focusing


GFONG

Member
Oct 9, 2009
217
0
16
Dear Rangefinder users,

I would like to know how are you going to focus under the following situations:

1. Night time;

2. Low Light;

3. Low contrast; and

4. Far subject, such as scenery.

Thanks in advance.
 

gommy

Senior Member
Sep 7, 2006
2,588
2
38
Moses' Hill
Dear Rangefinder users,

I would like to know how are you going to focus under the following situations:

1. Night time;

2. Low Light;

3. Low contrast; and

4. Far subject, such as scenery.

Thanks in advance.
No issues with first 3.
For No. 4 stop down & set to ∞, unless you have fore ground interest, then hyperfocal distance technique.
 

Yoricko

Senior Member
May 25, 2008
1,103
1
38
Singapore
You should mention pattern/grids/foilage.

Anyways, usually I have no problems, but if the contrast is really out of the moon, I'll find something about the same distance that is more contrasty and focus on that object then re-compose. If all else fails, guesstimate distance.
 

paisatge

New Member
Jun 9, 2006
582
0
0
Barcelona, Spain
Usually there's no problem under the mentioned conditions. If you find it difficult to align the image in the rectangular pad, try rotating the camera body a bit - left or right. This may help to get something that is easier to see while keeping the focus distance the same. If that doesn't help, look for something that's about the same distance. Do the focus and recompose. You might also want to use a magnifier - I always have a 1.4x magnifier when using a 50mm lens.

For far away subject, this is easy. You can almost never go wrong using zone or hyperfocal focus even wide open.
 

chiif

Senior Member
Before you look through the viewfinder, look at the focusing scale. Estimate the distance and set it on the lens first. Then bring the viewfinder to your eye and find a large enough object or straight line on the same plane to be your subject of focus, then recompose. Since it's going to be very dark, you probably have to shoot at 1/30 or 1/15 or below. Got to compromise on sharpness.

Hope that helps.
 

theRenaissance

New Member
Jul 9, 2009
849
1
0
Singapore
hey just venture into RF photography with a GSN, have a few issues i hope the experienced bros out here can clarify with me.

1) Lets say I focus on a particular object but I want to place it on the side of the frame. So meaning I can just focus on it then shift to recompose? OR I have to focus on another object along the same distance as it?

2) the GSN only has a max ASA rating of 1000. Can I insert a faster film on it? E.g. Neopan 1600. Would it still work?

3) if at f1.7 and the metering still shows its underexpose, can I up my asa dial to 800 if I have a Tri-X 400 loaded? Will it compensate?

Hope to hear from you guys! and I must say shooting with a RF is really quite different from a SLR/DSLR. But I have to say its growing on me, poison poison...
 

theRenaissance

New Member
Jul 9, 2009
849
1
0
Singapore
hey just venture into RF photography with a GSN, have a few issues i hope the experienced bros out here can clarify with me.

1) Lets say I focus on a particular object but I want to place it on the side of the frame. So meaning I can just focus on it then shift to recompose? OR I have to focus on another object along the same distance as it?

2) the GSN only has a max ASA rating of 1000. Can I insert a faster film on it? E.g. Neopan 1600. Would it still work?

3) if at f1.7 and the metering still shows its underexpose, can I up my asa dial to 800 if I have a Tri-X 400 loaded? Will it compensate?

Hope to hear from you guys! and I must say shooting with a RF is really quite different from a SLR/DSLR. But I have to say its growing on me, poison poison...
anyone can help?
 

baboonish

Member
Jun 15, 2008
398
0
16
Clementi
hey just venture into RF photography with a GSN, have a few issues i hope the experienced bros out here can clarify with me.

1) Lets say I focus on a particular object but I want to place it on the side of the frame. So meaning I can just focus on it then shift to recompose? OR I have to focus on another object along the same distance as it?

2) the GSN only has a max ASA rating of 1000. Can I insert a faster film on it? E.g. Neopan 1600. Would it still work?

3) if at f1.7 and the metering still shows its underexpose, can I up my asa dial to 800 if I have a Tri-X 400 loaded? Will it compensate?

Hope to hear from you guys! and I must say shooting with a RF is really quite different from a SLR/DSLR. But I have to say its growing on me, poison poison...
1) Yes you can focus on it and recompose.

2) I don't think so..

3) Provided you do it for the whole roll.. if you had some images exposed at 400 and 800 on the same roll it would be bizarre(not ideal)

Hope this help :D

Cheers!
 

dankwan

New Member
Feb 22, 2009
1,797
0
0
www.flickriver.com
hey just venture into RF photography with a GSN, have a few issues i hope the experienced bros out here can clarify with me.

1) Lets say I focus on a particular object but I want to place it on the side of the frame. So meaning I can just focus on it then shift to recompose? OR I have to focus on another object along the same distance as it?

2) the GSN only has a max ASA rating of 1000. Can I insert a faster film on it? E.g. Neopan 1600. Would it still work?

3) if at f1.7 and the metering still shows its underexpose, can I up my asa dial to 800 if I have a Tri-X 400 loaded? Will it compensate?

Hope to hear from you guys! and I must say shooting with a RF is really quite different from a SLR/DSLR. But I have to say its growing on me, poison poison...
OK here goes, different strokes for different folks, other more experienced shooters may have a different methodology, this is how I, hobbyist, does it:

1. normally I meter, focus then recompose, if the shift off center isnt too severe, I snap, trusting that the DOF of the aperture selected will cover it shift. If its severe, after composing, I shift back to check focus and revert back to the re-composition. Its tough sometimes to find an object that is at a similar distance particularly if I want to isolate wide open. If its f2 and up, I dont worry about it too much.

2. Yes you can, just shoot normally and tell the lab that you shot 1600 film at 1000. They will then pull process. It turns out grainier however it works well with B/W film, I wouldnt do it for color (like natura 1600) unless you want off-colors. As you get more into film, try shooting 1600asa film at asa 1000 and dont tell lab, just have them process normally, you will be pleasantly surprised by the results. Wont explain yet, try it. Its quite fun.

3. Never re-rate your film mid-roll, if its at f1.7 and the meter tells you under...slow speed down or use a tripod. If you re-rate film mid roll, all your other shots will be affected. Remember this is not digital where they process 1 shot at a time. The lab will process all the shots at the rated speed of the film and cannot just process one or two shots at the re-rated speed. Physically impossible.

OK hope that makes sense, sorry for late-ish response, I saw the thread and wanted to help but got caught up with all the 0.95,1.0,1.1 lens madness (poison) in the other threads. If you have any more questions, just pm me if you like :D

Dan
 

Last edited:

baboonish

Member
Jun 15, 2008
398
0
16
Clementi
OK here goes, different strokes for different folks, other more experienced shooters may have a different methodology, this is how I, hobbyist, does it:

1. normally I meter, focus then recompose, if the shift off center isnt too severe, I snap, trusting that the DOF of the aperture selected will cover it shift. If its severe, after composing, I shift back to check focus and revert back to the re-composition. Its tough sometimes to find an object that is at a similar distance particularly if I want to isolate wide open. If its f2 and up, I dont worry about it too much.

2. Yes you can, just shoot normally and tell the lab that you shot 1600 film at 1000. They will then push process. It turns out grainier however it works well with B/W film, I wouldnt do it for color (like natura 1600) unless you want off-colors. As you get more into film, try shooting 1600asa film at asa 1000 and dont tell lab, just have them process normally, you will be pleasantly surprised by the results. Wont explain yet, try it. Its quite fun.

3. Never re-rate your film mid-roll, if its at f1.7 and the meter tells you under...slow speed down or use a tripod. If you re-rate film mid roll, all your other shots will be affected. Remember this is not digital where they process 1 shot at a time. The lab will process all the shots at the rated speed of the film and cannot just process one or two shots at the re-rated speed. Physically impossible.

OK hope that makes sense, sorry for late-ish response, I saw the thread and wanted to help but got caught up with all the 0.95,1.0,1.1 lens madness (poison) in the other threads. If you have any more questions, just pm me if you like :D

Dan
Yes, Dan is right for #2:sweat:
 

baboonish

Member
Jun 15, 2008
398
0
16
Clementi
some errors corrected in red sorry
No I mean, you had provided a more detailed and accurate answer than my "i don't know" as above. I didn't know you can use iso 1600 with readings of 1000. Sorry sorry
 

theRenaissance

New Member
Jul 9, 2009
849
1
0
Singapore
1) Yes you can focus on it and recompose.

2) I don't think so..

3) Provided you do it for the whole roll.. if you had some images exposed at 400 and 800 on the same roll it would be bizarre(not ideal)

Hope this help :D

Cheers!


OK here goes, different strokes for different folks, other more experienced shooters may have a different methodology, this is how I, hobbyist, does it:

1. normally I meter, focus then recompose, if the shift off center isnt too severe, I snap, trusting that the DOF of the aperture selected will cover it shift. If its severe, after composing, I shift back to check focus and revert back to the re-composition. Its tough sometimes to find an object that is at a similar distance particularly if I want to isolate wide open. If its f2 and up, I dont worry about it too much.

2. Yes you can, just shoot normally and tell the lab that you shot 1600 film at 1000. They will then pull process. It turns out grainier however it works well with B/W film, I wouldnt do it for color (like natura 1600) unless you want off-colors. As you get more into film, try shooting 1600asa film at asa 1000 and dont tell lab, just have them process normally, you will be pleasantly surprised by the results. Wont explain yet, try it. Its quite fun.

3. Never re-rate your film mid-roll, if its at f1.7 and the meter tells you under...slow speed down or use a tripod. If you re-rate film mid roll, all your other shots will be affected. Remember this is not digital where they process 1 shot at a time. The lab will process all the shots at the rated speed of the film and cannot just process one or two shots at the re-rated speed. Physically impossible.

OK hope that makes sense, sorry for late-ish response, I saw the thread and wanted to help but got caught up with all the 0.95,1.0,1.1 lens madness (poison) in the other threads. If you have any more questions, just pm me if you like :D

Dan
Hey! Thanks for the tips, really appreciate it! :thumbsup: Cool next time maybe I can try to shoot asa1600 at 1000 and see what pleasant results will I get! As for point 3, guessed Im screwed because I re-rated my roll afew times but mostly in the last 3 shots. Sure will PM you if I have anymore RF-related questions. Maybe next time if got chance can tag along with you guys and shoot along!
 

dankwan

New Member
Feb 22, 2009
1,797
0
0
www.flickriver.com
Hey! Thanks for the tips, really appreciate it! :thumbsup: Cool next time maybe I can try to shoot asa1600 at 1000 and see what pleasant results will I get! As for point 3, guessed Im screwed because I re-rated my roll afew times but mostly in the last 3 shots. Sure will PM you if I have anymore RF-related questions. Maybe next time if got chance can tag along with you guys and shoot along!
sunday bro, at joo chiat, you'll learn a lot from them pros....I may go for the free food....:bsmilie:
 

theRenaissance

New Member
Jul 9, 2009
849
1
0
Singapore
By the way, try shooting 1600asa film at asa 1000 and dont tell lab, just have them process normally, you will be pleasantly surprised by the results. Wont explain yet, try it. Its quite fun. <--- does it work for both colours and b/w?

and any suggestions for labs processing in central or west?
 

dankwan

New Member
Feb 22, 2009
1,797
0
0
www.flickriver.com
By the way, try shooting 1600asa film at asa 1000 and dont tell lab, just have them process normally, you will be pleasantly surprised by the results. Wont explain yet, try it. Its quite fun. <--- does it work for both colours and b/w?

and any suggestions for labs processing in central or west?
works better with b/w, I dont recommend with color negative film, though Ive done it, the colors were a bit off...unless you like a funky result. You can push/pull color slide film, how far depends on the specs of the film

from what I know asa 1600 film's actual rating is 640 or 800. they somehow magically compensate for it in processing....from what i know that is, I'm not completely sure