Is your monitor calibrated?
 

#10
you used full manual? hmm... then the camera set to spot metering probably doesn't mean much.. does it?

in indoor situations.. 1/125 is probably not sufficient to let in enough light for a proper exposure..

maybe you might want to use aperture priority mode first in future to get a feel of the "camera metered" shutter speeds and work around the ISO/shutter/aperture range from there..
 

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#12
I used f/2, iso 800, shutter 1/80-1/100.... was fine, noise was ok on my cam :) just have to watch the focus as if there is anything to contrasty in the background for me the focus would jump:(
 

MRSAMO

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#13
you used full manual? hmm... then the camera set to spot metering probably doesn't mean much.. does it?

in indoor situations.. 1/125 is probably not sufficient to let in enough light for a proper exposure..

maybe you might want to use aperture priority mode first in future to get a feel of the "camera metered" shutter speeds and work around the ISO/shutter/aperture range from there..
Yeah I played around with A mode but found the shutter speed too slow to capture the players in action, which was why I switched to manual.

I was told spot metering was better in terms of focusing on the target better (usually in the centre right?). Sorry, I'm still green when it comes to action shots and playing around with metering.

But thanks anyway for your help!
 

MRSAMO

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#14
I used f/2, iso 800, shutter 1/80-1/100.... was fine, noise was ok on my cam :) just have to watch the focus as if there is anything to contrasty in the background for me the focus would jump:(
Here is what I am assuming when it comes to manual settings, if there is plenty of light for the naked eye to see everything then I don't think I need to raise the ISO to higher than 800. My D50 only goes to 1600 and it looks terrible. I figured that the lower the ISO the sharper it is going to be, but with the lens that I was using I didn't think I need to raise the ISO level so high.

I was hoping to set the shutter speed to around 1/800 or 1/1000 but failed terribly. Maybe I should have used flash?
 

#15
Yeah I played around with A mode but found the shutter speed too slow to capture the players in action, which was why I switched to manual.

I was told spot metering was better in terms of focusing on the target better (usually in the centre right?). Sorry, I'm still green when it comes to action shots and playing around with metering.

But thanks anyway for your help!
you're not quite making sense here.. in the fundamentals that is..

if you used aperture priority mode earlier.. and the shutter speed is too slow for your liking.. and then you switched to faster shutter speed.. ceteris paribus (everything else kept the same).. then of course you will get dark pictures..

to maintain a fast shutter speed for your action.. and to maintain the "correct" exposure.. you can either open up your aperture more (if possible).. or dial up your ISO to 800 / 1600 (or even higher)..

i suggest you google on "relationship of ISO / shutter speeds and aperture size" for that..

as for your understanding of metering.. yes it's true that spot metering is used to meter the light from one particular spot in the centre.. but if you chose to use full manual (M mode).. then there is not much "metering" to speak of.. since you decide to override whatever the camera "metered" for you..

i suggest you google "how metering works" for that..
 

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#16
Here is what I am assuming when it comes to manual settings, if there is plenty of light for the naked eye to see everything then I don't think I need to raise the ISO to higher than 800. My D50 only goes to 1600 and it looks terrible. I figured that the lower the ISO the sharper it is going to be, but with the lens that I was using I didn't think I need to raise the ISO level so high.

I was hoping to set the shutter speed to around 1/800 or 1/1000 but failed terribly. Maybe I should have used flash?
the simple explanation will be that your camera obviously doesn't see as much light as your naked eyes..
 

MRSAMO

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#17
Thanks mate for the explanation. I will get back to the discussion later, right now I need some sleep.
 

#18
Here is what I am assuming when it comes to manual settings, if there is plenty of light for the naked eye to see everything then I don't think I need to raise the ISO to higher than 800. My D50 only goes to 1600 and it looks terrible. I figured that the lower the ISO the sharper it is going to be, but with the lens that I was using I didn't think I need to raise the ISO level so high.

I was hoping to set the shutter speed to around 1/800 or 1/1000 but failed terribly. Maybe I should have used flash?
Of course you have to use a flash in this instance heh.. There is not enough light in that hall for you to capture fast motion shots like someone whacking away at a shuttlecock heheh... You have to be shooting at about 1/500 to 1/1000 to freeze the action or maybe more if they are moving about faster like when they do a over head smash shot with the shuttlecock blasting away heh. ISO is all about getting too much graininess in your photo as oppose to less graininess shoot at ISO 200 for example.

Problem with using flash is, will you be distracting the players and end up having the shuttlecock whacked at you for spoiling their game. heheh...

With Flash fill-in shot you can also sent it to rear flash so that when you shoot the shot at say a slower speed like what you shot, the tail end of the shutter ..when it is about to close will be when the flash will fire so you end up with a shot that have a blurred streak of white of the shuttle which is leaded by a sharp photo of the shuttlecock freezed in place by the fast flashing. Not sure if you know what I mean by that heheh....
 

denniskee

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#19
hi ts, from the photo u posted, they looks ok lay.

if u need to pp to get the photos from ur current setup, than do it. as long as u get the result.

looking ur write up, already at aperture f1.8, there are only a handful of lens than is faster than that, so assuming cant use flash for indoor games, u r left with 2 other choice :

1) get the authority to brighten the hall with more lights.

2) use a camera that has better noise control at iso 1600 or even 3200.
 

#20
hi ts, from the photo u posted, they looks ok lay.

if u need to pp to get the photos from ur current setup, than do it. as long as u get the result.

looking ur write up, already at aperture f1.8, there are only a handful of lens than is faster than that, so assuming cant use flash for indoor games, u r left with 2 other choice :

1) get the authority to brighten the hall with more lights.

2) use a camera that has better noise control at iso 1600 or even 3200.
Or you lend him your that specially made killer flash lah heheheh.
 

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