Flash Photography


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Jul 26, 2002
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Woodlands
#1
Can I have some intructions on using flash?
The do's and the don'ts. I have been avoiding using flash as much as possible as I'm afraid of blowing out the photo but sometimes you just don't have a choice!

So I would want to learn more about it.
 

PentiumPC

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Dec 11, 2002
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#2
Originally posted by Evilmerlin
Can I have some intructions on using flash?
The do's and the don'ts. I have been avoiding using flash as much as possible as I'm afraid of blowing out the photo but sometimes you just don't have a choice!

So I would want to learn more about it.
Beside the regular stuff you read in book, it will be more of a learn by experience thing, the more you use the more comfortable you are with it.

Cheers,
 

e_liau

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Oct 29, 2002
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#3
Originally posted by Evilmerlin
Can I have some intructions on using flash?
The do's and the don'ts. I have been avoiding using flash as much as possible as I'm afraid of blowing out the photo but sometimes you just don't have a choice!

So I would want to learn more about it.
Huh? What do you want to know about flash photography? Prehaps you can give some questions, and we can discuss over it?

Rule No1, don't use direct flash unless necessary. If necessary try to diffuse the flash light.
 

Jul 26, 2002
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Woodlands
#4
Well, I don't have an external flash unit. just those that are built into the camera.

How do you determine the power of the flash? I understand that they go by the same units as aperture (number of stops). How does that work?
 

Aug 6, 2002
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#5
If you are using internal flash, there is not much control you can play with. It is up to your camera to determine how strong the flash is to light up your subject
 

d7t3

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Oct 3, 2002
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#6
Some tips:

1. Try to avoid firing directly at reflective surfaces, e.g. spectacles, people standing in front of windows.

2. If you can, bounce the flash off a plain, light ceiling or wall (watch for light fixtures on the ceiling which can cast reflections).

3. If direct, putting the flash above the camera makes the shadows more natural (downwards).

4. If people are too near a wall, the shadows they cast will be very sharp and possibly distracting or ugly. You could shoot on shutter priority and lower your shutter speed to maybe 30? It will require less flash, and shadows will be less obvious.

5. Know your flash strength (guide no.). Areas beyond flash range will get much darker with distance.

6. Due to the above, if people are too far from the background, they may appear a bit overexposed and the background may go black. You can compensate a little by lowering the shutter speed to 30 perhaps (depending on your lens & situation) and letting the camera balance the flash output. This is one of the more useful tips I learnt. The slower speed lets more background light register.

7. Outdoors, fill flash can be used to minimise shadows. If afraid of overexposure, some cameras can be set to have e.g. -1 flash compensation (different from normal exposure compensation).

I don't like using flash either, but these are the things I find more useful to remember.
 

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