flash PC connector for coolpix


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igpenguin

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Hi,

I read on the web an article on using external flash with coolpix . There's this Wein Safe-Sync HS adaptor. Anybody has any experience with this? Are there any alternatives?

Checked out Nikon USA website and they have their own brand adaptor, but presumably does not regulate voltage.

Thanks!
 

mpenza

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you don't need the expensive safe-sync if you use a flash with a low trigger voltage. Currently, I'm using an external flash which has a trigger voltage of about 4V as measured using a multimeter.
 

ckiang

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Long time ago, Mike Rubin of Nikon USA has openly said that you can use flash units with trigger voltages of up to 250V without damaging the Coolpix series.

But I myself has not tried. The only flashes I've tried on my Coolpix 950 is the SB28 and an old Vivitar 2800D. A regular, non-regulated hotshoe to PC connector should cost about $15 or so.

Regards
CK
 

igpenguin

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Thanks for the replies! Seems pretty risk-free then to use a normal HS to PC connector.

Just acquired strobes running on 240v household current... hence wondering. Not about to exercise Shriro warranty... ;p

Had been using normal SLR/DSLR with studio strobes through on camera PC sync terminal, are those regulated too?
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by igpenguin
Thanks for the replies! Seems pretty risk-free then to use a normal HS to PC connector.

Just acquired strobes running on 240v household current... hence wondering. Not about to exercise Shriro warranty... ;p

Had been using normal SLR/DSLR with studio strobes through on camera PC sync terminal, are those regulated too?
The mechanical SLR ones are much more hardy (they are mechanical contacts), whereas the electronic and DSLR ones are electronic switches - a bit more 'fragile'. So long as the trigger voltage of the flash is below 250V for coolpixes, should be okay. Use a multimeter to measure the voltage between the trigger pin of the flash (the centre pin of the PC terminal) and the ground terminal (the ring around it).

Running on 240V does not mean the trigger voltage is 240V. :)

Regards
CK
 

igpenguin

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Hi ckiang,

Now I know. Much thanks! :)

Just tested with a normal hotshoe-pc adaptor. Coolpix still intact ;p

Then remembered my speedlight has a PC connection and used that. Ditto, works too without hitch.

Erm, supposing there's a sudden power shortage, or somebody does something else to disrupt the power supply. Any chance to fry the eqpt with a trigger voltage that's too high?

Paiseh about my ignorance!
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by igpenguin
Hi ckiang,

Now I know. Much thanks! :)

Just tested with a normal hotshoe-pc adaptor. Coolpix still intact ;p

Then remembered my speedlight has a PC connection and used that. Ditto, works too without hitch.

Erm, supposing there's a sudden power shortage, or somebody does something else to disrupt the power supply. Any chance to fry the eqpt with a trigger voltage that's too high?

Paiseh about my ignorance!
If there is a surge, almost anything can be damaged. :p But if you connect the Coolpix to a studio strobe with a trigger voltage of > 250V, you risk frying its flash circuitry. Or even the whole camera. Worse, the damage might not be instantaneous. So, better double check with a multimeter to be safe.

Alternatively, slave trigger them using this technique:
http://www.digitalsecrets.net/secrets/flash.html


Regards
CK
 

mpenza

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6V batteries could generate voltages in excess of 200V. I've seen it myself with the Achiever 260T. you actually could "hear" the voltage being built-up across the trigger.

You're using Nikon Speedlight flash? Then, there wouldn't be any problem with trigger voltage.

Actually, for "high trigger voltage" flash, any problem won't happen immediately. After the flash gets old and the internal circuits get bad, then something nasty may happen. This is what I learnt when I went searching for info on external flash previously.
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by mpenza
6V batteries could generate voltages in excess of 200V. I've seen it myself with the Achiever 260T. you actually could "hear" the voltage being built-up across the trigger.

You're using Nikon Speedlight flash? Then, there wouldn't be any problem with trigger voltage.

Actually, for "high trigger voltage" flash, any problem won't happen immediately. After the flash gets old and the internal circuits get bad, then something nasty may happen. This is what I learnt when I went searching for info on external flash previously.
Even 3V can generate very high voltages. All flash units have an inverter circuit that steps up the low voltage from batteries etc to the high voltage required to fire the flash tube. The high pitched sound you hear is that of the charging circuitry. Somehow the SB28 can cut off that sound once it's charged.

That's why you should not mess around opening up flash units. You can get a nasty shock. Leslie of John 3:16 got a shock when opening up a disposable camera. :)

Regards
CK
 

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