Gary Fong Lightsphere II Cloud or Clear for newborn baby


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shark

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Sep 25, 2003
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#1
Hi Guys,

Would like your feedback on which is better for newborn baby?

Gary Fong Lightsphere II (Cloud)
Gary Fong Lightsphere II (Clear)
 

jeanie

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May 19, 2005
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#3
Hi Guys,

Would like your feedback on which is better for newborn baby?

Gary Fong Lightsphere II (Cloud)
Gary Fong Lightsphere II (Clear)
i believe a flash is a flash.really doesnt matter clear or cloud.both will hurt newborn's eyes.
use natural light if you can.

what i do is i turn on the modelling light (from studio flash) and i use that as primary light source
 

shark

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Thanks!

Noted, So you guys don't recommend even if I use a diffuser?
 

catchlights

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#6
no research studies, no articles by paediatricians ever mention flash is harmful to baby eyes,
just use your common sense, don't aim direct, use ceiling bounce.
 

seankyh

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#7
no research studies, no articles by paediatricians ever mention flash is harmful to baby eyes,
just use your common sense, don't aim direct, use ceiling bounce.
Absolutely correct. Common sense. It may not have been published in any articles but I don't take chances with newborns. You never know.
I shoot with 50mm 1.4 + available light from the window. If shutter speed cannot be fast enough, I will use higher ISO.
 

wanzw

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#8
i wouldn't like the idea of using a flash. imo a fast prime will be more useful!

but if were to choose i will get the cloud version. the light will be softer.
 

roygoh

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#9
Using the lightsphere still presents a somewhat concentrated source of light to the baby, no doubt less intense than direct.

Try bouncing off the ceiling. I have got good results that way. Since the entire ceiling is lit there isn't a concentrated bright spot so there is minimal irritation to the baby's eyes.
 

vector1

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Feb 3, 2007
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#14
Acutally... temp of light can be measured in kelvin also... just add 273 to your deg celsius :D

(all sorts of useless stuff from chem...)
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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hmm, so my temperature is 37.0 add 273, then 310k? so every human got the same color? :think:
erm, the kelvins in measuring colour of light and kelvins in thermodynamic temp are refering to different things..
 

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