grainy photos


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919956g

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#1
i notice that some picturess, especially those taken at niiight tends to have be grainy ;subject don't seem to be clear.The film i commonly load into my eos 88 r kodak gold 400 n fuji superia.Did the problem lies on the film i use or lens not being good enough or due to the printing quality, if so, how can i justify the problem?
 

ckiang

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#2
Originally posted by 919956g
i notice that some picturess, especially those taken at niiight tends to have be grainy ;subject don't seem to be clear.The film i commonly load into my eos 88 r kodak gold 400 n fuji superia.Did the problem lies on the film i use or lens not being good enough or due to the printing quality, if so, how can i justify the problem?
You probably have underexposure. When that happens, the lab will try to correct for it - resulting in increased grain. Kodak Max 400 is also very, very grainy to begin with. The Fuji should be pretty okay.

Regards
CK
 

Larry

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#3
you shoudl try shooting fuji press 800 film, for low light situations. if you're talking about those city landscape pixs, try shooting ISO 100 film on a tripod using very long exposure time (like more than 1 minute)
 

Kit

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#4
Originally posted by firefox13
you shoudl try shooting fuji press 800 film, for low light situations. if you're talking about those city landscape pixs, try shooting ISO 100 film on a tripod using very long exposure time (like more than 1 minute)
Long exposures doesn't necessary have to be more than a minute. Depending on how much you stop down the lens. Usually I keep it to around f8 and a shutter speed of about 8 to 20 secs.
 

MaGixShOe

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#6
Originally posted by Kit


Long exposures doesn't necessary have to be more than a minute. Depending on how much you stop down the lens. Usually I keep it to around f8 and a shutter speed of about 8 to 20 secs.
wats the advantage of using a smaller apeture like f8?
 

Kit

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#7
Originally posted by MaGixShOe
wats the advantage of using a smaller apeture like f8?
When using a smaller aperture(bigger f number), you get a less shallow dof(depth of field). Your subjects will be sharper overall. This is more evident with film cameras from what I can tell.
 

MaGixShOe

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#8
Originally posted by Kit


When using a smaller aperture(bigger f number), you get a less shallow dof(depth of field). Your subjects will be sharper overall. This is more evident with film cameras from what I can tell.
so can say that its more for distant landscape photography then use small apeture

if for closer night shots like taking ppl using slow synchro flash then use a bigger apeture?


anyway i find that for my digital cam using f4-5 yields the best results in terms of brightness to shutter speed (longer shutter speed needed for a smaller apeture leads to more hot pixels in digicam) :gbounce:
 

Kit

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#9
Originally posted by MaGixShOe
so can say that its more for distant landscape photography then use small apeture

if for closer night shots like taking ppl using slow synchro flash then use a bigger apeture?


anyway i find that for my digital cam using f4-5 yields the best results in terms of brightness to shutter speed (longer shutter speed needed for a smaller apeture leads to more hot pixels in digicam) :gbounce:
It depends on what kind of effect you want to achieve. For portraits, you might want your subjects to be in focus and throw the background out of focus, then use a larger aperture. Try to experiment and see which one you like best.

Distant does not govern the aperture to be used as well. I've shot 95% of my shots in f8 irregardless of distance. But then, my subjects are buildings and details. Again, it depends on your subject and what you want to achieve.
 

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919956g

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#10
From samuel (also coded as 919956G),
white grainy spots were also seen in contrasting dark areas on the pix...(areas I intentionally wanted dark...). Is that also due to the compensation done for underexposure during the process of print, if so, does it mean that mass commercial printing is lousy and i should take on coarses on developin my own pix...care to recommend, any one?
From samuel (also coded as 919956G),
thanx for the knowledge U guys had generously contributed, to repay U guys, i will promise to digest them thoroughly.n apply wisely....
 

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