hdr?


Status
Not open for further replies.

isoparm

New Member
Oct 4, 2009
8
0
0
#1
would appreciate anything about hdr :)
 

Sep 6, 2009
526
0
0
#2
Hi what exactly do you wanna know? A simple wikipedia search will give you basic information on it- about widening the dynamic range etc

if you want to know how to do it, just google "hdr how to" or "hdr cs X" where X is your version of photoshop. hope it helps
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#3
You can google "what is HDR" or "how do i do HDR".

Best way to learn is to do your own footwork.
 

gimumancer

New Member
Sep 15, 2009
237
0
0
#4
would appreciate anything about hdr :)
try this at your home, at noon where the sun is the harshest, shoot a nearby building from your window but include some of your interior things in your frame (like window frame, curtain etc..), if you spot meter the building, the building's exposure will be ok but your interior will be underexposed, if you spot meter your interior, the building will be overexposed but your interior is ok..(you'll get different results with matrix metering depending on your composition that's why you need to use spot metering) now why is it that our eyes can see both having good exposures? building is ok, interior is ok..it's because our eyes are capable of high dynamic range while our camera sensor cannot, now that's when HDR photography comes in, with HDR, you will combine all exposures and "try" to get just the good exposures so that we can get good exposures for both the interior and the building, because of this you will need to take at least 3 exposures, with our example, take 1 underexposed (building ok, interior dark),1 overexposed (building blown out, interior ok) and 1 mid exposure..take the RAW pictures, combine them and process as HDR in photoshop or photomatix, the software will be using some sort of algorithm to "try to get only the good exposures", after they are combined, its output can be a 32bit or 16bit image..now you still need to fine tune this to properly display in our monitor, that's when tone mapping comes in, currently photomatix is the best at doing this, just tweak your settings using photomatix, some people however are overdoing it thus the pictures are ending too cartoonish..

some cameras have AEB (auto exposure bracketing like d5000,d90 etc..), this AEB setting will automatically get the 3 exposures for you, if you have a very high continuous frame rate shooting (d5000 is 4fps), you won't need a tripod to get 3 exposures if light source is ok and you can get all 3 shots in under 1 sec, just set to AEB setting and continuous burst mode, photoshop will try to align the image for you..if you you don't have AEB, you will need a tripod, just manually adjust your exposure setting, don't use shutter priority as exposure compensation will adjust your aperture and thus you'll have different depth of fields for your 3 pictures...

HDR works best for landscapes where there is a high amount of contrast (shadows like area under trees,leaves,bridge and bright spots like sky), also works for waterfalls as the water is reflective and are usually blown out..
 

Last edited:

isoparm

New Member
Oct 4, 2009
8
0
0
#6
thanks for your quick replies, everyone. i'll try gimumancer's suggestion at home and check out jtsky's links and tutorials.
i don't have photomatix yet but i think i can manage with photoshop...
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom