"Flash bounce" during a snowstorm?


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#1
I've had an idea to go shooting outdoors (with adequate protection of course) once winter arrives and hits Seattle with a snowstorm. Would it be viable to 'bounce' the SB-800 up into the sky against the falling snow, in effect creating a giant diffuser?

There will be quite some light loss of course, and the heavier the snowstorm the better, since there will be more particles to reflect light back. This idea of course is entirely in theory, I have not tried it yet.

Weather protection is definitely paramount but one of those all-weather covers should take care of it. The problem is keeping the snow off your front element. Anyone know any creative methods to do that? Even a huge lens hood doesn't do as even moving around at walking speeds in a snowstorm gets snow sticking to your front element.

Still have a lot of time to think about this.. I mean it's still summer!
 

#2
well, dunno if anyone here can answer your question because almost all of us are in the tropics, but technically it would be possible but would there be anything to shoot with a snowstorm that's thick enough to bounce light?
 

#4
think you'll get "backscatter" from the snow too. the light will bounce off the snow particles between you and your subject, and reflect back into your lens.

try searching online for "backscatter" in u/w photos that have this phenomenon too. i think snow will act the same way as particles in the water.
 

Mar 31, 2007
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#6
Theoretically, it is possible. It also depends on how heavy the snow is and the light rebounce from snow may not be the effect u wan. snowflakes are flat and in all angles. so....
 

CYRN

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Nov 14, 2002
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#7
wait till winter... then test shoot wif bounced flash.

Not mission critical process rite? :think:

No matter wat theories tell you. There's no such thing as can or cannot bounce flash in snowstorm, who knows, the effects might be surprising. ;)
 

V

vince123123

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#8
I don't think this will work at all. Its similar to shooting in a smoky pub, you can't bounce anything because the light will be scattered before it reaches your subject.
 

garou12

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May 15, 2007
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#9
I don't think this will work at all. Its similar to shooting in a smoky pub, you can't bounce anything because the light will be scattered before it reaches your subject.
that and the cold will sap your battery power very quickly. I thought it rarely snowed in Seattle?
 

#10
that and the cold will sap your battery power very quickly. I thought it rarely snowed in Seattle?
Yup we just get snow a few times during winter. But usually 1-2 of those events will be major. People hate it but I love it because school gets canceled which means I have time to go out and make images. Unlike other places which frequently experience snow, I like how it suddenly brings everyday life to a halt.

I pulled these off with a camera phone last winter when the snowstorm just came without any warning. Didn't want to risk a DSLR as I didn't have any weather covers back then.





Not a mission critical process of course :) Just want to make some images with whatever is available to use when the moment happens.
 

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