Gitzo vs Manfrotto


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koayst

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Dec 29, 2006
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#1
Has anyone out there has any usage experience for both Gitzo and Manfrotto monopod?

What i would like to know is which lock system do you prefer and why.

The Gitzo's twist and lock OR Manfrotto's click lock?
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#2
Different people have different opinions. Gitzos are more expensive than Manfrottos but both give the same feel and function IMO. So i went with Manfrotto cos it's value for money.
 

nuxnewbie

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Nov 2, 2006
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Different people have different opinions. Gitzos are more expensive than Manfrottos but both give the same feel and function IMO. So i went with Manfrotto cos it's value for money.
wah kaoz. I can see how you accumulate > 5,000 posts.

Generally, twist locks are more secure than flip locks. Twist locks 'wrap' around the joints (imagine each section being grasped and secured by your hand); flip locks secure the joints at only two points (imagine each section being pinched and secured by two fingers).

Flip locks deploy faster than twist locks - the increased speed is due to both design (flip locks are 'binary' - loose or tight, whereas twist locks need to be completely loosened before deploying) and the fact that flip locks are more 'loose' (see above) - it is entirely possible to flip open all the locks and 'flick' the monopod open.

However, the speed advantage is not all that great. I have the Manfrotto 680B monopod and the Gitzo 3530 tripod. The Gitzo twist locks unlock with only a very slight flick of the wrist (no need for open jam jar type of movement). Another slight flick of the wrist and they lock really, really tight.

The Manfrotto 680B is adequate for 2~3kg loads, although it is rated to 10kg. Mine started to 'compress' once loaded with a 300mm 2.8 w/1.4 extender and a 1-series cam. Needless to say I'll be looking for a new monopod with twist locks (maybe a Benro) soon.
 

Feb 23, 2004
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#4
I've been using Manfrotto 055B for a few years and then switch to an old Gitzo G320 for medium and large format photography.

To summarize my experience, if you want to get a tripod for life, buy Gitzo!


Regards
Tachi..
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#5
I used to have an older version of the Manfrotto 055 Pro but one fine day i fell while standing and as a result broke its plastic strap bracket. I've sold it to my friend and guess what....i've bought another 055 ProB which is a newer gen.
 

oeyvind

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Feb 25, 2002
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#6
The Manfrotto 680B is adequate for 2~3kg loads, although it is rated to 10kg. Mine started to 'compress' once loaded with a 300mm 2.8 w/1.4 extender and a 1-series cam. Needless to say I'll be looking for a new monopod with twist locks (maybe a Benro) soon.
680 is fine with 600/4 or 400/2.8 & 1 series.... all you need to do is make sure u adjust the tension properly with the supplied tools once in a while.

Twist Lock is good but is a bit slow to deploy.
 

photobum

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#7
To summarize my experience, if you want to get a tripod for life, buy Gitzo!
My Manfrotto lasts me more than 10 years now. Supported a large format, medium format, 35mm SLR and DSLR; not a single problem so far. However, my experience with Gitzo is different. One of the legs of my carbon fiber tripod cracked during a trip to Yosemite.
 

nuxnewbie

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Nov 2, 2006
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#8
680 is fine with 600/4 or 400/2.8 & 1 series.... all you need to do is make sure u adjust the tension properly with the supplied tools once in a while.

Twist Lock is good but is a bit slow to deploy.
Hmm... if it's good enough for the 400 then it's good enough for any lens. Now I need to find a really small nut driver...
 

Prismatic

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Feb 25, 2003
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#9
I personally prefer the click lock, though click locks seem to wear out a bit fast. I had broken locks or bolts for some of the manfrottos I had before.

Just a sidenote, Gitzo and Manfrotto actually belongs to the same company, but they maintain separate production lines.
 

Deadpoet

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Oct 18, 2004
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Generally, twist locks are more secure than flip locks. Twist locks 'wrap' around the joints (imagine each section being grasped and secured by your hand); flip locks secure the joints at only two points (imagine each section being pinched and secured by two fingers).

Flip locks deploy faster than twist locks - the increased speed is due to both design (flip locks are 'binary' - loose or tight, whereas twist locks need to be completely loosened before deploying) and the fact that flip locks are more 'loose' (see above) - it is entirely possible to flip open all the locks and 'flick' the monopod open.

However, the speed advantage is not all that great. I have the Manfrotto 680B monopod and the Gitzo 3530 tripod. The Gitzo twist locks unlock with only a very slight flick of the wrist (no need for open jam jar type of movement). Another slight flick of the wrist and they lock really, really tight.

The Manfrotto 680B is adequate for 2~3kg loads, although it is rated to 10kg. Mine started to 'compress' once loaded with a 300mm 2.8 w/1.4 extender and a 1-series cam. Needless to say I'll be looking for a new monopod with twist locks (maybe a Benro) soon.
I found your information totally misleading.

Both twist and flip locks are equally secured, asuuming they are being worked/stressed under normal condition and they are being maintained.

One advantage of the twist is that they do not "snatch" onto things. There are lots of belts, straps and alike around a photographer. However, no matter what, a flip lock is easier to open becuase you have leverage while a twist lock is by friction.

If your 10KG rated Manfrotto can only handle 2-3KG, then it's a problem with the tripod. Have you made adjustment to the lock mechanism to make them tighter? they do then to get looser over time. I have a 15 years old Manfrotto, the locks need to be adjusted once every other year!
 

nuxnewbie

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Nov 2, 2006
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#11
I found your information totally misleading.

Both twist and flip locks are equally secured, asuuming they are being worked/stressed under normal condition and they are being maintained.

One advantage of the twist is that they do not "snatch" onto things. There are lots of belts, straps and alike around a photographer. However, no matter what, a flip lock is easier to open becuase you have leverage while a twist lock is by friction.

If your 10KG rated Manfrotto can only handle 2-3KG, then it's a problem with the tripod. Have you made adjustment to the lock mechanism to make them tighter? they do then to get looser over time. I have a 15 years old Manfrotto, the locks need to be adjusted once every other year!
Yes, I do agree with you that if a support is rated @ X kg, it doesn't matter if it is flip lock or twist lock, we only need to look at the rated weight loading.

My comment on twist locks being more secure stems from my experience with the flip lock monopod and twist lock tripod.

My flip lock monopod now has tiny grooves etched by the lock mechanism and it will probably not be as secure.

As to flip locks being easier to open - the new Gitzo twist locks open with less than a 5 degree flick of the wrist (ok, maybe more than 5 degress, but only a slight turn of the wrist is required) - same speed or faster than flip locks - at least compared to the 680B. Try it and I'm pretty sure you will change your comment on flip locks being easier to open.

It's great that your Manfrotto tripod works well even after 15 years. Mine failed within 6 months, so I suppose personal anecdotes aren't going to help the TS. For what it's worth, I do find Manfrotto equipment to be rather greasy right out of the box.
 

Deadpoet

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Oct 18, 2004
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#12
6 months and it failed? Warranty issue. Should have brought it back. I had taken apart the flip lock mechanism for servicing. You should not see any grooves or uneven indentation from the pressure. Hmm ... maybe the workmanship, QC and material quality is no longer the same.

Personally, I found the Gitzo more difficult to operate.
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#13
Has anyone out there has any usage experience for both Gitzo and Manfrotto monopod?

What i would like to know is which lock system do you prefer and why.

The Gitzo's twist and lock OR Manfrotto's click lock?
Monopod? a nice solid wooden broom stick will also do the trick
Just as long as you do not need it to retract to a smaller size
 

Ah Kiat

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Jun 21, 2007
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#14
Manfrotto is more than enough for most conditions lah but be aware that the click locks HURT if you accidentally have a finger (or even a tiny bit of a finger) in there while you're closing the locks. This is from personal experience! The click lock is alot more convenient than Gitzo's twist lock though.
 

wong1979

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Aug 16, 2005
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#15
I find that a 4 section regular-sized Gitzo tripod very convenient. With 1 hand, and a gentle twist on the 3 rubber grips, all grips are loosen and sections can be retracted fast. Twist from the top down, 1,2,3 and its done.

Contracting is even easier. Twist 1,2,3, place hand from bottom end, push up, and twist the 3 grips at one go, and u r done.
 

denniskee

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Oct 26, 2003
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#16
i had used geotoes - twist (wrong spelling) and manfrotto - cilp monopod, i find the twist type very slow.

fyi, manfrotto monopod and tripod comes with a tiny box spanner for adjusting the tension of the clip locking device.
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#17
I personally prefer the click lock, though click locks seem to wear out a bit fast. I had broken locks or bolts for some of the manfrottos I had before.

Just a sidenote, Gitzo and Manfrotto actually belongs to the same company, but they maintain separate production lines.
One actually bought the other. I don't know which way round. Gitzo was French and Manfrotto was Italian.
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#18
Different people have different opinions. Gitzos are more expensive than Manfrottos but both give the same feel and function IMO. So i went with Manfrotto cos it's value for money.
The Chinese and Taiwanese clones are even cheaper. ;p
 

Prismatic

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#19
One actually bought the other. I don't know which way round. Gitzo was French and Manfrotto was Italian.
That never happened. It's a myth actually.
Both were bought over by Vitec Group Plc (Which is British I believe). Manfrotto in 1989 and Gitzo in 1992.
 

Deadpoet

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Oct 18, 2004
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#20
The Chinese and Taiwanese clones are even cheaper. ;p
the knock offs are definately cheap, and they are cheaply made too ... if you are using yoru PnS with it, why not, but if you are thinking of putting a few KG and a few thousand of dollars on it, be my guess.
 

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