High ISO B&W film


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photo-file

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Most of the time, when required to shoot in low light, my choice of film is Tri-X/HP5+ (pushed 1600 / 3200). Of course this leads to extended development time, too contrasty and grainier.

Would like to look for alternative and seek opinions from CSers on the currently available high ISO films in the market:

- Neopan 1600
- Delta 3200
- TMax 3200

Which do you prefer and your experience on the developer used.

Thanks.
 

edlye

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I've been shooting Delta 3200 rated at 1600 and souped in DDX according to 3200 timing. I find this combi great for scanning and my digital workflow as the shadow details are captured nicely and is not too contrasty like HP5 pushed to 1600. I've heard good things about Neopan 1600 but don't seem to be able to find any in the shops, any idea where it is sold?
 

photo-file

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edlye said:
I've been shooting Delta 3200 rated at 1600 and souped in DDX according to 3200 timing. I find this combi great for scanning and my digital workflow as the shadow details are captured nicely and is not too contrasty like HP5 pushed to 1600. I've heard good things about Neopan 1600 but don't seem to be able to find any in the shops, any idea where it is sold?
Neopan 1600 is available at Konota at S$7, compared to Tri-X (pushed) at S$4.50, I wonder how will the S$2.50 difference translate to?
 

canturn

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Have been using tri-x for weddings and switched to Neopan 1600. Figured that tri-x at EI1250 with diafine wasn't the recipe for wedding photos and needed something that can be pushed, so tried Neopan 1600.

Neopan 1600 is a sharp film and if you develop it in DD-X when pushed to ISO 2400 - 3200, it is not too overcontrasty and yet it has enough depth and grey tones.

If you want it to be less grainy and sharper, try Neopan at ISO 800-1000 and develop it in D76, gives a modern b&w look to it. Grain's considerably fine for EI800.
 

GitS

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have moved from tmax 3200 to delta 3200 to neopan 1600 currently. i find neopan has the finest grain, allows you to shoot under lowlight conditions without too much grain, more palatable to the mainstream wedding couples...
 

canturn

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GitS said:
have moved from tmax 3200 to delta 3200 to neopan 1600 currently. i find neopan has the finest grain, allows you to shoot under lowlight conditions without too much grain, more palatable to the mainstream wedding couples...
Depends on your chemistry and choice of developer. Neopan can be very fine grain with DD-X at 3200 but grainy even with D76 at 1600.
 

Patryk

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I've only tried TMax 3200 before, and had fairly good results.. Unfortunately developed it wrongly sometimes and got very flat looking negs.. Well, Kodak has stopped shipping it (or stopped production, not sure) to Singapore (according to Cathay Photo)..so gotta search abit to find it. Luckily i still got one unused roll..heh..
 

GitS

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canturn said:
Depends on your chemistry and choice of developer. Neopan can be very fine grain with DD-X at 3200 but grainy even with D76 at 1600.
yep, i use ddx.
 

tucker

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canturn said:
Depends on your chemistry and choice of developer. Neopan can be very fine grain with DD-X at 3200 but grainy even with D76 at 1600.
wow~ that's sth new!
nvr know 1600 can be fine!?
guess I really messed up my dev'ing, I keep getting lovely grainy neg, cld it be e paper ?

btw, what is e modern B&W look ??


yeah?
 

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