• XENNEC Camera Bags GIVE AWAY - SHARE & TAG your Friend to WIN one XENNEC Stylish bags. Visit this thread thread for more information.

Flash when shooting flowers


Status
Not open for further replies.

justni

New Member
Oct 17, 2006
29
0
0
#1
hi all. whilst shooting for the first time at the orchid gardens, i saw a group of photographers with very high end equipment shooting the orchids and all of them had hand held flashes. i tried searching on this but nothing much came up. can anyone of you enlighten me on the benefits of using such flashes when shooting orchids and such and how does a hand held flash compare to one mounted on the hotshoe. thanks
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,901
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#3
This is called off camera flash set up, you can use a TTL cord to connect your camera to the hotshoe flash to do this, or a pc cord if you don't need to work with TTL. Nikon user can use Creative Lighting System also.
This set up can let you light the subject from the side or from the back instead just from the front.
 

justni

New Member
Oct 17, 2006
29
0
0
#4
oh i see.. what exactly is TTL flash then ?
 

justni

New Member
Oct 17, 2006
29
0
0
#6
meter reading taken thru the lens.
hmm ok.. for the fact that all of them used flash while taking the orchids, does it means that a good flash gun is essential for such pictures, or will the built in flash suffice.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,901
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#8
hmm ok.. for the fact that all of them used flash while taking the orchids, does it means that a good flash gun is essential for such pictures, or will the built in flash suffice.
I hardly use the built in flash on my F80, D70, D100, D200, so I can't say built in flash no good.
But I know Ortega can do wonders with his built in flash for his macro subjects.
 

justni

New Member
Oct 17, 2006
29
0
0
#9
well actually my question is whether a flashgun is worth it for the price and how much more flexibility can it give you as compared to a built in flash ..
 

Lmodel

New Member
Jun 19, 2005
1,124
0
0
Jurong Island
#10
A seperate flash offers you alot of angles which you couldn't take with the built in. For built in, flash is always direct. At times, you will need to flash to be from bottom up or from side, depending on the natural light at that point of time. This, is something you can never achieve with your built-in.

Cheers
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
14,002
0
0
Pasir Ris, Singapore
#15
A seperate flash offers you alot of angles which you couldn't take with the built in. For built in, flash is always direct. At times, you will need to flash to be from bottom up or from side, depending on the natural light at that point of time. This, is something you can never achieve with your built-in.

Cheers
Also, built-in ones are not as powerful and are more prone to red-eye effect as the flash is closer to the lens axis.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#17
A seperate flash offers you alot of angles which you couldn't take with the built in. For built in, flash is always direct. At times, you will need to flash to be from bottom up or from side, depending on the natural light at that point of time. This, is something you can never achieve with your built-in.

Cheers
Yup... agrees wholeheartedly... it's fun experimenting with the different angles of light tat you can light up a subject.

Mebbe later tonight, I can dig out some shots of a macro shoot done sometime back where I tried different lighting angles.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom