Hotspots on face


Dec 12, 2012
871
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0
Singapore
#1
Hi everyone. I'm looking to troubleshoot some issues I faced on a shoot last weekend.

Here is a link to the processed photos form a shoot the past weekend.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1403191

Later into the shoot I encountered several problems. There were hotspots on the model's face when the light was at certain angles.
Is it becos of a) the light being too close and too strong? b) perspiration and moisture on the model's face? (c) other factors?

If it is (a) how do I overcome this? Use a softbox instead? Or use a shoot-through umbrella?



I was using a 6d with a 70-200 f2.8.
Yn 560 on a light stand with a reflective umbrella on camera right.
 

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Dec 12, 2012
871
9
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Singapore
#2
Follow up question

What is the real difference btwn a reflective and a shoot thru. I have tried both but I honestly can't tell the difference. (Though I can say that using the umbrellas are better that not having any modifiers as the umbrellas produces softer light)

After watching many videos and reading many articles ( which offer different opinions) I have somewhat gathered that.reflective umbrellas are better for group shots as the speed the light more and are more intense. Shoot through would be better for close up portraits.

Form your experience, how true is this?

Thanks for sharing!
Regards,
Norman
 

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user12343

Senior Member
May 15, 2005
1,032
2
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#6
while hotspots can be reduced/eliminated in post, it is always better to "pre-touch" before the shoot than to "re-touch" in post. but this model's skin maybe smooth and reflective and is not oily, then another way is to reorient the light sources or camera angle to avoid this.
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
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0
Singapore
#7
btw, the closer the light the better, it works best is just right outside your frame.
Thanks Mr Catchlights for the invaluable advice! Very much appreciated!

Shall take note. No reflective makeup, use oil blotter and raise light stand!
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#8
while hotspots can be reduced/eliminated in post, it is always better to "pre-touch" before the shoot than to "re-touch" in post. but this model's skin maybe smooth and reflective and is not oily, then another way is to reorient the light sources or camera angle to avoid this.
I would certainly prefer to correct the situation on site before the shot. And I didn't realise that some skin types are reflective. I always assumed that the reflection is due to oil and moisture. Given the use of a blotter as Mr Catchlights had suggested, I thought that would settle the issue.

In any case, shall take note of your tip. So just to clarify, use some sort of "light feathering" technique in such situations?

THanks for sharing user 12343!
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
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#9
the make up for photography is should be matte base, experienced make-up artists know this.

if failed, this should help.

Yup
I'm MUA trained. You need to apply loose powder when you see shining face.

No loose powder even talcum will do
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,644
63
48
lil red dot
#10
Facial oils and sweat... Once you see this you need to get MUA to touch up.

Anyway about your reflective vs shoot through question. The difference is quite small, when shot at the same distance: Shoot through is slightly more contrasty (very slightly), and have less light spill than a reflective. But you lose more power with a shoot through than a reflective.

But, You can get a shoot-through closer to the subject than a reflective. which will soften the light more than a reflective, and let you lower your flash power.

So in the end, a shoot through is more desirable.
 

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Zeisser

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2008
2,653
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Tampines
www.flickr.com
#11
Just to chip in some thoughts. Agree with bro Catchlights about light placement should be higher and
make up a major factor. Just to share this shot light was bounced thru a white translucent umbrella
as it shows the light falls mainly on her forehead hair line and reflection was at it's minimium on the face.
I always like bounce light as it gives a soft light source. Make up artistes are equally important in any photoshoots
and their make up skills are either make or break. Reflections are always present it's how one manage to angle the shot.

 

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Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
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#12
Also, Norman, by the thin DOF effect you may be shooting wide open. Stop down a little, the subject's arms are also over exposed. I'll PM you
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
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Singapore
#13
To dd123, Zeisser, Shizuma.


Thanks for chipping in with the tips. Really very helpful. Dd123 appreciate the breakdown of the difference btwn the shoot thru and the reflective umbrella. It makes more sense now!

Thanks for the example Zeisser. Shall make note of the angle(after I did a little more reading I understand that it is to simulate the angle of the sun that our eyes are so used to seeing. Got it!)

And Shizuma. Talcum powder! Shall put it in my bag right away!
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#14
Btw, this is what I really love about CS. The members are always ready to share knowledge. Thanks again for the very valuable sharing!
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
25
0
#15
To dd123, Zeisser, Shizuma.


Thanks for chipping in with the tips. Really very helpful. Dd123 appreciate the breakdown of the difference btwn the shoot thru and the reflective umbrella. It makes more sense now!

Thanks for the example Zeisser. Shall make note of the angle(after I did a little more reading I understand that it is to simulate the angle of the sun that our eyes are so used to seeing. Got it!)

And Shizuma. Talcum powder! Shall put it in my bag right away!
I strongly recommend translucent loose powder. You can ask the makeup ppl at Sasa for help
 

Jan 25, 2007
1,638
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NorthEast
#16
Just be careful not to over powder the face, otherwise, you will have ashy faces. And also, do not offer your powder as well, as not all powders work for everyone. Some models' my have sensitive skin and you powder may not work for them. If needs be, request for the models to touch up their make up. Just my 2cts..
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#17
Just be careful not to over powder the face, otherwise, you will have ashy faces. And also, do not offer your powder as well, as not all powders work for everyone. Some models' my have sensitive skin and you powder may not work for them. If needs be, request for the models to touch up their make up. Just my 2cts..
Noted!

Shall remember the part on allergies. Well being takes precedence over all else!
 

Zeisser

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2008
2,653
11
38
Tampines
www.flickr.com
#18
Agree with PhotoProZero about the use of powder for photoshoots. What are being used are
mostly foundation base where reflections under any conditions are at least minimise. Just to share
some works of my colleagues during events and powder was never an option. This was shot in a hotel room
with available light...



 

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Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#19
Agree with PhotoProZero about the use of powder for photoshoots. What are being used are
mostly foundation base where reflections under any conditions are at least minimise. Just to share
some works of my colleagues during events and powder was never an option. This was shot in a hotel room
with available light...
Ah. I see. Foundation is less reflective than powders. Noted!
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
25
0
#20
Alternatively you can stop down or attenuate your flash power slightly and bring it up in post.
You could also shoot with an ND filter (never tried before), which will attenuate flash power a little . (I have no empirical experience with this)
 

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