Help on manual flash


chuanzuya

New Member
Nov 27, 2009
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#1
Ok this may sound noobish.. but can anyone help by educating me on how does manual flash works? auto flash or ttl flash seems pretty expensive.. so i can only afford a manual flash. But i have no idea how does it work :(
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#3
Just take note that if you are mounting the flash on your DSLR, make sure the flash is made for use with digital cameras.
 

Dream Merchant

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Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#4
There are quite a few old non-digital flash units that are safe to use with DSLRs, and it seems that different DSLRs have different triggering voltage limits.

Anyways, no details, how to help? We can't read minds or tell the future ...
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#5
There are quite a few old non-digital flash units that are safe to use with DSLRs, and it seems that different DSLRs have different triggering voltage limits.

Anyways, no details, how to help? We can't read minds or tell the future ...
I thought those were too rare to be considered. :sweat:
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#6
Define 'rare'. :)

There probably aren't that many around, but at any given time, you can get one that's usable on a DSLR. There are probably several hundred units floating around the world as we type.

Actually, coming to think about it, TS could easily consider getting an Auto/Manual unit. Some of the decently powered Sunpaks can be got for less than SGD100.
 

Feb 6, 2006
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#7
Heard that some older manual flash had high voltage discharge that will short the DSLR circuit :think:
Anyone care to confirm ?
 

aspenx

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#8
Heard that some older manual flash had high voltage discharge that will short the DSLR circuit :think:
Anyone care to confirm ?
We have already "confirmed" it......

Define 'rare'. :)

There probably aren't that many around, but at any given time, you can get one that's usable on a DSLR. There are probably several hundred units floating around the world as we type.

Actually, coming to think about it, TS could easily consider getting an Auto/Manual unit. Some of the decently powered Sunpaks can be got for less than SGD100.
Flashes that float are indeed RARE! :bsmilie:

Ok... I've nothing constructive I can contribute to this thread anymore...

I just remembered that there I have a Emoblitz flash lying around somewhere that works safely on DSLRs. TS might want to try his/her luck at flea markets. Just buy, then come home and check online whether it's safe or not. But if Sunpaks can be had readily for less than $100......
 

Edwin Francis

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2006
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#10
Define 'rare'. :)
Actually, coming to think about it, TS could easily consider getting an Auto/Manual unit. Some of the decently powered Sunpaks can be got for less than SGD100.
I did get a used Sunpak Auto 383 Super on B&S for $100. Later saw one going for even less ($75 IFRC). It's an old school auto/manual flash in the vein of the Vivitar 283 / 285 -- 3 Auto apertures and 5 manual settings. I did check the trigger voltage (on the list Dream Merchant linked, and directly), just to be sure.

TS, not sure if you know, but auto flashes like these do the flash metering themselves -- there's a small window in the front with a photosensor inside. No TTL, multi-pattern metering etc. You may find it a little limiting, or more flexible, depending on how you like to work.

BTW, do be careful when comparing available flashes with those on the trigger voltage list. Some of the model numbers are very similar. For e.g. the Vivitar 285 has a high trigger voltage that may fry your DSLR; the Vivitar 285 HV is low voltage.
 

divoloo

New Member
Feb 5, 2010
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#11
I've been using a $65 manual flash (Sunblitz A829 bought new at Orient Photo early this year) and have been getting fantastic shots bouncing off ceilings and walls.

I just put it to full power (only two settings anyway) and just vary the iso speed, shutter speed and aperture till I got it right. A bit of trial and error at first but after I've got the hang of it found that iso 400, f8 of bigger, 1/125 or about gets me the results I want indoors. With digital nowadays it's that simple, just do a few trial shots first with camera at full manual, get the desired exposure and fire away.
 

chuanzuya

New Member
Nov 27, 2009
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#12
anyway are yongnuo models such as 460 mk ii or 465 a nice manual flash to use?
 

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