How do I create bounce flash effect with built-in flash?


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Zookeeper

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#1
Hi, I have seen some photographers attach small, white cardboard pieces next to 35mm compact's built-in flash, to achieve the bounce flash effect so that the lighting on their subjects isn't too harsh. Can anybody advise/explain to me how this works, and how to go about the setup? Any special cardboard to use, how to position and attach it to the built-in flash?

Thanks!!!!!
:gbounce:
 

Zookeeper

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#4
Originally posted by ckiang
Forget it, the internal flash is already so weak, it makes no sense to bounce it off anything!

Regards
CK
So, what would you suggest as a solution to not letting the flashlight reflect harshly off the faces of my subjects? (especially those with make-up on their faces, flashlight "whitens" their faces like anything.) Use no flash?

Actually from my own humble experience, internal flash can be quite strong and overwhelming too.
 

Kho King

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#7
Originally posted by anonymous
ckiang, can teach me how to use an omni-bounce? Do I still need to tilt the lens if I use an omni-bounce?

Thanks.
When using Omni bounce, tilt your flash 45 to 60 degree. If you shoot directly, the effect is still the same or little different as if without omni bounce.

The term "bounce flash" with built in flash is not right. U can't bounce the built in flash as like CK said, the built in flash is too week to bounce. Like other suggested, use a tissue to soften the output of the flash or simply dial in flash compensation to reduce the output of your flash.

Hope this helps.
 

beachbum

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#13
Originally posted by Kho King


When using Omni bounce, tilt your flash 45 to 60 degree. If you shoot directly, the effect is still the same or little different as if without omni bounce.
The term "bounce flash" with built in flash is not right. U can't bounce the built in flash as like CK said, the built in flash is too week to bounce. Like other suggested, use a tissue to soften the output of the flash or simply dial in flash compensation to reduce the output of your flash.

okay, the basic issue that yunling is concern is about quality of light. this is not to be confuse with quatity of light.
to dial in flash exposure compensation is to reduce light output. however this will not improve quality of light.
using things like Omni bounce and tissue paper helps to modify the quality of light to make them more attractive.
using omni bounce straight on, will help to improve the quality of light, just as a bounce card or those cobra strap-on reflector thingy.
 

franciskc

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#16
Originally posted by maddog
i use translucent paper. was experimenting with several pieces of varying transparency, the other day. Have a look.

flash
wah liaoz... use ps can edit liaoz mar... lol
:p
but nice experiment. shud try on slides or film. better results.
 

maddog

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#17
Originally posted by franciskc


wah liaoz... use ps can edit liaoz mar... lol
:p
but nice experiment. shud try on slides or film. better results.
are u sure? by controlling brightness? this usually degrades ur image. if u don't have a decent image to begin with, i don't even bother editing.
 

SNAG

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#18
Originally posted by beachbum


okay, the basic issue that yunling is concern is about quality of light. this is not to be confuse with quatity of light.
to dial in flash exposure compensation is to reduce light output. however this will not improve quality of light.
using things like Omni bounce and tissue paper helps to modify the quality of light to make them more attractive.
using omni bounce straight on, will help to improve the quality of light, just as a bounce card or those cobra strap-on reflector thingy.
Hmm..
This prompted me to ask a question.

I also have this problem using the internal flash of my F80.
I tried to compensate -0.5 for the flash to prevent harsh lighting when I used it the first time, but it seemed that it was slightly underexposed.

By using a omni-bounce or something over the flash, it will diffuse the light, so that it won't be that harsh on the subject right? Even though if it's used straight on without any bouncing.... will there be any differences?

It's the quality VS quantity thing that beachbum pointed out...
 

beachbum

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#19
1. yes, there will be an improve in quality of light (more diffuse and less harsh) even if you use Omni bounce and shoot straight on.
2. if you are using your flash as the main source of lighting, reducing output by 0.5 stops will mean underexposing by 0.5 stops. reducing flash output only applies when the flash is only for fill-in.
there are a few threads in the forum where balancing flash with ambience light were deal with.
hope this helps! :)
 

Zookeeper

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Apr 23, 2002
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#20
Hi people,

Just to report that covering my built-in flash with tissue while setting the flash settings to slow sync2 on my C700UZ, really helps to cut off the "shine" of make-up on faces. Can't post photos here coz' couldn't get permssion from my "model" to do so, sorry! But it does work! (on human faces with makeup only, no visible effect on the other things in the same photo.)
 

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