help! errors galore.


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#1
i'm a newbie to photography.

recently, i brought my newly acquired 35mm SLR along for my holiday, hoping to experiment. needless to say, the shots were marred by my inexperience. throughout the entire trip, i'd forgotten to remove the polarizing filter at certain times. i wonder if this contributed to the final quality of the pictures. when do i use the filter, and when don't i use?

1. quite a fair number of shots had darkened corners. why?

2. i took multiple shots of same objects under same lightning conditions. but some of the sky color had a rich blue, while the picture in the next frame doesn't.

3. i used a 400 speed film to capture the dolphin and killer whale shows at sea world. the outcome was that the water was dark blue and blended in with the sky. the color contrast of the animals seemed to almost blend in with the water too. plus, the shots turned out grainy/ hazy. should i have used 200 speed film instead? lightning conditions were not bright sunlight, as the sky was a little overcast.

4. some sunset shots had an orange hue. while others were ok. how do i control this?

thanks in advance for any help!
 

Larry

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#2
Originally posted by kristlbel
1. quite a fair number of shots had darkened corners. why?
sounds like vignetting to me... what setup are u using? e.g. camera, lens and more imptly, filters. if you're stacking filters, like a UV and a polariser together, that might account for it.
 

#3
Originally posted by firefox13
sounds like vignetting to me... what setup are u using? e.g. camera, lens and more imptly, filters. if you're stacking filters, like a UV and a polariser together, that might account for it.
using a nikon f80 with the basic lens set that came along with the camera.

and yes, i stacked filters. UV and polarizer togather. i was told that it's ok to do so :(
 

megaweb

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#4
should be vignetting

for my EF 28-105mm lens ... if I use UV + polariser + 28mm focal length ... it will cause vignetting

recommended to remove the UV filter ..
 

Adam Goi

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#5
Originally posted by kristlbel
i'm a newbie to photography.

recently, i brought my newly acquired 35mm SLR along for my holiday, hoping to experiment. needless to say, the shots were marred by my inexperience. throughout the entire trip, i'd forgotten to remove the polarizing filter at certain times. i wonder if this contributed to the final quality of the pictures. when do i use the filter, and when don't i use?

1. quite a fair number of shots had darkened corners. why?

2. i took multiple shots of same objects under same lightning conditions. but some of the sky color had a rich blue, while the picture in the next frame doesn't.

2. i used a 400 speed film to capture the dolphin and killer whale shows at sea world. the outcome was that the water was dark blue and blended in with the sky. the color contrast of the animals seemed to almost blend in with the water too. plus, the shots turned out grainy/ hazy. should i have used 200 speed film instead? lightning conditions were not bright sunlight, as the sky was a little overcast.

3. some sunset shots had an orange hue. while others were ok. how do i control this?

thanks in advance for any help!
Hi kristlbel!

Could you post of the images which you've mentioned here so that we can better advise you?

Pictures still paint more than a thousand words...if not you can consider bringing your pics to one of our gatherings, I'm sure you'll get constructive feedbacks!
 

rueyloon

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#7
err.. which shop you sent for processing ? sound like a problem with the shop

ya, the number one ERROR you commited was to bring an unfamiliar camera with you on a trip.... you just broke the platinum rule. :p
 

rueyloon

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#9
Originally posted by kristlbel
i'm a newbie to photography.

1. quite a fair number of shots had darkened corners. why?

were you stacking filters ?

stacking filters is like adding a toilet roll tube to the front of your camera, that's why the dark corners = vignetting

but you were also using a polariser, it sometimes gives and uneven lighting across the photos.
 

currahee

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#10
so always dun stack filters rite?

is there any diff in the darkness of the polarizer at diff parts of the lens?
 

YSLee

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#11
Lemme guess, you were using print film? :D Kodak MAX 400? :p
 

rumraisin

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#12
The thing about the sky being a richer blue-- isn't that what's supposed to happen when you have a polarising filter? I think the blueness depends on how much you rotate the filter as well as direction of sun and stuff...
 

#14
Originally posted by YSLee
Lemme guess, you were using print film? :D Kodak MAX 400? :p
yeah :p i bought 8 rolls of Kodak 200 film here, but forgot to bring 4. had to buy the extra Kodak 400 film during my trip, as somehow the Kodak 200 film was abt 2 USD more expensive than the MAX 400 film.

And I thought that they used to tout Kodak 200 film as the 'general purpose' film. Now it's the MAX 400.
 

mpenza

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#15
Originally posted by kristlbel


yeah :p i bought 8 rolls of Kodak 200 film here, but forgot to bring 4. had to buy the extra Kodak 400 film during my trip, as somehow the Kodak 200 film was abt 2 USD more expensive than the MAX 400 film.

And I thought that they used to tout Kodak 200 film as the 'general purpose' film. Now it's the MAX 400.
Touting and reallife performance are 2 different issues altogether. Max 400 is know to give grainy output and color reproduction.
 

#16
Originally posted by rueyloon
err.. which shop you sent for processing ? sound like a problem with the shop

a singapore color centre outlet at PSA bldg. i suppose that the grainy-ness could be attributed to the fact that i was using a higher speed film also. although i still can't explain why some of the pictures made with the same roll of film turned out alright. :dunno:
 

Larry

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#17
Originally posted by kristlbel
i suppose that the grainy-ness could be attributed to the fact that i was using a higher speed film also. although i still can't explain why some of the pictures made with the same roll of film turned out alright. :dunno:
there's actually a lot of reasons why your pixs turned out grainy or under/overexposed... try to note your settings next time when you shoot off a few rolls, that way you'll know where you went wrong and what to avoid. a bit hard for anyone to advise you on what went wrong...
 

#18
Originally posted by firefox13
there's actually a lot of reasons why your pixs turned out grainy or under/overexposed... try to note your settings next time when you shoot off a few rolls, that way you'll know where you went wrong and what to avoid. a bit hard for anyone to advise you on what went wrong...

i used Program (auto) mode :p
 

Larry

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#19
why don't you try Adam's advice and post some of the more problematic pixs up? then better for everyone to looksee and give 2 cents worth... :D
 

T

Trevor_Tan

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#20
Originally posted by kristlbel
i'm a newbie to photography.

recently, i brought my newly acquired 35mm SLR along for my holiday, hoping to experiment. needless to say, the shots were marred by my inexperience. throughout the entire trip, i'd forgotten to remove the polarizing filter at certain times. i wonder if this contributed to the final quality of the pictures. when do i use the filter, and when don't i use?

1. quite a fair number of shots had darkened corners. why?

2. i took multiple shots of same objects under same lightning conditions. but some of the sky color had a rich blue, while the picture in the next frame doesn't.

3. i used a 400 speed film to capture the dolphin and killer whale shows at sea world. the outcome was that the water was dark blue and blended in with the sky. the color contrast of the animals seemed to almost blend in with the water too. plus, the shots turned out grainy/ hazy. should i have used 200 speed film instead? lightning conditions were not bright sunlight, as the sky was a little overcast.

4. some sunset shots had an orange hue. while others were ok. how do i control this?

thanks in advance for any help!
I'm not a expert, just share what I know:

1) Vignetting. as what all had said and I agreed with that. I believe the polarizing filter you had is quite thick so will cause vignetting (esp at wider end of your lens)

2) Well if you still had the polarizing filter on, it could be your cause. Turning the polarizing filter at different angle will give different colour constrast, certain angle will give a richer color or a nicer sky blue. Taking picture from different angle from the light source (the sun) with polarizing filter on will also give different sky tone.

3) Regarding the blending thingy, I don't really understand but the grainy might be caused by the ISO 400 Kodak film. But again, if you choose a ISO 200 film, you may not get a good shots if the dolphin and killer whale moves too fast in poor light condition. So it not always a win-win thing here, best if you know the condition b4 hand.

4) This I also don't know what you mean, need to see the pictures.
 

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