Hdr


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ReiszRie

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Oct 15, 2006
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#3
so do i use the bracketing feature of my cam or should i manually adjust the shutter for different exposure values? if i'm taking a shot of lets say a busy street at dusk, would the lag between each shot of exposure affect the eventual outcome outcome of the photo? is there a general rule of thumb of how long one should take to complete the shots of multiple exposures?

thanks.... havent got a chance to really try it out yet
 

Big Kahuna

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Dec 15, 2004
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#4
I usually use bracketing. I guess it's OK to do manual adjustment but I think it's very difficult not to shift the lens even if you have a very stable tripod :sweat: It's very common for HDR if your object is moving, like a motion picture.....I have some sample.....because I did it hand held and the leaves on the tree was swaying....so the final output becomes not so sharp :sweat:

 

VR2

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Dec 17, 2005
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#5
i also use bracketing.. + burst shoot.. minimise the handshake..
hope it helps..
 

ReiszRie

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#6
ahh, so it does seem that HDR isn't a very practical method.... hmmm it'll probably be worse if i'm taking a busy street during dusk, you'll get lotsa blurring which isn't very much like blurring caused by long shutter.... in other words kinda ugly blurrings
 

glennyong

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May 2, 2004
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#7
anyway. please do a search within the forums...

HDR has been discussed before recently only.... last month IIRC.
 

wind30

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#8
I never bracket. One exposure captured in RAW. Then developed (WITHOUT exif, impt else CS2 will not work) at maybe -3 -1 and +1. Then merge using the HDR function in CS2.

Or just develop into a 16bit tiff and apply levels with masking.
 

wind30

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#9
I never bracket. One exposure captured in RAW. Then developed (WITHOUT exif, impt else CS2 will not work) at maybe -3 -1 and +1. Then merge using the HDR function in CS2.

Or just develop into a 16bit tiff and apply levels with masking.

examples
The foreground is totally in the shade, no sunlight while the sun is shining fully on the white clouds. Notice the details even in the brightest portion of the clouds



Second example.
The sky is MUCH brighter than the reflection on the black road. This picture is basically a HDR merge of three exposures -3, -1 and +1 stops of one single raw file. Unedited so it looks a bit dull but all the details from the light and dark regions are there. Should look better with some level masking.
 

wind30

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#10
BTW, I am using s3pro. The RAW file of s3pro has is 14bitsx2=28bits while most other DSLRs is only 12bits.
 

wind30

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#13
can also be done with 2 frames with 2 exposures

beautiful. The problem with 2 frames is that the scene must be static. no wind, no moving trees, etc. Not to mention that you have to have a tripod...

Basically don't we all want a camera that can capture the entire range from dark to light in one raw file?
 

eikin

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Apr 27, 2004
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#14
beautiful. The problem with 2 frames is that the scene must be static. no wind, no moving trees, etc. Not to mention that you have have a tripod...

Basically don't we all want a camera that can capture the entire range from dark to light in one raw file?
working with 2 files offer more flexibility in terms of the range of editing that can be done before image quality gets affected negatively.

i offer it as an option. the frame i wanted is wider than what my widest lens can take, therefore 2 frames, and because of that 2 exposures. whether HDR is used or not, composition must always come first. HDR is afterall an effect, not an end :)
 

ReiszRie

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#15
lol, i got stuck at the stage where you need to adjusts the curves in CS2 prior to having the final image, can't figure out how to do it well there xD
 

wind30

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#17
working with 2 files offer more flexibility in terms of the range of editing that can be done before image quality gets affected negatively.

i offer it as an option. the frame i wanted is wider than what my widest lens can take, therefore 2 frames, and because of that 2 exposures. whether HDR is used or not, composition must always come first. HDR is afterall an effect, not an end :)
ya lar. Your pictures are really very nice and you have higher photographic standards (not sacarstic :) )

For me, photography is basically snapping my wife on my holidays and HDR is basically getting backlited subjects to come out ok. not with a burnt out skies but with beautiful blue skies and white clouds with details and form. I seldom have the leisure or time on my holidays to set up tripod and neither can my wife hold still for that long to take multiple exposures.

So the best I can do is single RAW file exposure on the widest dynamic range camera I can afford.
 

eikin

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Apr 27, 2004
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#18
ya lar. Your pictures are really very nice and you have higher photographic standards (not sacarstic :) )

For me, photography is basically snapping my wife on my holidays and HDR is basically getting backlited subjects to come out ok. not with a burnt out skies but with beautiful blue skies and white clouds with details and form. I seldom have the leisure or time on my holidays to set up tripod and neither can my wife hold still for that long to take multiple exposures.

So the best I can do is single RAW file exposure on the widest dynamic range camera I can afford.
thanks ... i never say your method is wrong. i'm only offering another way of doing it yah?
 

ReiszRie

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Oct 15, 2006
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#19
so should i do a single exposure of 2 exposure shots or varying EV? how much difference should the EV be between 2 shots?

i'm using a Nikon D80
 

eikin

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Apr 27, 2004
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#20
so should i do a single exposure of 2 exposure shots or varying EV? how much difference should the EV be between 2 shots?

i'm using a Nikon D80
it depends on the amount of contrast present in the situation.

RAW files allow up to +/-2, but best within the range of +/- 1.

at +/- 2 i find image quality starting to get difficult to control.

therefore, there are times when shooting 2 exposures can help.

add: if you shoot a single frame with 2 different exposure values in RAW file format, you actually expand the range possible for post processing.
 

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