Flash...metz or pentax 540?


ardnirun

New Member
Sep 22, 2008
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Serangoon
#1
Hi all...
new convert to pentax..and i am getting a flashgun tomorrow..

i have my eyes set on either the Metz 58 or the pentax 540...

i've been reading up the forum and i've read that many pentaxians encountered problems with the pentax...

which flash is really "safer" to buy?
 

felixcat8888

Senior Member
May 8, 2005
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Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#2
Hi all...
new convert to pentax..and i am getting a flashgun tomorrow..

i have my eyes set on either the Metz 58 or the pentax 540...

i've been reading up the forum and i've read that many pentaxians encountered problems with the pentax...

which flash is really "safer" to buy?
Sigma, Pentax and Metz are all safe to buy.
 

sircam

New Member
May 21, 2007
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#4
Out of the three above... feature wise.... the Metz (AF-58) will allow you to do the most.
 

teruranse

New Member
Dec 19, 2006
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#5
Sigma, Pentax and Metz are all safe to buy.
how bout the yong nuo type of flashs? i understand its only manual right? actually i am looking for a backup flash as my pentax 540 seems to be giving me problems...
 

felixcat8888

Senior Member
May 8, 2005
9,279
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Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#6
how bout the yong nuo type of flashs? i understand its only manual right? actually i am looking for a backup flash as my pentax 540 seems to be giving me problems...
No experience with the China made ones as I have had an older Metz for my SLRs and now a Metz 58 for my K20D. The Sigma and the Pentax are also better than the China made one as they have P-TTL.
 

hkway

New Member
Sep 5, 2006
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#7
Hi,

May I know where can I find Metz 58 AF-1 for Pentax in Singapore? and price?

Thank you very much.
 

darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
3,209
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#9
how bout the yong nuo type of flashs? i understand its only manual right? actually i am looking for a backup flash as my pentax 540 seems to be giving me problems...
My backup flash is a Nikon SB26, even more sturdy than Metz 48 and simple to operate in A mode. :thumbsup:
 

teruranse

New Member
Dec 19, 2006
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#12
Yup, no PTTL, spot beam, or any of that fancy stuff, but the flash can be fired. All you need to do is match the ISO and aperture between the camera and flash.
so basically its just acting like those manual flash only more branded and expensive :bsmilie:
 

darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
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#13
so basically its just acting like those manual flash only more branded and expensive :bsmilie:
Not really.. The A (thyristor) mode means that the flash will give you the correct flash exposure, and my experience so far is that it is even more reliable than P-TTL :angry: M mode you have to keep doing trial and error, esp with bounce flash.
 

sircam

New Member
May 21, 2007
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#14
Not really.. The A (thyristor) mode means that the flash will give you the correct flash exposure, and my experience so far is that it is even more reliable than P-TTL :angry: M mode you have to keep doing trial and error, esp with bounce flash.
Yup. I have the same exact opinion too. The Auto Sensor mode in my good ol' Metz and Vivitar units beat the P-TTL in reliability. I notice this not only in comparison to P-TTL but also with I-TTL and E-TTL. That said, both I-TTL and E-TTL have gotten perceptibly better and better over the years. I feel P-TTL has considerable catching up to do as far as flash exposure accuracy is concerned.

I'll also include this for factual correctness for those who are interested:

A 'Thyristor' only deals with cutting off the excess power once correct exposure has been attained. It also enables saving the unused portion of the stored electrical charge for the next shot. This enables both faster recharging time and longer battery life.

A manual flash may have an 'optical sensor' which works in conjunction with a predetermined algorithm for exposure accuracy. After the flash fires, it is the job of this optical sensory component inside the manual flash unit to decide when correct exposure has been attained. It then communicates to the thyristor circuit to immediately cut off and save the unused power for the next shot.

Summary of the above:

Flash Sensor (Optical Component): Determines exposure accuracy.

Flash Thyristor (Electrical Component): Cuts off current supply to flash bulb and stores unused portion for subsequent use.
 

teruranse

New Member
Dec 19, 2006
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#15
so what would be the better choice in getting a backup flash based on the above?
 

darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
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#16
Flash Sensor (Optical Component): Determines exposure accuracy.

Flash Thyristor (Electrical Component): Cuts off current supply to flash bulb and stores unused portion for subsequent use.
You're right. It should be called auto-thyristor flash instead of just thyristor flash.

The Vivitar 285HV is also a sturdy workhorse but that one has no swivel function, just bounce tilt.
 

sircam

New Member
May 21, 2007
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#18
You're right. It should be called auto-thyristor flash instead of just thyristor flash.

The Vivitar 285HV is also a sturdy workhorse but that one has no swivel function, just bounce tilt.
Yup. Vivitar 285HVs are safe for mounting on digital cameras. I use them occasionally when I need extra power... but I do find them quite a bother to mount directly onto a DSLR because they cannot swivel. But they are extremely reliable whenever I use them either as a standalone unit off-camera OR on my customized flash bracket.

That said, nothing beats the sheer build quality, usability and feature-set of the Metz 58-AF. Other camera brands can only aspire rise to the level of the Metz 58-AF. The top of the line Canon and Nikon speedlights do come close though!

After using several DSLRs and advanced compacts over the years across brands, my faithful Metz flashguns always performed as expected.

Useful advice to newbies: If you are interested in using bounce flash, I'd strongly advise investing in nothing lower than a flashlight equivalent in brightness to the Metz 48-AF and 58-AF units. I'd suggest the Metz 58-AF for sheer power and additional features, else the Metz 48-AF which is a close second. Both these flashes will find ready buyers in this forum if you decide to change in the future.

If you can afford it, don't waste your time doing research into the different kinds of flash units and flash brands... just purchase a bright feature-rich Metz flash! Slightly more expensive initially... but cheaper in the long run if you are serious about learning advanced techniques of flash photography.
 

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darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
3,209
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Singapore
#19
If you can afford it, don't waste your time doing research into the different kinds of flash units and flash brands... just purchase a bright feature-rich Metz flash! Slightly more expensive initially... but cheaper in the long run if you are serious about learning advanced techniques of flash photography.
I agree, getting a good flash is very important as it makes flash photography much easier. Even with the Nikon SBs I had some limitations, like cannot do off-camera flash easily, no HSS, limitations on flash exposure (high ISO, wide apertures), no spot beam, etc.
 

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