Hi New Here, Seek Comments


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Sep 1, 2008
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#1
Hi, I am new to DSLR and Photography and seek to learn more on how to improve my photography skills.

Please give your valuable comments on the this shot that I have took.



The image was taken on the following settings on a EOS 450D with Kits Lens 18-55mm:

Shooting Mode:AV
Shutter Speed: 0.3
Aperture Value: 5.6
Exposure Compensation: 0
ISO Speed: 400
Focal Length: 55mm

The image seems okay on a smaller scale. However it looks grainy when scale to 100% (4272 x 2848 RAW).

Why is that so? Is it due to my settings or Camera shake? Or is that limitation of the kit lens?

Thanks for viewing.

BlackCloud :)
 

Aug 30, 2008
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#2
Probably ISO noise. Try using lower ISO.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#3
The image was taken on the following settings on a EOS 450D with Kits Lens 18-55mm:

Shooting Mode:AV
Shutter Speed: 0.3
Aperture Value: 5.6
Exposure Compensation: 0
ISO Speed: 400
Focal Length: 55mm

The image seems okay on a smaller scale. However it looks grainy when scale to 100% (4272 x 2848 RAW).

Why is that so? Is it due to my settings or Camera shake? Or is that limitation of the kit lens?

Thanks for viewing.

BlackCloud :)
It's not because of lenses that you get grain, not is it camera shake. It's your ISO. Try shooting at 100 ISO.

This is especially evident when shooting RAW, as it does not pass through noise reduction.
 

Sep 1, 2008
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Central
#4
Thanks for your prompt replies, I will bear that in mind regarding the ISO. :)

But, will reducing the ISO cause the image to be darker?
 

Aug 30, 2008
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#5
Yes as the sensor's sensitivity to light is decreased. To counter this increase exposure length
 

Sep 1, 2008
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Central
#6
Yes as the sensor's sensitivity to light is decreased. To counter this increase exposure length
By exposure length, do you mean the exposure compensation? Hehehe... (New to the jargons)

I am looking at another image that I took, which I have used ISO 500, TV:1/25, AV:4.5 and focal length at 22mm. It did not looks as grainy as my HDB shot. Can It be the amount of sunlight that plays the part?

Thanks.

BlackCloud :)
 

Aug 30, 2008
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#7
Exposure length is the same as shutter speed. Increase it by a few stops.

ISO noise becomes more and more visible the longer the exposure and the lesser the ambient light. So if you are shooting at mid day, even at ISO 1600 the picture should be relatively noise free(except at the areas with dark shadows).
 

Sep 1, 2008
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Central
#8
Exposure length is the same as shutter speed. Increase it by a few stops.

ISO noise becomes more and more visible the longer the exposure and the lesser the ambient light. So if you are shooting at mid day, even at ISO 1600 the picture should be relatively noise free(except at the areas with dark shadows).
Hmm.. So by increasing the shutter speed you mean I have to have faster shutter speed? example 1/100 instead of the 1/30 that I took? :)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#9
By exposure length, do you mean the exposure compensation? Hehehe... (New to the jargons)

I am looking at another image that I took, which I have used ISO 500, TV:1/25, AV:4.5 and focal length at 22mm. It did not looks as grainy as my HDB shot. Can It be the amount of sunlight that plays the part?

Thanks.

BlackCloud :)
ISO grain is more likely to show up in dark areas.

Not Exposure compensation. exposure TIME.

It's basic photography maths, I suggest you read the newbie's guide to photography on here.

But a quick idea: Let's say at ISO 400, you can take the shot at 1/4 second. You reduce the ISO to 100, or 1/4 of the former sensitivity. Logically, you must compensate something by 4x to make up for it... Like exposure time, which then becomes 1s.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#10
Hmm.. So by increasing the shutter speed you mean I have to have faster shutter speed? example 1/100 instead of the 1/30 that I took? :)
Increase means LONGER, not shorter. 1/100 is shorter than 1/30. Please read the newbies guide. A lot of hard work went into it to answer the exact questions you are asking.
 

Sep 1, 2008
28
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Central
#11
ISO grain is more likely to show up in dark areas.

Not Exposure compensation. exposure TIME.

It's basic photography maths, I suggest you read the newbie's guide to photography on here.

But a quick idea: Let's say at ISO 400, you can take the shot at 1/4 second. You reduce the ISO to 100, or 1/4 of the former sensitivity. Logically, you must compensate something by 4x to make up for it... Like exposure time, which then becomes 1s.
Hohohoho... I get it ! So to say for my image, which was set at ISO 400 and Shutter Speed: 1/30, I probably need to reduce to ISO 100 hence Shutter Speed I have to increase to 1/120?

Hehehe.. Thanks guys ! You been very patience guiding this noob. :bsmilie: Hope I can take a better image soon based on what I just learnt. :)

BlackCloud :)
 

Jul 14, 2007
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#12
Maybe I'm being ignorant abt these; but as long as I know I wont be printing out my pictures for any size bigger than 5R; I wouldnt be too bothered with it.
Most times, my pictures will be uploaded in JPEG and in around 300 - 400 kb files; enough for the monitor and the eyes. Noise are negligible.. unless you'd go around blowing up pictures and pixel - spotting lah...
 

espion

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2005
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#13
What are you trying to capture?

HDB flats (are they?), lights? Geometric shapes? twilight sky?

Put the technical aside for the moment, they are secondary to the intention in the picture.

Right now all I see are nondescript shapes and lights in a twilight sky. It could well have been an accidental shot, or even, in Clubsnap's most dreaded term, a snap shot.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#14
Hohohoho... I get it ! So to say for my image, which was set at ISO 400 and Shutter Speed: 1/30, I probably need to reduce to ISO 100 hence Shutter Speed I have to increase to 1/120?

No. Your math is all wrong. 1/120 is faster, not longer. By reducing to 1/12- and ISO 100, you're only getting 1/8th of the original exposure. The correct math would be to increase shutter speed to 1/8s.
 

Sep 1, 2008
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Central
#15
What are you trying to capture?

HDB flats (are they?), lights? Geometric shapes? twilight sky?

Put the technical aside for the moment, they are secondary to the intention in the picture.

Right now all I see are nondescript shapes and lights in a twilight sky. It could well have been an accidental shot, or even, in Clubsnap's most dreaded term, a snap shot.
I was trying to capture the HDB flats lights with the twilight sky. :)
 

espion

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Aug 25, 2005
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#16
I was trying to capture the HDB flats lights with the twilight sky. :)
So do you think you were successful? And even so do you think there are better ways of capturing such a scene? Can it be made more interesting? Maybe something that even attracts the attention of people who have been seeing such a scene all their lives? Or perhaps there are none, then do you think that this is a worthwhile picture at all?
 

Sep 1, 2008
28
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0
Central
#17
So do you think you were successful? And even so do you think there are better ways of capturing such a scene? Can it be made more interesting? Maybe something that even attracts the attention of people who have been seeing such a scene all their lives? Or perhaps there are none, then do you think that this is a worthwhile picture at all?
Hmm.. I kinda like the colors of the flats and its lights together with the twilight sky. However, I dun feel its very satisfactory and there should be a better way of capturing it. :bsmilie:

Maybe the angles? or something that I can look out for? Maybe you guys can help suggest given the scenario what might be a better way of capturing it? Thanks. :)
 

Sep 1, 2008
28
0
0
Central
#18
Maybe I'm being ignorant abt these; but as long as I know I wont be printing out my pictures for any size bigger than 5R; I wouldnt be too bothered with it.
Most times, my pictures will be uploaded in JPEG and in around 300 - 400 kb files; enough for the monitor and the eyes. Noise are negligible.. unless you'd go around blowing up pictures and pixel - spotting lah...
Hehehe.. agree on that point. But I am thinking along the line that there might be ways that I can improved on to take a better pic mah. And i fussy too lor.. :bsmilie:

BlackCloud :)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#19
Hehehe.. agree on that point. But I am thinking along the line that there might be ways that I can improved on to take a better pic mah. And i fussy too lor.. :bsmilie:

BlackCloud :)
Try borrowing a book on landscape and architecture photography from the library.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#20
Hmm.. I kinda like the colors of the flats and its lights together with the twilight sky. However, I dun feel its very satisfactory and there should be a better way of capturing it.
There you go then :) - You have already the impression that the picture lacks something. That's good and it's the right starting point. Be critical to yourself. Main question is always: what do you want to show? What's the purpose, main subject, message / story? Have you achieved the target?

Maybe the angles? or something that I can look out for? Maybe you guys can help suggest given the scenario what might be a better way of capturing it? Thanks. :)
You can check existing threads in the Landscape / Cityscape section. Plenty of pictures and guidelines there.
It's the same as with the maths about exposure time above: check for existing information and compare with your own knowledge.
 

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