Guide Mode in 3100


mikesclee

New Member
Mar 22, 2005
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Jurong
#1
Tried the Blur function in Guide Mode but seem it's totally useless:

1. When trying to get more Blur effect, I can't see anything in liveview.

2. Shouldn't the screen display how much of Blurring everytime I adjust the bar. If I can see everything while zooming in or out, why this Blurring effect doesn't work the same way?

3. Was told that I have to take a shot and see the result. If not happy, try adjusting the blurring until satisfied. What a crap.

4. Why can't it have WYSIWYG in the screen before shooting? This should also apply for Motion & Contrast effect too. Shouldn't the camera already know and display the end result everytime an adjustment (f-stop, shutter speed, ISO,etc) is made and pressing the shutter is basically the same as pressing the Enter key in a laptop.

5. Apparently, Canon 600D have the same problem.

My previous Oly EP-L1 have the same function and the DoF works but because of it's smaller sensor, I can't see much changes. That's why I'm looking at DSLR that have the same function. Just want an easy to use DSLR without having to know anything about f-stop, shutter speed, etc. Only need some prime lens and that should work for me. Currently using Sony A33 (like the Panorama feature) and hope it's new replacement will have a guide mode that can do what I want. Just need a good DSLR with zero learning curve. PnS & Prosummer cameras are just not good enough.
 

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Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
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#2
I dunno abt the technical difficulty but I seriously dun think a WYSIWYG capability a very impt thing. The guide mode guides you to achieve your shot. If it gets you the shot that you want, wouldn't it have served its purpose?

The guide mode was introduced so that ppl with no idea how to use DSLR, or I should say, photography, have an exposure to the fundamental 3 components triangle which they do not when they were using their point and shoot.
 

luna_sea83

Senior Member
Jul 17, 2005
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#3
If you are looking for a DSLR with zero learning curves, i suggest you to look back at PnS.

No matter how simple a dslr is able to work, you are still expected to learn as you shoot to achieve the effects that you need. The guide mode is just there to help you understand better and guide the user to better photos with some learning curves.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,645
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lil red dot
#4
TS if you want to shoot good pictures with dslr you need to understand how it is done. DSLR is not 'crap' but the next step up for photographers who want more control over settings and focal length. If you just want shoot and not know anything about shutter speed, aperture and iso, you should go back to the EPL1. If you want a larger sensor, move to the Sony NEX series. Sounds like DSLR is not a fit for you.
 

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brapodam

New Member
Jun 12, 2009
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#5
There are much better online tutorials that work better than the confusing guide mode on the D3100. Go Google for some basic photography tips, you will learn much more from those as compared to the half-baked guide mode.
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
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#7
Wow TS, you have joined this forum since 2005, long enough to be a senior member and you did not read the useful contents on this forum regarding photography basics? If you don't want to learn or read up, maybe a PnS is a better option for you.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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0
rainy Singapore
#8
WYSIWYG.......... hahahaha what a joke :D
sounds like the kind of person who lets his maid carry his fullpack.... ;)

DSLR with zero learning curve... my goodness

Please go and read the sticky threads written by hardworking and generous CSers, that explain the concept of the exposure triangle. Maybe then you'll realize that taking a photo is not like hitting the enter key on the keyboard.
 

Ahtim78

New Member
Nov 3, 2010
212
0
0
#9
Just need a good DSLR with zero learning curve.
Hi TS,
Since u Just need a good DSLR with zero learning curve then i suggest u to use the Auto mode or scene mode in your D3100

U mention u can't get the blur effect right? Then i suggest u turn your Mode Dial to Portrait mode and there u can get your blur effect.

That's why there is fully automatic mode in DSLR for people like u "Just need a good DSLR with zero learning curve".

Hope this may help u.
 

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seezhijie

New Member
Nov 8, 2010
628
0
0
Malaysia
#10
Tried the Blur function in Guide Mode but seem it's totally useless:

1. When trying to get more Blur effect, I can't see anything in liveview.

2. Shouldn't the screen display how much of Blurring everytime I adjust the bar. If I can see everything while zooming in or out, why this Blurring effect doesn't work the same way?

3. Was told that I have to take a shot and see the result. If not happy, try adjusting the blurring until satisfied. What a crap.

4. Why can't it have WYSIWYG in the screen before shooting? This should also apply for Motion & Contrast effect too. Shouldn't the camera already know and display the end result everytime an adjustment (f-stop, shutter speed, ISO,etc) is made and pressing the shutter is basically the same as pressing the Enter key in a laptop.

5. Apparently, Canon 600D have the same problem.

My previous Oly EP-L1 have the same function and the DoF works but because of it's smaller sensor, I can't see much changes. That's why I'm looking at DSLR that have the same function. Just want an easy to use DSLR without having to know anything about f-stop, shutter speed, etc. Only need some prime lens and that should work for me. Currently using Sony A33 (like the Panorama feature) and hope it's new replacement will have a guide mode that can do what I want. Just need a good DSLR with zero learning curve. PnS & Prosummer cameras are just not good enough.
1) Liveview works like the viewfinder. I hope you don't suppose the liveview mode on DSLRs work like those you find on every digital camera. DSLRs never display the final result before releasing the shutter (not by digital means)

2) You can see everything when you zoom in and out because the focal length changes. DSLRs can't change the laws of physics you know.

3) That's how photographers work, and with some experience, we can get the right lighting on the first try (with the light meter of course). Why else do you think even student photographers are paid like $20 per hour? I wouldn't have been so harsh if you didn't say it's crap.

4) It's built for serious photographers, so it's not made to have the camera know the end results. It's made for the photographer who knows the end results. Yes, the shutter button is like an enter key on a keyboard. But you don't push it unless you know what you've typed.

5) Every DSLR has the same "problem"

No DSLRs have zero learning curve. Even the auto mode requires you to know whether you want auto focus or manual focus. If PnS and Prosumers aren't good enough for you, then sad to say maybe DSLRs are too good for you. Btw even the most experienced photographer carries a PnS around sometimes for ease of use. A few prime lenses? You sure you know what's so nice about them that we don't mind the single focal length?
 

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mikesclee

New Member
Mar 22, 2005
200
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Jurong
#11
I've taken shots with my A33 using the Sony 35mm f1.8 and Sigma 14-70 f2.8 in Auto mode and they always turn out better than my Sony HXV5 and Fuji HX10. My previous Olympus E3 with the 12-60 SWD was even better but find it too heavy. Was visting my son in US last January and I tried his girlfriend's Canon 5D Mk2 with the 24-70L lens, the result was fantastic. The snow covered walkway and cars really look very realistic in spite of the environment being very gloomy. Shots taken with the 5D in New Orleans also looks fantastic. It better be since it cost almost 4 times more than my A33. Hence, I believe DSLR still gives better result. I do attend photography classes and those free lessons given by Sony, Canon and Olympus when purchasing their cameras. Just that I never bother to practice using what I've learned. Expect the hardware to do the job.

Nobody have so far given me, in layman term, why is it not technically possible to see the final output in liveview. They all tell me it's not possible, but can't explain why. Asked a few sales guy at Funan and they all says that this function is too new and they don't know how to use it. I'm surprise that in today's advancement in processors and AI technology, we still can't achieve such a task.
 

seezhijie

New Member
Nov 8, 2010
628
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Malaysia
#12
coz in a DSLR's liveview, the shutter opens up and exposes the sensor to light. the sensor will then convert the light it receives into an image on the LCD screen, instantaneously. if you set a shutter speed of 30 seconds and does light painting there, you can't possibly see the results first-hand. here's a simple example of light painting https://msfarrelldigitalimagery4.wikispaces.com/file/view/Light-Graffiti-Michael-Bo-002.jpg/89796443/Light-Graffiti-Michael-Bo-002.jpg you can't digitally increase the DoF either since it's done by closing down the Aperture. besides, DSLRs are built for serious photographers. sometimes the cause for under or overexposed photos can't be detected through liveview mode, so it's up to the naked eye to do the job. like i said, it's built for serious photographers after all.

Canon 5D Mk2 with 24-70L lens? It's an L lens of course you'll get amazing results. You don't bother practicing what they've taught you either, so don't go around saying some things are crap. Expect the hardware to do the job? Everyone can be a photographer then. And btw, the way you're posting here is like posting "Sony or Konica-Minolta better?" in the Sony/Konica-Minolta forums.
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
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www.flickr.com
#13
Its somewhat possible if you use the DOF preview button. For now you cannot see the real extent of blurring because the aperture is always wide open. It only closes before the shot. To see the extent of the blurring, hold down the DOF preview button to see how its like.

The preview button is usually next to the lens at the bottom right hand corner when you are holding it. If still unsure, check your manual.
 

mikesclee

New Member
Mar 22, 2005
200
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0
Jurong
#14
Thanks Spree86 for the clear explanation. Will try it out. May now consider the CZ1680 lens or just get the same 5D Mk2 with 24-70L camera. What's Nikon equivalent of the Canon configeration.
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
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#15
Thanks Spree86 for the clear explanation. Will try it out. May now consider the CZ1680 lens or just get the same 5D Mk2 with 24-70L camera. What's Nikon equivalent of the Canon configeration.
That would be the D700 with 24-70 f2.8 but it would be good to at least know a bit of basics before upgrading, FF cameras do not work wonders by themselves.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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rainy Singapore
#16
Its somewhat possible if you use the DOF preview button. For now you cannot see the real extent of blurring because the aperture is always wide open. It only closes before the shot. To see the extent of the blurring, hold down the DOF preview button to see how its like.

The preview button is usually next to the lens at the bottom right hand corner when you are holding it. If still unsure, check your manual.
D3100 has no DOF preview button.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#17
Its somewhat possible if you use the DOF preview button. For now you cannot see the real extent of blurring because the aperture is always wide open. It only closes before the shot. To see the extent of the blurring, hold down the DOF preview button to see how its like.

The preview button is usually next to the lens at the bottom right hand corner when you are holding it. If still unsure, check your manual.
D3100 has no DOF preview button.
 

seezhijie

New Member
Nov 8, 2010
628
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0
Malaysia
#20
Anyway, just know that higher end digital cameras produce better image. But higher end DSLRs don't, at least not automatically. Just because you have a SGD10,000 DSLR doesn't means you'll get SGD10,000 quality.

Another thing is that when you hold your son's girlfriend's DSLR, she might already have the accurate settings done for you. That's what I do for my juniors in CCA too. If you use auto, the results will probably be just as terrible. Also note the Nikon equivalent of the lens is one of Nikon's best. I believe same goes for Canon.

But all in all, since you just want something you can point and shoot and get wonderful results, then look up some high quality PnS. It's why they're called PnS anyway. Point n Shoot. If you want more shallow depth of field, try zooming in to around 100mm (?) on your PnS before snapping. PnS cameras tend to have a really wide angle lens fixed on them, so no matter how shallow your DoF is, they still tend not to show the effect unless you zoom in.
 

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