Histogram in D200


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jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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i was reading martin evening LR book.
he mentioned when we shoot RAW, we shouldnt use the histogram as a guide to see clipping, as the histogram is based on jpeg images.
so can i safely say i can forego looking at the histogram when shooting hi and low key portraits wif my d200?

he didnt mention camera brands.but he uses canon.

gurus advise please.
 

theRBK

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May 16, 2005
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i was reading martin evening LR book.
he mentioned when we shoot RAW, we shouldnt use the histogram as a guide to see clipping, as the histogram is based on jpeg images.
so can i safely say i can forego looking at the histogram when shooting hi and low key portraits wif my d200?

he didnt mention camera brands.but he uses canon.
well, looking at histogram is a safety thing... if everything is within histogram, then you are assured its captured in the RAW file... if its not, it might still be salvagable in RAW file but how would you know if it is?... there is one way you can find out:

- shoot at a neutral toned textured wall properly metered
- increase exposure by 1/3 from properly metered and take a shot... repeat until and just beyond which everthing is totally white
- decrease exposure by 1/3 from properly metered and take a shot... repeat until and just beyond which everthing is totally black
- process all the files without modifying exposure
- look for the darkest and brightest images that still retain texture of wall
- calculate how many stops of light (with each image being 1/3 stop apart) where detail can be seen
- that is the dynamic range of your camera

now, knowing your camera's dynamic range, you can then estimate if a certain image is going to be within the dynamic range of your camera... of course, to be able to understand that, it would be useful to understand abit about the zone system so that you can estimate how many stops is present in a scene you want to capture... or of course you can use a spot meter to measure the brightest and darkest spot in the scene... :)
 

jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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rbk,
thanks.sounds 'troublesome'.:bsmilie:
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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Dun forget the D200 has a 4 coloured histogram as well, use tat one for better judgement.
 

theRBK

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May 16, 2005
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rbk,
thanks.sounds 'troublesome'.:bsmilie:
its not, really... I did it for my previous camera (an Oly E10) cause it is earlier tech and has narrower dynamic range... and it works :)
 

gooseberry

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Mar 11, 2004
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...as the histogram is based on jpeg images....
Yes, the histogram you see on the camera when you are shooting RAW will be based on the jpeg rendered by the camera - which will depend on your camera settings. The histogram (especially for the red and blue channels) will depend on what WB setting you have put in, also it will be dependant (to various degrees) on what tone curve you are using and what sharpening settings you have.

On Nikon cameras, to get as accurate a histogram representation as possible for each of the colour channels, you can load a UniWB white balance setting (this is a special setting where each of the red and blue white balance co-efficients are 1 - thus the name), load a totally linear tone curve, sharpening set to none and using AdobeRGB colour space and colour mode II.
 

jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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Yes, the histogram you see on the camera when you are shooting RAW will be based on the jpeg rendered by the camera - which will depend on your camera settings. The histogram (especially for the red and blue channels) will depend on what WB setting you have put in, also it will be dependant (to various degrees) on what tone curve you are using and what sharpening settings you have.

On Nikon cameras, to get as accurate a histogram representation as possible for each of the colour channels, you can load a UniWB white balance setting (this is a special setting where each of the red and blue white balance co-efficients are 1 - thus the name), load a totally linear tone curve, sharpening set to none and using AdobeRGB colour space and colour mode II.
sometimes i just wish i know the technicalities of my camera like you guys.i have no idea what you are referring to in the last sentence.:cry:
 

gooseberry

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Mar 11, 2004
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sometimes i just wish i know the technicalities of my camera like you guys.i have no idea what you are referring to in the last sentence.:cry:
I'll see if I can explain the two items that I was talking about in that last sentence - might be a bit hard and end up being long winded.

First item, you know about white balance right ?

To achieve white balance, usually digital cameras electronically multiply the signal values from the red and blue channels (you can see this in the exif information in your images, you'll see a red balance and a blue balance value, each of these is a number, what the camera or RAW converter does is multiply the values from the red or blue channel with that number). So your histogram that you see is dependent on your white balance setting.

On Nikon cameras (I am not aware of other makes of camera where you can do this), you can load a special white balance setting where these numbers used to multiply the red and blue channels are set to 1 - thus with this setting, you can see a more accurate representation of the light your sensor is being exposed to - thus a more accurate histogram. (This by the way, can help you understand why certain lighting conditions produce more noise than others - for example in certain types of incandescent light, the blue channel is actually 2 stops underexposed compared to the green channel on certain cameras, and also why some people use colour correction filters to reduce noise in shadows etc)

Second item, you know about tone curves right ? That setting on your D200 under optimise image where you can set the tone curve to Normal, Auto, More Contrast, Less Contrast or Custom ?

What's neat about Custom is that you can load your own custom curves (like going into the Curves tool in photoshop except you can do it in camera), and as you may be aware, some users have created their own for different cameras to reduce the amount of PP work they need to do to the image. But the tone curves can affect the histogram you see as well. To get an un-modified representation of your histogram, you can load a linear custom curve - ie. one that is a totally straight line going at a 45 degree angle from the bottom left corner to the top right hand corner.
 

theRBK

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May 16, 2005
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good explainations gooseberry...:thumbsup:

and Jeanie, technicalities of camera don't magically pop into heads...have to spend time, years even, learning :)
 

jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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goose,thanks very much.i'll go home digest it over some wine.:)

RBK,
ya.i agree.i love photography, but hate the technical aspects of it.i reckon most gals are like that?:dunno: ;)
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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goose,thanks very much.i'll go home digest it over some wine.:)

RBK,
ya.i agree.i love photography, but hate the technical aspects of it.i reckon most gals are like that?:dunno: ;)
Actually... gers hate the technical aspect of everything... hahah
 

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