Hallo, I'm new in this forum, and want to learn more.


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onsoon

New Member
Mar 4, 2006
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Tampines
#1
Hallo, I'm new in this forum, and want to learn more. Just bought my first SLR (probably a DSLR) Nikon D50 a month ago. And I hope the experienced kaki in this forum can teach me some tips of choosing of other essential affordable weapon as below:-

1) Tripod
2) Wide-angle lens (prefer those for shooting Landscape)
3) Macro lens
4) Whoever have any outing of any occassion, please bring me along to learn

Thank you very much.
 

DumbDoDo

New Member
Jan 25, 2006
193
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0
Do Do land
#3
onsoon said:
1) Tripod
2) Wide-angle lens (prefer those for shooting Landscape)
3) Macro lens
4) Whoever have any outing of any occassion, please bring me along to teach

Thank you very much.
Hi onsoon

Welcome to Clubsnap ! !

Just sharing my views for your reference. I'm using a D70s.

1) Tripod - for me, I got myself a Manfrotto 728B tripod at $90(new).
2) Wide-angle lens - I am planning to get the Tokina 12-24 f4 lens, heard that its good.
3) Marco lens - currently using a Sigma 70-300mm APO Macro, still using, has no intention to upgrade ... yet:)
4) Outing - do keep a lookout at the Expeditions, outing folder, many shooting outings there.

Hope the info is helpful, do browse around in the forum, you will learn alot here. ;)
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#4
onsoon said:
Hallo, I'm new in this forum, and want to learn more. Just bought my first SLR (probably a DSLR) Nikon D50 a month ago. And I hope the experienced kaki in this forum can teach me some tips of choosing of other essential affordable weapon as below:-

1) Tripod
2) Wide-angle lens (prefer those for shooting Landscape)
3) Macro lens
4) Whoever have any outing of any occassion, please bring me along to teach

Thank you very much.

Tripod? Buy one which suits your needs. But generally, get the heaviest one which you can handle as it will be rock steady stable. Also you need to check the height which it extends to, make sure it can accomodate your height.

As mentioned, the Tokina 12-24 is a good suggestion which have been advised to me too...

Macro lens is a specialized one, it all depends on how much magnification you are looking at, the ones on the market now are generally 1:1 ratio, if you need higher magnification, then consider using extension tubes or using reverse lens setups.

Outings? Just read for them in the different sub-sections.


Cheers,
 

onsoon

New Member
Mar 4, 2006
39
0
0
Tampines
#7
Thank you very much, you guys are really kind & active, 请多多指教 :) :) .
 

Koelsch

Senior Member
Jan 5, 2006
1,454
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0
The Land of the Teddy Bear
#9
i'm also very active during the day. and night.

but i don't own any cameras yet =(. no money buy. but i have some little knowledge that i learned from the ppls here.
 

onsoon

New Member
Mar 4, 2006
39
0
0
Tampines
#10
DumbDoDo said:
Hi onsoon

Welcome to Clubsnap ! !

Just sharing my views for your reference. I'm using a D70s.

1) Tripod - for me, I got myself a Manfrotto 728B tripod at $90(new).
2) Wide-angle lens - I am planning to get the Tokina 12-24 f4 lens, heard that its good.
3) Marco lens - currently using a Sigma 70-300mm APO Macro, still using, has no intention to upgrade ... yet:)
4) Outing - do keep a lookout at the Expeditions, outing folder, many shooting outings there.

Hope the info is helpful, do browse around in the forum, you will learn alot here. ;)
Hi DumdDoDo, thanks for your reply & advice, appreciate. Where is the good place to get Manfrotto tripod here?:) 请多多指教.
 

onsoon

New Member
Mar 4, 2006
39
0
0
Tampines
#11
zac08 said:
Tripod? Buy one which suits your needs. But generally, get the heaviest one which you can handle as it will be rock steady stable. Also you need to check the height which it extends to, make sure it can accomodate your height.

As mentioned, the Tokina 12-24 is a good suggestion which have been advised to me too...

Macro lens is a specialized one, it all depends on how much magnification you are looking at, the ones on the market now are generally 1:1 ratio, if you need higher magnification, then consider using extension tubes or using reverse lens setups.

Outings? Just read for them in the different sub-sections.


Cheers,
Hi Michael Lim, Thanks for your reply & advice, look like the Tokina Lens is the most recommended one. For Macro lens, I think need to learn more before I get one. 请多多指教.:)
 

fWord

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2005
3,350
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0
35
Melbourne, Australia
#12
Welcome, and glad you could join us! :)

Don't know a lot, but I'll try to help in a limited way:

1. Tripod: Many types, sizes and brands available and of course, at wildly varying prices. Some of the cheap but large ones, such as the Mora one that I use only cost me $35 from Sim Lim Square. One member here once showed me an Akarui tripod/ monopod (around $90) that uses a ball head capable of handling weights of up to 4kg, which is quite sufficient for the average shooter. Your choice will depend on what your shooting habits are. For example, bird and sports photographers will use larger and heavier lenses, and hence need a sturdier support. Even a very small tripod is useful, and way better than having none at all. However, if you don't mind using railings, dustbins or ledges as support, you may be able to do without one for some time. But if you're interested in night/ long exposure photography, it is recommended that you try to get your hands on one. Others will be able to advice you better on this issue. But try not to spend too much unless you're really sure you need one, and can use it often enough to justify the cost.

2. Wide-angle lens: Not too familiar with these for a Nikon body, however I've read good things about the Tokina 12-24mm f/4. Other options would be the Sigma 10-20mm and Sigma 12-24, Tamron 11-18mm (?) and the Nikon 12-24mm. Still, use your kit lens for now and decide if you really want to go wider than that on a regular basis. For some shooters, the kit lens will probably be wide enough.

3. Macro Lens: Consider the Tamron 90mm f/2.8, Sigma 105mm f/2.8 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8. These are true macro lenses that offer a 1:1 reproduction ratio of your subject. That is to say that the image reproduces your subject at life size. As you can see, the focal lengths differ, and your choice of macro lens would depend on what you want to photograph. Flighty subjects like butterflies and dragonflies might need a longer focal length while flowers and more tolerant subjects may only need the Tamron 90mm. Besides that I've also read that it's best to pursue insect photography earlier in the day when it is cool and most insects are still resting, so it's easier to get a shot on them than when they're active later in the day, or otherwise hiding from the heat.
 

onsoon

New Member
Mar 4, 2006
39
0
0
Tampines
#13
fWord said:
Welcome, and glad you could join us! :)

Don't know a lot, but I'll try to help in a limited way:

1. Tripod: Many types, sizes and brands available and of course, at wildly varying prices. Some of the cheap but large ones, such as the Mora one that I use only cost me $35 from Sim Lim Square. One member here once showed me an Akarui tripod/ monopod (around $90) that uses a ball head capable of handling weights of up to 4kg, which is quite sufficient for the average shooter. Your choice will depend on what your shooting habits are. For example, bird and sports photographers will use larger and heavier lenses, and hence need a sturdier support. Even a very small tripod is useful, and way better than having none at all. However, if you don't mind using railings, dustbins or ledges as support, you may be able to do without one for some time. But if you're interested in night/ long exposure photography, it is recommended that you try to get your hands on one. Others will be able to advice you better on this issue. But try not to spend too much unless you're really sure you need one, and can use it often enough to justify the cost.

2. Wide-angle lens: Not too familiar with these for a Nikon body, however I've read good things about the Tokina 12-24mm f/4. Other options would be the Sigma 10-20mm and Sigma 12-24, Tamron 11-18mm (?) and the Nikon 12-24mm. Still, use your kit lens for now and decide if you really want to go wider than that on a regular basis. For some shooters, the kit lens will probably be wide enough.

3. Macro Lens: Consider the Tamron 90mm f/2.8, Sigma 105mm f/2.8 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8. These are true macro lenses that offer a 1:1 reproduction ratio of your subject. That is to say that the image reproduces your subject at life size. As you can see, the focal lengths differ, and your choice of macro lens would depend on what you want to photograph. Flighty subjects like butterflies and dragonflies might need a longer focal length while flowers and more tolerant subjects may only need the Tamron 90mm. Besides that I've also read that it's best to pursue insect photography earlier in the day when it is cool and most insects are still resting, so it's easier to get a shot on them than when they're active later in the day, or otherwise hiding from the heat.
Hi fWord, many Thanks for your precious & useful advice, be grateful fo that, 请多多指教.:)
 

drakko

New Member
Jan 6, 2006
371
0
0
Singapore
#14
onsoon said:
Hallo, I'm new in this forum, and want to learn more. Just bought my first SLR (probably a DSLR) Nikon D50 a month ago. And I hope the experienced kaki in this forum can teach me some tips of choosing of other essential affordable weapon as below:-

1) Tripod
2) Wide-angle lens (prefer those for shooting Landscape)
3) Macro lens
4) Whoever have any outing of any occassion, please bring me along to learn

Thank you very much.

welcome to the club.
you can learn a lot of tips and tricks from here.
i'm a newbie too, and my shifu (is that correct spelling) is from a rival brand! really learning a lot from him
 

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