Food Photography


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cameramad

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Jul 21, 2006
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#1
Hi guys,

Just wanting to play around with taking shots of Food. Helping a friend out with his stall.

Any advise on how to go about doing it?

I have the following:

1. 40D with 100mm Macro and 17-55mm lens
2. EXII580 Flash (if required)
3. Hood for taking macro photos
4. Tripod

Was thinking of putting food in the 'hood' but I fear that the steam from the food might 'cloud' the picture.

Advice please.

Thanks.
 

#2
I'm no expert but I think to take good food shots, lighting is important.

You can try using a ring flash or DIY a ring flash. Get as close as possible to the food until can see the oil :)

The food itself also have to look interesting, garnish it with a little red cut chilli or green pepper to make it look nicer.

You can put it in the hood too, don't worry about the steam, you can always take the picture when the food is cooler.
 

cameramad

New Member
Jul 21, 2006
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#3
I'm no expert but I think to take good food shots, lighting is important.

You can try using a ring flash or DIY a ring flash. Get as close as possible to the food until can see the oil :)

The food itself also have to look interesting, garnish it with a little red cut chilli or green pepper to make it look nicer.

You can put it in the hood too, don't worry about the steam, you can always take the picture when the food is cooler.
Thanks. The steam makes it look hot ma.... but I'm also worried about the hood. Use to do food once, the smell will remain there....

How much does the ring flash cost? I presume can get it at the usual suspect shops?
 

Zoobiee

New Member
Jul 30, 2007
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East of SG
onzoob.com
#4
Hey try get your hands on this book.

http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Food-Photography-Lou-Manna/dp/1592008208

Its amazing! Teaches u all the tricks like making food look good.

e.g.: Using white glue for milk when shooting cereal instead of using real milk.
or using soap suds for beer froth instead of ..well real beer froth..using hot iron for placing well placed marks on steak, the colours which attract the human eye...i'm not a foodie but i really enjoyed the book nonetheless.

Z
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
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#5
Other than the lighting and camera technicalities, look at those food magazines and cook books and see how they make the food seem so much more tasty and presentable.

Food presentation is a big part of food photography, like how shld the grill marks of a steak be arranged, the cutlery, ... There are professional food stylist who guide food photogs. :bsmilie:

Maybe the foodies here can advise as well

Ryan
 

Dream Merchant

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Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#6
Food Photography, Food Styling and Set Styling/Art Direction are separate and specialised disciplines. Sometimes an experienced photographer with a good sense of style/balance also helps do the set styling when there's no budget. I know of some photographers who can also do simple food styling quite well, as well as some stylists who shoot but it's extremely taxing because very often, you have only a few seconds or a few minutes to style, and adjust and get the shot, all at the same time.

Don't try to do everything at once - usually the results are confused, or focus and quality is severely compromised.

If you're really interested in taking good food photos, start with basic still-life practise using just an apple or tomato and find the best ways to light it, or if you're shooting with natural light, the best time of the day and quality/direction of light. Keep it as simple as possible and focus on shape, texture and form.

Google 'How to photograph Food' and lots of info will turn up.

No offense, but it's generally bad idea to go straight into a menu or display food shoot if you've never done it before.
 

cameramad

New Member
Jul 21, 2006
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#8
Hey guys,

Thank you for all the tips. Will check them out and hopefully, have some results for all to see.

Thanks once again....

Saw another thread about the type of lens, understand the 100mm macro is quite good for it... comments?
 

#9
Hey guys,

Thank you for all the tips. Will check them out and hopefully, have some results for all to see.

Thanks once again....

Saw another thread about the type of lens, understand the 100mm macro is quite good for it... comments?
I can instantly tell you that 100mm is over killing! A 60mm macro lens would be nice especially on a crop sensor camera. A strobe is a must sometimes in dim condition. I think you are pretty ready.
 

Dream Merchant

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#10
I can instantly tell you that 100mm is over killing! A 60mm macro lens would be nice especially on a crop sensor camera. A strobe is a must sometimes in dim condition. I think you are pretty ready.
I'm curious ... how so, or what conditions compels such a sweeping statement?
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
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East
#11
I'm curious ... how so, or what conditions compels such a sweeping statement?
I guess the fact that in order to frame the picture nicely, a 100mm would probably force you off a long distance.

I would also suggest that you start with a 50 or 60mm as it would still allow for decent framing of dishes at about 50 to 60cm....
 

Dream Merchant

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
9,660
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#12
True, you'll need a slightly longer working distance for a 100mm as compared to a 50 or 60mm, but the longer lenses offer much more pleasing and natural perspectives, as well as the option to throw more of the BG OOF.

I guess it all depends on the shooting conditions, and what needs to be achieved under those conditions.

Since the TS hinted at commercial food photography ...

http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=383077&page=2
 

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