Glass photography


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Cap_Dingo

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Apr 25, 2006
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#1
Hi all

Need to take a photo of my fully glass trophy before it goes to sit in my company's cabinet. Given that its fully glass, I've had lots of problems how to take a photo of it - the angles (coz its 3D), and lighting in particular. Has anyone had experience doing this before, and is there a method for taking such a photo? Tried doing a search but couldn't find any tips.

Thanks! Andrew
 

urbanhype

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Dec 12, 2005
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#2
a black background maybe? with lights... just a suggestion...
hope it helps...
 

Deadpoet

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Oct 18, 2004
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#5
Hi all

Need to take a photo of my fully glass trophy before it goes to sit in my company's cabinet. Given that its fully glass, I've had lots of problems how to take a photo of it - the angles (coz its 3D), and lighting in particular. Has anyone had experience doing this before, and is there a method for taking such a photo? Tried doing a search but couldn't find any tips.

Thanks! Andrew
Still Life photography. That's where you will get your answer. However, knowing a few still life photographer, and how they lit their subjects, this is definately a job for strobes. Ambient light is not likely to work.
 

Aug 10, 2006
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#6
hmmm try this:
spotlights shining upward and towards the front, from the base of the trophy. of course the spotlight itself shld be at the back base of the trophy.
shld be able to light up the glass and provide an interesting effect:)

just my 2 cents worth..
 

yqt

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Sep 8, 2004
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#7
It would be better if we can have an idea of how the trophy looks like, but generally speaking, I would use back light as the main light source. Keep a distance so as to aviod blown edges. Black cards at the side slightly back of subject and reflectors in front. If there're wordings/a plate w/words in front, add a bounce light against the reflector.

Hope it helps.
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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Feb 15, 2003
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#8
It would be better if we can have an idea of how the trophy looks like, but generally speaking, I would use back light as the main light source. Keep a distance so as to aviod blown edges. Black cards at the side slightly back of subject and reflectors in front. If there're wordings/a plate w/words in front, add a bounce light against the reflector.

Hope it helps.

think easier, if dunno how to shoot, time is a constrain, engage professionals to do it...
 

Cap_Dingo

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Apr 25, 2006
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#9
I know this is a crappy pic, but I just couldn't get it better than this yesterday. Used a black t-shirt to get the effect - nothing else black around the house. The top is a globe and the bottom has engraving.

Any more ideas?

 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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Feb 15, 2003
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#13
Those examples are SUPER! But errr... newbie here... how to do it leh??? someone got a website with angles, and how many lights etc? Can it be done "DIY" at home?
can... but dunno your skill level... 1 light, 1 cloth should be enuff... problem is, how powerful is your light.
 

#14
glass not easy to shoot but the last time i had one such project i lit from the front and the back and added two black flags by the side to define the edges.

also, work in as dark an environment as i could to cut down on reflection. had lots of black crepe cloth all over the place.



 

Cap_Dingo

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Apr 25, 2006
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#15

Nice.... so it looks like the light at the back is stronger than at the front. Does this also apply since my object is fully transparent glass? Transparency makes it difficult?
 

#16
Nice.... so it looks like the light at the back is stronger than at the front. Does this also apply since my object is fully transparent glass? Transparency makes it difficult?
front light stronger than back light. actually one thing i learn was that the quality of the glass affects the brillance of it. glass with too much lead not too good.

for the back light i suggest u diffuse it, u dun need it harsh.
 

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