Fry the blehdy Pan and make a great shot!


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Aug 19, 2003
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#1
hi panning experts....

i always do my panning using shutter priority at 1/15 with +0.5 setting on 400 film... but i can't seem to get sharp subjects even though i've gone through the panning tutorial on clubsnap and read up on it from other books. is there some secret? am i doing it wrong? what's the ideal setting? i'm pulling my hair out already man... sheeet...

here's a sample.






thanks for your generous advice :)
 

Aug 19, 2003
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#4
here's my set up:

EOS33, tamron 24-135 (that 50th anniversary model).

i will do a few dry runs to see if my spot metering will follow the subject.
then i do a real take and follow the subject from start of movement, snap at perpendicular distance to me, then folllow through.
i've tried both "one shot" and "AI" modes for single shots. have not tried continuous. both the same results.

did not try flash.

tried for 1/15 till 1/30.

was afraid 1/60 or more might not give enough background blur.

so how? verdict? more tips?
 

clive

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Oct 9, 2002
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#5
JermsDayOut said:
i've tried both "one shot" and "AI" modes for single shots. have not tried continuous. both the same results.
no wonder...

u should use "continuous AF" mode.
 

Aug 19, 2003
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#7
2nd shot is perpendicular. 1st shot not so. thanks for pointing that out.

i set my focusing point to be the left most one on my 7-point grid cos i dun want a central weighted composition. so thus the picture.

question... for your successful pans.. out of how many tries would you get one sharp subject?
 

chriszzz

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Jan 17, 2003
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JermsDayOut said:
blohdy hellll.... sure? hmm ok i'll do that the next shoot. damnit. frustrated sial. thanks clive. :)
Not really necessary unless the subject is travelling towards you or away from you (which wouldn't make a good panning subject), or unless your DOF is shallow ( which is unlikely since the subject is at usually least a few meters away and your aperture isn't tat big )

Since the subject is travelling perpendicular to you, AF tracking isn't an issue. In the olden days, people shoot panning shots with manual focus cameras with no problems. Just prefocus, and let the subject move into view. Follow the subject and release the shutter smoothly and follow through. Estimate what is the minimum shutter speed to get a sharp photo, then increase that by 1 or 2 stops. Eg, if you can get a good sharp photo at 1/125, then try shooting at 1/60 or 1/30, depending on how much "blur" you want, and how steady your hands are. Works for me.

The hardest part is following through with the viewfinder blacked out ( due to the mirror flipping up ) on a DSLR/SLR. If your camera is not a DSLR/SLR, then it should be easier to follow through.

From your shots, it would seem either the shutter speed is too long for you to hold steadily, or you are not tracking the subject accurately enough ( ie, the speed you pan is not the same as the speed of your subjects ). Its easier if you practice on subjects that are easier to predict, moves at constant speeds, and give ample time to prepare yourself, such as cars.
 

clive

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#9
if continuous AF tracking cant keep up with the subject..then u will have to use the pre-focus method.

one more thing is : your pan must "stay at the same horizontal level". otherwise any minor shifting up/down/left/right of the camera body will give u the similar effect of camera shake.
 

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