Flims


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J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#2
depends on what type you wanna buy..

your typical Kodak and Fujifilm consumer type films can be easily found at just about any photo lab, about $3-$4 for a roll.. typically developing $3-$5 depending on which lab to send it to.. if you wanna scan the negs in, $$.. print, $$..

the more expensive part comes when you go into slide films..
 

Sep 19, 2006
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#3
hi, im thinking of venturing into flim photography

where do i get flim's nowadays and are they expensive to buy and develope?
Check out Foto Hub and CP. Positive costs less than $10 each and E6 development without mounting is about $8. Juz as u r thinking to go film, i m thinking to go digital.
 

Feb 28, 2006
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#4
Check out Foto Hub and CP. Positive costs less than $10 each and E6 development without mounting is about $8. Juz as u r thinking to go film, i m thinking to go digital.
Ruby is another good place for slides film. especially when cp is always out of stock. price is slightly higher though. alternatively, get a few more interested parties and ship from US (ebay).
 

20Babies

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Aug 8, 2007
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What is the difference in Consumer type film and slide silm?

I read somewhere that slide film needs to be refrigerated. But the output is actually what u capture on site. Consumer film has a longer shelf life and the quality output is not as good as film. Is that true?

Also for those who are not going for prints, but want to digitise the pics, they would go for Slide film becos it is cheaper. true?

:confused:
 

Raied

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Jun 13, 2007
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www.krasnajaphoto.com
#7
Welcome to Film Photography, Raied! :)
haven enter yet :p

im still looking up the costs of venturing in this arena, as im still a student so have to see the costs of developing and scanning and the film's itself

hopefully itll be a worthy investment and a good learning experience
 

Feb 28, 2006
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#8
slide has narrower latitude, so you need more precise control of the exposure. however, the color is more vibrant as compare to negative film and since it is a "positive", what you see is what you get. there are some negative film that gives vibrant color, such as reala that waileong is selling now in b&s.

once you started shooting slides, you won't want to look back, at least for me. i scan all negative/positive on my own so the digitization cost is the same. factor in the higher price of slide, shooting slide is slightly more expensive than negative.
 

Feb 28, 2006
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#9
haven enter yet :p

im still looking up the costs of venturing in this arena, as im still a student so have to see the costs of developing and scanning and the film's itself

hopefully itll be a worthy investment and a good learning experience
If you are printing the photos from slide, try to print from digital file rather from the slide itself. it will be much cheaper. meaning u digitized the slide first, then send the files for printing.
 

J-Chan

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2005
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#10
haven enter yet :p

im still looking up the costs of venturing in this arena, as im still a student so have to see the costs of developing and scanning and the film's itself

hopefully itll be a worthy investment and a good learning experience
some shops charge quite a high sum for scanning.. if you plan to shoot and digitise alot of film, then its wiser to get a scanner and scan it in for yourself..
 

20Babies

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Aug 8, 2007
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#11
what scanner to u recommend? How do you scan negatives and positives?
 

Jem777

New Member
Oct 5, 2007
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#12
Films and processing, Ruby. That's where I go anyway. Just got me some Provia and Tmax, film is making me go broke.
 

Mezzotint

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Dec 27, 2004
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Balestier area
martinliew.zenfolio.com
#14
haven enter yet :p

im still looking up the costs of venturing in this arena, as im still a student so have to see the costs of developing and scanning and the film's itself

hopefully itll be a worthy investment and a good learning experience
You might wanna start with Lomography first. Check out the local LOMO forum here. for more details. Or www.lomography.com

Good luck!
 

Jem777

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Oct 5, 2007
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#15
Any places in the east that processes BnW films? I could do it at my friend's school, but I don't want to keep stealing the chemicals.
 

Raied

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Jun 13, 2007
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Clementi
www.krasnajaphoto.com
#16
some shops charge quite a high sum for scanning.. if you plan to shoot and digitise alot of film, then its wiser to get a scanner and scan it in for yourself..
ugh thats a big big turnoff or me

as i said im still a student so my spending power is not there yet

how expensive exactly do they charge for development and scanning of a roll?
 

Sep 26, 2007
761
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sg
#17
ugh thats a big big turnoff or me

as i said im still a student so my spending power is not there yet

how expensive exactly do they charge for development and scanning of a roll?
So sad that this thread suddenly died.
i want to know the answer too.
UP!! ;)
 

#18
ok... let me revive this thread...

I am a film enthusiast... no amount of digital can change that. :)

If you are a student or someone with tight budget, and would like to venture into film, I would suggest that you start off with consumer grade film. Like the Fuji Superia 400 or 200. The cheapest place I have found for these 2 types of film is in Pasir Ris, White Sands basement, a photoshop next to the NTUC. 3 x Superia 400 cost $10. Works out to be $3.30 per roll.

After shooting 36 frames, you can send the roll to the same place for processing at $4 per roll. After which, I would suggest that you borrow or find someone who have a negative scanner to scan your pictures at 4800 dpi into soft copy. At 4800 dpi on a 35mm film will produce about 14MP of file size. You can do a more correction on file of that resolution.

If you have more savings, you can invest in a Canoscan 4400F, which cost about $185 in SimLim Square. If you can stretch to $305 you can get a Canoscan8800F, which in my opinion, it's a very very good scanner for consumers.

Once you are comfortable with shooting with negatives, then you can try B&W. You can invest $100 in getting the equipment for processing film. Get all the gears from Ruby and you can get some free pointers from Mr Ho, who will guide you on how to process B&W negatives. If you still need help to process your own B&W film, Google is your next best friend.

To be honest, film is not as expensive as chasing digital megapixel. With $250, you can get a very good condition 20 year old SLR camera (with a good lens) with a good working meter and produce better results than someone who uses the top of the range full frame 1Ds. At the end, it's the skill and how well you know your own camera that matters.

If you have any doubts, just ask the friendly guys over the counter at Ruby. They will gladly help you if you buy a roll of Illford from them... :)
 

photobum

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Apr 17, 2005
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#19
To be honest, film is not as expensive as chasing digital megapixel. With $250, you can get a very good condition 20 year old SLR camera (with a good lens) with a good working meter and produce better results than someone who uses the top of the range full frame 1Ds. At the end, it's the skill and how well you know your own camera that matters.
True! Going back to film is like paying a visit to an old friend whom you have not seen for years.

The last 2 months I was testing out some China-made Lucky black-and-white 35mm films. Although not as good as my all-time favorite B&W film, the Kodak TMX, the feeling of able to shoot film again is priceless.

All you need is a changing bag, a developing tank, D-76 (or something similar), fixer, hypoclear and photoflo (or something similar). Just hang dry your negatives in a dust-free room (toilet is the best).
 

#20
True! Going back to film is like paying a visit to an old friend whom you have not seen for years.

The last 2 months I was testing out some China-made Lucky black-and-white 35mm films. Although not as good as my favorite B&W film, Kodak TMX, the feeling of able to shoot film again is priceless.

All you need is a changing bag, a developing tank, D-76 (or something similar), fixer, hypoclear and photoflo (or something similar). Just hang dry your negatives in a dust-free room (toilet is the best).
Hmmmmm... Lucky SHD... my favourite... at S$1.70 per roll, it's the perfect film for testing! I got my friend to buy for me from Indonesia, which only cost 7500 rupiahs each roll!

Yes, D-76 is neat, at S$10 per bag, and can get ~4 litre of working solution, with 1:1 dilution, I get to develop 24 rolls! That works out to be $0.50 per roll. :)
 

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