Food wastage


UncleFai

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2010
4,448
36
48
Singapore
#1
Yesterday someone narrated this to us: A well meaning bread making company here decided to donate all their near expiry bread to old folks homes. They even paid for transport to bring it to their door steps. Alas , they got scolded by many that they are trying to "dump" their unwanted goods on the old folks. When that got viral, the CEO got very angry and stopped the whole thing. So now they dump their bread into the dustbin.

We then checked with a relative who is a kitchen executive with an old folks home. He told us their side of the story. The bread usually arrive late in the day with expiry the next day. They don't serve bread after certain time. Plus they do not have the proper facility to store them. End up some of the bread did not last. Some really spoilt, others just no longer taste nice. Afraid it will contaminate the whole batch, they ended up throwing it away.

Either way, bread end up in the rubbish bin.

So while there is sufficient food waste to feed lots of hungry, there are lots of issues on the ground to prevent proper redistribution.
 

diver-hloc

Moderator
Staff member
Apr 17, 2007
5,213
13
38
Somewhere North
#2
[video=youtube;i8xwLWb0lLY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8xwLWb0lLY[/video]
 

donut88

Senior Member
Nov 14, 2008
2,182
5
0
#3
Try explaining to capitalists about food wastage

I think people should just shut up about companies giving food away. Batch of busybodies.

Yes, if I'm the CEO, I will do the same thing. Throw away than to give away.

It's up to NEA and AVA to tell whether the food is fit to consume or not, not the public.
 

#4
Yesterday someone narrated this to us: A well meaning bread making company here decided to donate all their near expiry bread to old folks homes. They even paid for transport to bring it to their door steps. Alas , they got scolded by many that they are trying to "dump" their unwanted goods on the old folks. When that got viral, the CEO got very angry and stopped the whole thing. So now they dump their bread into the dustbin.

We then checked with a relative who is a kitchen executive with an old folks home. He told us their side of the story. The bread usually arrive late in the day with expiry the next day. They don't serve bread after certain time. Plus they do not have the proper facility to store them. End up some of the bread did not last. Some really spoilt, others just no longer taste nice. Afraid it will contaminate the whole batch, they ended up throwing it away.

Either way, bread end up in the rubbish bin.

So while there is sufficient food waste to feed lots of hungry, there are lots of issues on the ground to prevent proper redistribution.
Donate the waste to pig farms in Bukit Timah as animal feeds if they are fit for human consumption.
 

BBTM

Senior Member
Nov 23, 2004
2,211
6
38
BB West
#8
I don't like to eat what can be eaten that left by people who can't finish them. Then why in the first place order so much! If you are sincerely offering other food, ask before you buy it, not after you feels that I don't need, you want attitude. I always finish my portion even I order a lot. Got once, Idk that dish got rice beneath it. Ended I ate all but vomit in the end. Anyway, it's my suffering, I don't waste it but no choice. :(
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#9
I have an opportunity talk to a someone who run a halfway home, they receive food donations from manufactures or distributors, but some time the amount they received is too much for them to consume, they cannot sell it or give it away as this is really meant for them, so they have to dispose it once the food expired.

I don't think there is a simple way to solve this.

on the other hand, we are in a consumerism economy, we buy, use, own and consume more than what we really need, just look at whatever things around you, do you really need all these?
so don't talk too loud and pointing fingers around,

Yes, you can change the world, but it has to start from you.
 

UncleFai

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2010
4,448
36
48
Singapore
#10
The situation in America according to John Oliver... Educational...

[youtube]i8xwLWb0lLY[/youtube]
 

Limsgp

New Member
Dec 16, 2005
1,128
0
0
Singapore, Bedok
#13
Just sell at 90% discount 1hr before closing. No wastage, those who wants will get it. Simple.
 

donut88

Senior Member
Nov 14, 2008
2,182
5
0
#15
I really don't think there is anything wrong abt giving food to those in need.

From perspectives of food wastage, its better than just throw 100% of excess food away. By giving away to old folks, halfway houses, orphanages, the final throw away food will be maybe 50%, after the consumption before expiry date.

From humane perspectives, it offers these people access to better food quality compared to what they have to eat from the institution they are staying in.

From operation costs perspectives, its helping the institutions to save food money and cooking.

If the entire food amount cannot be consume before expiry, so be it. Eat what they can, and throw the rest. The food is already on the way to the trash anyway. It's way better than just throwing 100% away
 

Bukitimah

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2010
1,268
6
38
Singapore
#16
It is a pity that food are being thrown away daily while others don't have enough to eat. Wouldm't it be better if they try to reduce production and sell balance at a discount after certain hours to clear them?

I do understand the company is trying to avoid a situation where everybody wait fo the discount and don't buy their food. I have no solution but don't like to see wastage.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#17
It is a pity that food are being thrown away daily while others don't have enough to eat. Wouldm't it be better if they try to reduce production and sell balance at a discount after certain hours to clear them?

I do understand the company is trying to avoid a situation where everybody wait fo the discount and don't buy their food. I have no solution but don't like to see wastage.
I believe this is because we are encouraging them, we are the one wasting the food, we are the one throwing away the money, if we reduce our wants, the market will correct itself, the simple supply and demand law.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,492
26
48
Pasir Ris
#18
It's up to NEA and AVA to tell whether the food is fit to consume or not, not the public.
Wrong.
The expiry date is an date stating that by this day it is safe to consume the food. This date is usually set extremely conservative by the vendor based on the probability of food being spoiled even if storage and handling is not always optimal etc. A risk calculation, nothing else.
But the date does not say that the food cannot be consumed after that day. The assumption it would be spoiled by next day is just wrong. With proper handling and storing the bread can still be consumed the next days. And here I guess is the problem: if the receiving homes cannot store the amount properly then it becomes a risk of spoiling. If the homes do not store food then whatever gets delivered must be consumed straight away.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,492
26
48
Pasir Ris
#19
It is a pity that food are being thrown away daily while others don't have enough to eat. Wouldm't it be better if they try to reduce production and sell balance at a discount after certain hours to clear them?
Good idea. I saw this already at a bakery shop in Suntec City: after 7pm everything 50% off. And the trays are empty very soon after that time. The same I noticed in Germany with many food shops in train stations. During the last hour of opening everything cooked is 50% off. Not only the food wastage is zero, the company also saves in costs for trash collection.
 

UncleFai

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2010
4,448
36
48
Singapore
#20
Wrong.
The expiry date is an date stating that by this day it is safe to consume the food. This date is usually set extremely conservative by the vendor based on the probability of food being spoiled even if storage and handling is not always optimal etc. A risk calculation, nothing else.
But the date does not say that the food cannot be consumed after that day. The assumption it would be spoiled by next day is just wrong. With proper handling and storing the bread can still be consumed the next days. And here I guess is the problem: if the receiving homes cannot store the amount properly then it becomes a risk of spoiling. If the homes do not store food then whatever gets delivered must be consumed straight away.
Exsactly. It is just an approximation... but my relative did tell us that they get donations in waves. And when it comes, they may not have the right facilities to store all of it. And Singapore's weather is not helping either.
 

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