Gradient ND filter with lowest cost?


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dRebelXT

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#1
I only need one for my 17-40mm, so what is the lowest cost solution? :confused:
TIA
 

yyD70S

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#3
Low cost GNDs are prone to having colour cast, ie, not neutral colour.
 

dRebelXT

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#4
Thank you catchlight and yyD80S.

What is the cost of a Cokin holder and one piece of ND filter (shooting blue sky)?

Do I need some kind of graduated filter when shooting airplanes at noon? I think the
top half and bottom half will have large difference in lightening.
 

yyD70S

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Dec 25, 2005
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#5
dRebelXT said:
Thank you catchlight and yyD80S.

What is the cost of a Cokin holder and one piece of ND filter (shooting blue sky)?

Do I need some kind of graduated filter when shooting airplanes at noon? I think the
top half and bottom half will have large difference in lightening.
Sorry but I don't know the prices but I don't think you need a GND to shoot airplanes assuming you are pointing at the sky, ie, filling the whole frame with the airplane as foreground and the sky as a background. On the contrary, you may need an ND filter.

Unless, you meant during takeoffs and landings where your background would include part sky, part others.

Usually, in our climate, a 3-stop ND or GND is ideal.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#6
dRebelXT said:
Thank you catchlight and yyD80S.

What is the cost of a Cokin holder and one piece of ND filter (shooting blue sky)?

Do I need some kind of graduated filter when shooting airplanes at noon? I think the
top half and bottom half will have large difference in lightening.
graduated filter is not a magic filter, beware that you will underexpose the airplane if compose the airplane into the top half.

Btw, you should take metering WITHOUT the filter.
 

dRebelXT

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Well, in the case of landed airplanes like 747, 380, etc. How do I make sure the upper portion
and lower portion are equally exposed? I will be going to the show at Changi in late morning,
expecting quite bright & vertical sunshines.
 

yyD70S

Senior Member
Dec 25, 2005
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#8
dRebelXT said:
Well, in the case of landed airplanes like 747, 380, etc. How do I make sure the upper portion
and lower portion are equally exposed? I will be going to the show at Changi in late morning,
expecting quite bright & vertical sunshines.

OK. I can concur now that you it's the GND that you need.

As in any GND, you meter the brightest portion of the subject; in this case, the sky. And you do the same for the foreground; the airplanes, I suppose. If the difference is huge and is greater than what your DSLR can handle, you need to balance it with the appropriate GND.

You can do a search for Singh-Ray or Lee Filters on Google and read on further.
 

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