Happiness In Their Broken World


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pplneedthelord

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Sep 18, 2007
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serangoon
#1


400D, tamron 17-50.
shot at 47mm, f/2.8, iso 800

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Hi all,

i just got back on monday from a 8 day mission trip to malacca, malaysia. my main purpose of the trip was not photographing but rather to spread the word so i only took about 800+ photos. i was really touched to see that even though these malacca kids come from really broken families, they are still so happy. no one would ever know the pain they've gone through of losing a parent.

anyway, one day while the kids were playing a game which involved some running, i decided to attempt to do some panning. it was my first attempt so i'll hope you guys could give some advice on my future panning shots.

thank you.

(the rest of the photos are on my flickr site. link is below)
 

kritikosN1

Deregistered
Nov 6, 2008
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#2
Shutter speed too fast and focal range too low to be called a panning shot.

Broken families does not relate to unhappy children, they do not need your pity. You are just having a bias mindset fix into your mind.

Picture is to focus to this one child, it looks like a group game, you could have shot a wider one to include everyone. Color is too saturated as well.

1/10, for the candid smile
 

pplneedthelord

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2007
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serangoon
#3
Shutter speed too fast and focal range too low to be called a panning shot.

Broken families does not relate to unhappy children, they do not need your pity. You are just having a bias mindset fix into your mind.

Picture is to focus to this one child, it looks like a group game, you could have shot a wider one to include everyone. Color is too saturated as well.

1/10, for the candid smile
how would you know the specific shutter speed i used? it wasn't even mantioned. i'm not going to go off topic to debate with you but yes thank you for the comment.
 

chiangkxv

Senior Member
Jul 5, 2008
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Tiong Bahru
www.flickr.com
#4
how would you know the specific shutter speed i used? it wasn't even mantioned. i'm not going to go off topic to debate with you but yes thank you for the comment.
FYI, the exif data can be obtain from ur flickr

Exposure:0.033 sec (1/30)
Aperture:f/2.8
Focal Length:47 mm
ISO Speed:800
Exposure Bias:0/3 EV
Flash:Flash did not fire
 

pplneedthelord

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2007
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serangoon
#5
FYI, the exif data can be obtain from ur flickr

Exposure:0.033 sec (1/30)
Aperture:f/2.8
Focal Length:47 mm
ISO Speed:800
Exposure Bias:0/3 EV
Flash:Flash did not fire
fair enough.

but i've seen other threads. the shutter speeds told to use for panning were 1/30. so i did it as followed.
 

Dream Merchant

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
9,659
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#6
No one shutter speed works for all panning situations.

It's relative to the velocity at which the subject is moving, as well as the pependicular angle the subject is moving in relation to the position of the camera.

In this situation with kids running at relatively slow speeds (as compared to say a race car, speed boat or jet plane), I would try to go as low as possible that would still render the main subject sharp. Probably something in the region of 1/10 - 1/4 or even 1/2, depending on one's technique and skill level, as well as the regularity of the subject's path of motion.

It's all relative, and like real life, a guide is (usually) not sancrosanct.
 

pplneedthelord

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2007
2,173
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serangoon
#7
No one shutter speed works for all panning situations.

It's relative to the velocity at which the subject is moving, as well as the pependicular angle the subject is moving in relation to the position of the camera.

In this situation with kids running at relatively slow speeds (as compared to say a race car, speed boat or jet plane), I would try to go as low as possible that would still render the main subject sharp. Probably something in the region of 1/10 - 1/4 or even 1/2, depending on one's technique and skill level, as well as the regularity of the subject's path of motion.

It's all relative, and like real life, a guide is (usually) not sancrosanct.
noted. thank you. :)
 

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