fisheyes or wa lens


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Koelsch

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Jan 5, 2006
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#2
it's better to do a search yourself but fisheye has almost a 180degrees view and will have distortions like curvy edges at the side. wide angle is just wide but no curves at the side. fisheye is more for creativity shots =)
 

sORe-EyEz

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Jun 28, 2005
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#3
agree, WA lense r more versatile IMO. too many pic w/ fisheye look can b boring / repetative aft some time.

most WA lense got abit of distortion but IMO minimal, not like d exagerated curves of a fisheye.
 

fWord

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Jun 23, 2005
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#5
I think part of the decision would rest on whether you are using a DSLR or a film SLR.

A fisheye on a DSLR with a crop factor will give images with markedly reduced distortions at the sides because of the cropped field of view, but it's still noticeable. The images can subsequently be de-fished to produce distortion-free photos, but doing this drops the quality significantly...according to an online photo test I saw, at least.

Also, if you are using a DSLR that has a crop factor, eg. D70, D50, then the effective field-of-view on your fisheye will be not much more than that of a normal (rectilinear) 15mm lens. Not to mention that with rectilinear lenses, the fisheye sort of distortion will not be present. Images do not need to be defished in software and image quality will be better maintained.

Try to source for a WA lens for your DSLR instead. I've come to a conclusion that the Tokina 12-24mm f/4 is perhaps the best 3rd party WA available...and should be cheaper than a Nikkor 12-24mm...not to mention it's very well-built.

Check the review here for more:

http://photozone.de

Hope I got everything right. I'm not a Nikon user, so there's only so much I can say.

Additionally, the choice of fisheye or WA lens might depend on your intended purposes. If you're out for very creative images and will only use the lens once in a while for selected occasions, then the fisheye is something you can try. However, if you're primarily looking for spanning landscape shots, interior photographs or architecture, go for the WA lens. However, there is another argument that you should go for a perspective control or tilt-shift lens instead of a WA for architectural photography.

When using a WA to shoot tall buildings, the whole structure will appear to taper sharply towards the top, which makes it look very unnatural. And unless you can photograph from a good height in order to prevent this 'converging verticals' phenomenon, you'd be better off shooting with a PC lens, which you can use at ground level. Some people also use PC lenses to squeeze a bit more of whatever depth of field they have. If shifted to the correct angle, a PC lens may allow you to take a photo of a bed of flowers with all of them in sharp focus from foreground to background.

Anyway, I better let the experts do the talking here. :sweatsm:
 

Watcher

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Feb 9, 2003
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#6
There are 2 major types of FE lenses: rectilinear and circular fisheye. For rectilinear, it is not near 180 degrees, it is 180 degrees FOV diagonally. Circular fisheyes have a greater angle of coverage. Please read a little like here before commenting :rolleyes:

The Nikkor 6mm circular FE can cover 220 degrees IIRC.

On the Nikon DSLRs, the 10.5FE covers 180 degrees diagonal, but obviously, not for the 16mm FE.

Techically, the so-call "distortion" is not really a distortion but rather due to OP projection, the opposite of when trying to project the map of the world from the glob to a 2-D map.
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#7
sORe-EyEz said:
agree, WA lense r more versatile IMO. too many pic w/ fisheye look can b boring / repetative aft some time.

most WA lense got abit of distortion but IMO minimal, not like d exagerated curves of a fisheye.
Nikon Capture _is one of the software available which_ can convert (de-fish) a fisheye image into rectilinear.

(just added _is one...which_). Thanks rebbot! :)
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#8
Watcher said:
There are 2 major types of FE lenses: rectilinear and circular fisheye. For rectilinear, it is not near 180 degrees, it is 180 degrees FOV diagonally. Circular fisheyes have a greater angle of coverage. Please read a little like here before commenting :rolleyes:

The Nikkor 6mm circular FE can cover 220 degrees IIRC.

On the Nikon DSLRs, the 10.5FE covers 180 degrees diagonal, but obviously, not for the 16mm FE.

Techically, the so-call "distortion" is not really a distortion but rather due to OP projection, the opposite of when trying to project the map of the world from the glob to a 2-D map.
If it's rectilinear, then it's not fisheye. The fisheye lens which gives a rectangular picture just fits the rectangular imaging area within the image circle while the circular fisheye fits the circle within the imaging area. Fisheye lenses are curvilinear.
 

rebbot

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Mar 24, 2005
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#9
lsisaxon said:
Nikon Capture can convert (de-fish) a fisheye image into rectilinear.
there are many tools to de-fish provided you have the parameters. its maths all in all so nikon capture is not necessary. ;)
 

Watcher

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#10
lsisaxon said:
If it's rectilinear, then it's not fisheye. The fisheye lens which gives a rectangular picture just fits the rectangular imaging area within the image circle while the circular fisheye fits the circle within the imaging area. Fisheye lenses are curvilinear.
My mistake: the terms should be full frame and circular. A special 3rd type is the OP fisheye
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#11
Watcher said:
My mistake: the terms should be full frame and circular. A special 3rd type is the OP fisheye
Hmm.. Haven't come across OP-Fisheye before. Now that you pointed it out, I did a web search and it does look interesting. :) Good to know that such a lens existed.
 

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