HDR Landscape. Help !


Mar 13, 2011
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#1
I really want to know if most photographer would HDR their landscape photos ?
How to make landscape photos look even more dramatic?
Do your just leave the landscape photo just as it is ?
What must i do to HDR landscape photos ? Example : Sunrise shots or sunsets.
 

Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
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#2
It's definitely not a must.

Lifted from Wikipedia:
"In image processing, computer graphics, and photography, high-dynamic-range imaging (HDRI or just HDR) is a set of techniques that allow a greater dynamic range of luminance between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods. This wide dynamic range allows HDR images to more accurately represent the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, ranging from direct sunlight to faint starlight."

If you want to capture sunrise or sunset with the landscape in silhouette. You probably won't need HDR.
 

dxsibo

New Member
Mar 10, 2004
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#3
I really want to know if most photographer would HDR their landscape photos ?
- really depend on what and how you want to capture the landscape because not everything when do hdr will come out nice.


How to make landscape photos look even more dramatic?
-normally up contrast but there are many other ways as well

Do your just leave the landscape photo just as it is ?
- for me i will usually touch up in ps

What must i do to HDR landscape photos ? Example : Sunrise shots or sunsets.
-more touch up work to be done in cs, like how u wan the clouds to be like, the colour and everything
 

sinned79

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Jun 18, 2009
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#4
i dun do HDR. cos i know i sucks at it. on and off i will attempt one or two when I think there is a need but i definitely dun HDR-ed all my photos.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#5
I suck at post-processing. so I prefer to get it "right" in-camera. :p
 

Akatsuki

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Mar 2, 2008
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#6
really want to know if most photographer would HDR their landscape photos ?
most of my photography peers don't HDR their landscape photos, it really depend if there's enough contrast in a scene to make the HDR stand out in the first place

How to make landscape photos look even more dramatic?
beside HDR, you can play with the channels as well

Do your just leave the landscape photo just as it is ?
usually will touch up and tweak the channels

What must i do to HDR landscape photos ? Example : Sunrise shots or sunsets.
You can go on to youtube and find some video tutorial to follow, they definitely can explain better than me here :)
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
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#8
I really want to know if most photographer would HDR their landscape photos ?
How to make landscape photos look even more dramatic?
Do your just leave the landscape photo just as it is ?
What must i do to HDR landscape photos ? Example : Sunrise shots or sunsets.
I HDR only when it is required these days. In the past when using the old Pentax K100D with a very limited dynamic range, I HDR a lot. Still, I tried to keep things true to the eye. There are situations where other tools like GND will not help, due to the nature of the scene.

An alternative to HDR is exposure blending. This involves stacking photos in layers and erasing the relevant areas to make sure the parts you want exposed based on the correct photographic exposure are revealed accordingly.

Some recent situations where I had to use HDR, usually relevant to cityscapes - if you use a GND you will darken even the buildings.


(3 stop GND used, still need to bracket 3 exposures +1 EV in between)


(2 stop GND used, with 3 exposures, 1 EV in between)


(2 stop GND used, can't remember information)


(HDR from single RAW exposure)

HDR set
Digital Blending set

Hope this helps.
 

SkyStrike

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Staff member
Nov 29, 2010
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#11

allenleonhart

Deregistered
Sep 17, 2008
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#12
I tot one of these photo is a prize winner??


so is my understanding correct? that exposure blending ensures an even exposure through out, while hdr keeps the relative brightness of the dark regions and bright regions the same, while getting more detail into them?

enlighten me pls:)
 

tweakmax2

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Apr 15, 2003
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#13
Yep. I read. However, is it my normal shot photos can use HDR software to get the effect. Or must I take 2 photos of the same scene with over and under exposure
 

SkyStrike

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Staff member
Nov 29, 2010
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#14
Yep. I read. However, is it my normal shot photos can use HDR software to get the effect. Or must I take 2 photos of the same scene with over and under exposure
HDR usually requires 3 (or at least 2) shots with different exposure (as in +-EV). I've seen many use 1 raw file to do HDR too...but debates goes on to say using 1 raw file is not HDR...
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
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#16
so is my understanding correct? that exposure blending ensures an even exposure through out, while hdr keeps the relative brightness of the dark regions and bright regions the same, while getting more detail into them?

enlighten me pls:)
I'm not sure about how HDR works, but suffice to say, they try to achieve the same ends. I'm not sure that I'm interested in finding out how they get there, actually, or if it even matters to me as a photographer. :)
 

allenleonhart

Deregistered
Sep 17, 2008
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#18
I'm not sure about how HDR works, but suffice to say, they try to achieve the same ends. I'm not sure that I'm interested in finding out how they get there, actually, or if it even matters to me as a photographer. :)
erm. what is the end? cause i'm still kinda lost with regards to this.

if lets say, exposure blending, i get the bright as not so bright, dark as not so dark, ie: it seems well exposed throughout.

but hdr: the brights are still brights, darks are still darks, just that i can see more details in them.

is it correct? cause if thats the case, its 2 really different ends for 2 different reasons why i might use them...
 

wakaowalao

New Member
Sep 23, 2005
705
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#19
I HDR only when it is required these days. In the past when using the old Pentax K100D with a very limited dynamic range, I HDR a lot. Still, I tried to keep things true to the eye. There are situations where other tools like GND will not help, due to the nature of the scene.

An alternative to HDR is exposure blending. This involves stacking photos in layers and erasing the relevant areas to make sure the parts you want exposed based on the correct photographic exposure are revealed accordingly.

Some recent situations where I had to use HDR, usually relevant to cityscapes - if you use a GND you will darken even the buildings.


(3 stop GND used, still need to bracket 3 exposures +1 EV in between)


(2 stop GND used, with 3 exposures, 1 EV in between)


(2 stop GND used, can't remember information)


(HDR from single RAW exposure)

HDR set
Digital Blending set

Hope this helps.

I thought the last pic was by night86mare? Are you saying that this simage is taken by you?
 

foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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singapore
#20
erm. what is the end? cause i'm still kinda lost with regards to this.

if lets say, exposure blending, i get the bright as not so bright, dark as not so dark, ie: it seems well exposed throughout.

but hdr: the brights are still brights, darks are still darks, just that i can see more details in them.

is it correct? cause if thats the case, its 2 really different ends for 2 different reasons why i might use them...
Exposure blending is really down to the photographer to making decisions where to brighten and darken.
Photodoto Exposure Blending Tutorial

whilst HDR is usually a program which will automatically blend exposures and produce results based on the photographer's tone mapping settings.
Stuck in Customs HDR Tutorial

Different tools for same/different results. All depends on the user.
 

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