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HDR Test


gkw12345

New Member
Aug 10, 2009
297
0
0
#1
Hey guys,

My first time doing HDR using Photoshop CS5~
I would like to know if this is considered over-doing it, or is it still acceptable?
Any comments and critique is welcomed ;D

If I post at wrong section, sorry leh
Not to sure which section supposed to be~
Mods, if wrong section, plz help me shift it to the right one
Thanks!

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Jul 2, 2010
180
0
0
#2
Hey guys,

My first time doing HDR using Photoshop CS5~
I would like to know if this is considered over-doing it, or is it still acceptable?
Any comments and critique is welcomed ;D

If I post at wrong section, sorry leh
Not to sure which section supposed to be~
Mods, if wrong section, plz help me shift it to the right one
Thanks!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

[/url]
[/IMG]
hmmm whats the point of doing the hdr here? i dont see how it helps the picture...the greens from the leaves look extremely fake. hdr is not just taking any photo and apply it and hope to achieve a good picture..
 

ovaltinemilo

Senior Member
Sep 12, 2009
2,819
0
36
Sin jia Po lah
#3
if u r having prob with the skies, there are a couple of ways to do it like blending exposure or lift shadow etc.. If this is suppose to be a test of doing HDR, I would say yes, overdo...look around.. you only find highlights and grey tones with extremely little shadow around...this makes the photo flat... just my 2 cents.
 

gkw12345

New Member
Aug 10, 2009
297
0
0
#4
hmmm whats the point of doing the hdr here? i dont see how it helps the picture...the greens from the leaves look extremely fake. hdr is not just taking any photo and apply it and hope to achieve a good picture..
Hmmm... I wanted to do HDR here cos I wanted to be able to see the detail in the sky~
Or am I doing it wrong?
 

gkw12345

New Member
Aug 10, 2009
297
0
0
#5
if u r having prob with the skies, there are a couple of ways to do it like blending exposure or lift shadow etc.. If this is suppose to be a test of doing HDR, I would say yes, overdo...look around.. you only find highlights and grey tones with extremely little shadow around...this makes the photo flat... just my 2 cents.
o_O What's that?
Newb here ^^
 

Jul 2, 2010
180
0
0
#6
did you actually blend different exposures or just use the "hdr toning"? and yes i agree with ovaltinemilo the picture is really very flat. hdr is for increasing dynamic range, which means technically you should have a high dynamic range which includes a broad spectrum of the shadows and highlights.
 

KY1977

New Member
Jan 3, 2008
947
0
0
#7
Need to go easy on saturation. IMHO, not too overly done, just need to work on the contrast.
 

gkw12345

New Member
Aug 10, 2009
297
0
0
#8
did you actually blend different exposures or just use the "hdr toning"? and yes i agree with ovaltinemilo the picture is really very flat. hdr is for increasing dynamic range, which means technically you should have a high dynamic range which includes a broad spectrum of the shadows and highlights.
Hmmm...
I'm not to sure what you mean, but I did use 3 different photos with 3 different exposures~
Urhmmm... what does 'flat' mean? :confused:
Need to go easy on saturation. IMHO, not too overly done, just need to work on the contrast.
Oh ok. Thanks!
 

theRBK

Senior Member
May 16, 2005
2,048
1
0
#9
Urhmmm... what does 'flat' mean? :confused:
I believe what people mean by flat regarding the above image is that the shadows and highlights are not contrasty enough relative to each other... in that image, the shadows are not really dark enough... I understand that you want to keep all the detail visible, and that was the point of using HDR... on the other hand, shadows and highlights still have to "look" as if they are shadows and highlights... try to use curves or some other tool to try to add a bit more contrast and deepen the shadows in the image and that would look fine...

if you're using Photoshop CS5 for your image, in "Merge to HDR Pro" option you could do this by choosing the output "Mode" as "16 Bit" or "8 Bit" and then using "Local Adaptation" and the "Curve" tab to give it the added contrast... if you want to process to "32 Bit" first and then convert it to 16 or 8 Bit later, then when you are converting, use the "Method" called "Local Adaptation" and the "Toning Curve and Histogram" option to do the same... these two methods would give the better toning results than if you were to convert the image to 16 Bit or 8 Bit in some other mode and the use curves or some other method to do the contrast later on with the 16 Bit or 8 Bit image...
 

sinned79

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2009
10,868
3
0
Singapore
www.aboutlove.sg
#10
this is a type of photo that does not requires to be HDR-ed

Hint: Look for colorful/contrasty subjects if u want HDR photos.
 

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