good potrait


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kitty2

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Apr 21, 2005
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#1
Hello ...
I know I am not so good when asking to take photo.
Currently I am using canon powershot A80.
When wanted to take potrait (object clear with blurr background) than
just simply rotate cam's switch to potrait mode but how come the result
it is not so blurr compare with my male colleague.
His photo result much better (object clear with blurr background). :(
Is it due to camera brand ? what is AV and TV ?

BTW, He is using nikon coolpix 3MP

Pls advice
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#2
simple version, zoom in to the maximum and make sure the background is far away from the person, also if the person is closer to the camera the background will be more blur.
 

~Arcanic~

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Feb 27, 2005
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#3
kitty2 said:
Hello ...
I know I am not so good when asking to take photo.
Currently I am using canon powershot A80.
When wanted to take potrait (object clear with blurr background) than
just simply rotate cam's switch to potrait mode but how come the result
it is not so blurr compare with my male colleague.
His photo result much better (object clear with blurr background). :(
Is it due to camera brand ? what is AV and TV ?

BTW, He is using nikon coolpix 3MP

Pls advice
Not sure about is it caused by e brand.. I would say more on the cam's functions.. :)

Anyway, Av stands for Aperture Mode
Tv stands for shutter Piority Mode

General rule would be to use the smallest Av (f stop number) the cam allows to take a pic of main subject in focus and background is blurred out. But how much e background is blur out is also dependable on the distance between you and your subject also. ;)
 

tunster

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Oct 26, 2003
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#4
It's hard to achieve blurred backgroudn (shallow depth of field) from A80. I have one myself and because of that, I upgraded to a DSLR camera.The actual cause is the small sensor size and the real focal length of the small lens. Unless you are doing macro mode or using a background real far away (and the subject is much closer to the lens like 2m), you can forget about blur background
 

student

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Jul 26, 2004
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#5
~Arcanic~ said:
General rule would be to use the smallest Av (f stop number) the cam allows to take a pic of main subject in focus and background is blurred out.
I hope you do not mind me making a slight clarification. Not terribly important, but can be confusing.

When one says "use the smallest aperture (av) one usually means the smallest "hole", which means the "highest number", not the "smallest number"

Meaning the "smallest Av" would be something like f22 or beyond depending on the lens. On some of my lenses, the "smallest Av" goes to F125.

What you obviously meant was to use the "biggest aperture" the lens is capable of - such as f2.8 or "bigger". Other lenses may be f2.0, f1.8, f1.4, f1.2, f1, or even f0.95!
 

student

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Jul 26, 2004
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#6
And to kitty2.

"Good" portrait has nothing to do with the blurred background. "Good" portrait is a "good" image of a person. Sometimes the background may be distracting and an ability to blur that out may be desirable. But it has nothing to do with the main image of the person.
 

Speed

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Jul 25, 2003
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#7
student said:
I hope you do not mind me making a slight clarification. Not terribly important, but can be confusing.

When one says "use the smallest aperture (av) one usually means the smallest "hole", which means the "highest number", not the "smallest number"

Meaning the "smallest Av" would be something like f22 or beyond depending on the lens. On some of my lenses, the "smallest Av" goes to F125.

What you obviously meant was to use the "biggest aperture" the lens is capable of - such as f2.8 or "bigger". Other lenses may be f2.0, f1.8, f1.4, f1.2, f1, or even f0.95!

Well said. I feel people nowadays don't really bother about using the correct terms anymore. It is good to make it known before more people make the same mistakes and still think it doesn't matter.
 

Speed

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Jul 25, 2003
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#8
student said:
And to kitty2.

"Good" portrait has nothing to do with the blurred background. "Good" portrait is a "good" image of a person. Sometimes the background may be distracting and an ability to blur that out may be desirable. But it has nothing to do with the main image of the person.
Anyway, "good" is hard to define because different person has different perception.
 

kitty2

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Apr 21, 2005
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#9
ortega said:
simple version, zoom in to the maximum and make sure the background is far away from the person, also if the person is closer to the camera the background will be more blur.
Hi Ortega,
Meaning, I need to stay back from object (keep far distance) than zoom in
to the max (object will be "bigger") than use highest number of Av ?
So "malu" to ask again :embrass:
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#10
To get the blurest background that your camera can get

1. Set to AV mode and the biggest aperture that your camera has (eg F2.8)
2. zoom in (bigger image) to the max (eg 100mm)
3. position subject as far away from the background as possible
4. go as close to your subject as possible (composition wise)

try it and let us know if it works
I do not know your camera so this is in theory only
 

kitty2

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Apr 21, 2005
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#11
ortega said:
To get the blurest background that your camera can get

1. Set to AV mode and the biggest aperture that your camera has (eg F2.8)
2. zoom in (bigger image) to the max (eg 100mm)
3. position subject as far away from the background as possible
4. go as close to your subject as possible (composition wise)

try it and let us know if it works
I do not know your camera so this is in theory only
If I stand close to my subject as possible than how can I zoom-in
to the max ? :confused:
 

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