help me :)


Janksta

New Member
Jan 12, 2012
1
0
0
#1
I'm a super noob. I've always loved photography and I am starting school at one of the art institutes later this year. I've been saving for a dslr camera but I don't know where to begin. First of all I LOVE MACROS. By far my favorite. But I have no idea where to begin. So my q is... I have pretty quick learning skills and I want something I will be able to grow into but not so complicated I wont be able to use it right away. I always loved Canon but the more I play around, the more I'm liking Nikon. Anybody have suggestions? And for the most basic of basics any ideas what your suggestions will cost? I will definitely need 2 different lenses. But other than that... no clue.

I glanced at the stickys to see what I could find but even the newbies here are more advanced than I am :'(
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
4,774
0
0
Bishan
www.flickr.com
#3
I'm a super noob. I've always loved photography and I am starting school at one of the art institutes later this year. I've been saving for a dslr camera but I don't know where to begin. First of all I LOVE MACROS. By far my favorite. But I have no idea where to begin. So my q is... I have pretty quick learning skills and I want something I will be able to grow into but not so complicated I wont be able to use it right away. I always loved Canon but the more I play around, the more I'm liking Nikon. Anybody have suggestions? And for the most basic of basics any ideas what your suggestions will cost? I will definitely need 2 different lenses. But other than that... no clue.

I glanced at the stickys to see what I could find but even the newbies here are more advanced than I am :'(
Try out the different brands of camera, do not limit yourself to just Canon or Nikon. After trying out the different models, see which brand has the ergonomics and button layout which you prefer. Don't force yourself to adapt to the camera, the controls placement should more or less make sense to you when you try it out.

For lenses, don't worry, the different brands all have what you need.
 

rhino123

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
5,243
15
38
NA
#4
I'm a super noob. I've always loved photography and I am starting school at one of the art institutes later this year. I've been saving for a dslr camera but I don't know where to begin. First of all I LOVE MACROS. By far my favorite. But I have no idea where to begin. So my q is... I have pretty quick learning skills and I want something I will be able to grow into but not so complicated I wont be able to use it right away. I always loved Canon but the more I play around, the more I'm liking Nikon. Anybody have suggestions? And for the most basic of basics any ideas what your suggestions will cost? I will definitely need 2 different lenses. But other than that... no clue.

I glanced at the stickys to see what I could find but even the newbies here are more advanced than I am :'(
To make it simpler for you... ask yourself these questions,

1) What do you want to shoot most - (you say you like macro, so take it as you would like to shoot macro.)
2) What other features do you need, eg, HD video, fast AF in live view mode, in-body image stabilization, a wide array of colour to choose from, fast continuous shooting speed, weather seal body, etc
3) Do you need vari-angle LCD (you know the LCD that you can twist and turn?)

After answering the three questions above, then you could more or less zoom in onto the brands of cameras that offer those features. Note that for some camera brand (eg, Canon and Nikon) they don't provide certain features no matter which camera models you go for... such as in-body image stabilization. And some model offer blazingly fast continuous shooting speed (like Sony's SLT camera - but with a slight light lost due to the SLT technology).

After you have zoom down on the brands of cameras that you are going for, read up on their models... then shortlist some models. Finally go down to the shops and request to have a feel of these models...

At that stage, take special note on the following,

a) Ergonomic of the camera - design of the grip, buttons layout, general feel of the camera in your hands.
b) Weigh - believe me this is very important... especially when you are going to carry the camera for a couple of hours at ends.
c) Menu Interface

Get the camera that you feel best with.

(one last note: get a camera that you feel best with and not a camera that has the most features, only get those that you really need and don't believe in getting a camera that most of your friends are using. The myth about lending ones equipment, lenses and stuff like that are nothing but myths... as very few people will be willing to lent out their photographic equipments.)
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,490
26
48
Pasir Ris
#5
So my q is... I have pretty quick learning skills and I want something I will be able to grow into but not so complicated I wont be able to use it right away.
This is somewhat contradicting. If you want snapshots then all cameras can do the job, the learning curve is not steep and it's not overly complicated to press one button. If you want to venture into photography then please adjust your expectations: there is a learning curve for taking picture, another one for operating your camera and learning what all the settings mean - and last but not least: Macro is a special topic that comes after you have learned the basics. I suggest to put the Macro topic on hold, get a camera and start shooting. The sticky threads mentioned above will give enough orientation to select a camera and there is no serious mistake one can do beside a) trusting a sales man's recommendation; and b) buying things you don't know.
Go shooting. Macros can wait.
 

fabskong

New Member
Mar 11, 2011
30
0
0
Toa Payoh, Singapore
#6
Agreed to above. Ask questions on what you like and what you need. Then can try out. Maybe rent?

"Macros can wait." I super like =D
 

Valkarian

New Member
Nov 28, 2011
276
0
0
26
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#7
My suggestion is to start with a camera and kit lens, shoot and enjoy trying of all kinds of shots! When you find your limitations then try to go one step further with an upgrade!
 

Frontiers

Deregistered
Nov 28, 2011
74
0
0
#8
I'm a super noob. I've always loved photography and I am starting school at one of the art institutes later this year. I've been saving for a dslr camera but I don't know where to begin. First of all I LOVE MACROS. By far my favorite. But I have no idea where to begin. So my q is... I have pretty quick learning skills and I want something I will be able to grow into but not so complicated I wont be able to use it right away. I always loved Canon but the more I play around, the more I'm liking Nikon. Anybody have suggestions? And for the most basic of basics any ideas what your suggestions will cost? I will definitely need 2 different lenses. But other than that... no clue.

I glanced at the stickys to see what I could find but even the newbies here are more advanced than I am :'(
cameras with inbuilt image stabilizer can most often be cheaper in a long run... if cost is a factor why not consider cheaper and equally good alternatives such as Pentax K-r?
 

bkling1

New Member
Oct 30, 2004
427
0
0
#9
Both nikon and canon will be alright..I have crossed and used both system. Both are equally good. Not to influent you, I finally stay with canon as I like to use other brand of manual focus lens. Canon will be a little bit flexible to adopt other lens with appropriate adapter..so basically I made my choice base on lens.
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
7,312
23
0
Earth
www.facebook.com
#10
Both nikon and canon will be alright..I have crossed and used both system. Both are equally good. Not to influent you, I finally stay with canon as I like to use other brand of manual focus lens. Canon will be a little bit flexible to adopt other lens with appropriate adapter..so basically I made my choice base on lens.
you're forgetting the Sony NEX system. it's basically even more flexible times 100 than the Canons are at mounting many other lenses via Adaptor.
 

Gigarex

New Member
Nov 5, 2011
198
0
0
#11
Last edited:

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
7,312
23
0
Earth
www.facebook.com
#12
Gigarex said:
Have you seen the size of the Sony A-Mount adaptor as compared to the body size?
http://reviews.photographyreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/A271854-2.jpg
Have you seen the adaptors for other brands of lenses? They're much smaller. It's not only the A-mount lenses you can adapt to the E-mount.

Also. The size and weight of that whole setup will still be smller and lighter than the Canons or Nikons
 

Top Bottom