fisheye DX 10.5mm f2.8


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Nov 8, 2008
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#1
Hi all,
i just got my fisheye lens from a fellow brother here at the resale forum and enjoying it very much. i would say it is quite fun.

My only concern is that i cannot put a filter on the lens to protect. at pic 1, i was at my viewfinder and almost hit the pillar. Asked around and everyone advised me that a filter is not possible. just use with extra care.

Any friends here using this lens and would like to share your experiences here. Probably some tips and links to a better fisheye shot for this newbie? I am interested in composition for fisheye shots.

went to labrador park
1

2

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all shots came direct from my camera without photoshopping.
thanks
 

Octarine

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Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#3
My only concern is that i cannot put a filter on the lens to protect. at pic 1, i was at my viewfinder and almost hit the pillar. Asked around and everyone advised me that a filter is not possible. just use with extra care.
Take any big filter or just a big ring of plastic, hold around lens lens and look through viewfinder. Try to get any image without the ring or filter rim not appearing in the frame. You'll see for yourself that with such an extreme field of view it is not possible to put anything in front of the lens. That's why certain fisheye lenses (e.g. Zenitar 16mm) have filters at the backend (small screw mount filters covering the rear element of the lens.
Enjoy your fisheye :)
 

geraldkhoo

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Jun 15, 2007
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The Tiny Red Dot
sgstrobist.blogspot.com
#6
The Fisheye lens is a fun lens... but it is also not an easy lens to use because of the distortions. You can register yourself in flickr.com and join groups where pictures of the 10.5mm fisheye lens is used to view how others have used the lens.

Have fun! ;)
 

Jul 22, 2008
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#7
is it true that only full frame SLR can use fisheye lens?
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#10
Hi all,
i just got my fisheye lens from a fellow brother here at the resale forum and enjoying it very much. i would say it is quite fun.

My only concern is that i cannot put a filter on the lens to protect. at pic 1, i was at my viewfinder and almost hit the pillar. Asked around and everyone advised me that a filter is not possible. just use with extra care.

Any friends here using this lens and would like to share your experiences here. Probably some tips and links to a better fisheye shot for this newbie? I am interested in composition for fisheye shots.

went to labrador park
1

2

3

4


all shots came direct from my camera without photoshopping.
thanks
the diagonal angle of view of this lens is already 180 degree, if there is a way to have a protecting filter, probably will cost more than the lens itself.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,488
26
48
Pasir Ris
#11
the diagonal angle of view of this lens is already 180 degree, if there is a way to have a protecting filter, probably will cost more than the lens itself.
And it will look ... like an even bigger fish eye :bigeyes:
 

jeremyW

New Member
Jan 27, 2008
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#12
Hi

I have the Nikon 10.5 DX and its a wonderful lens. Its really fun to use. However, too much of it can be ... overwhelming. I think the trick of using the fish eye is to make sure that it becomes as difficult as possible to see that its a fisheye. For landscapes frame in such a way that the curves of the land looks natural. For portraits, avoid putting people at the sides. For buildings, make it such that the slanted structures look as if its the architects intent, and not the haphazard corruption through a fish eye.

I am no expert, just a keen hobbyist. But I find that my nicer fish-eye shots work this way.

I hope this helped you.

Cheers!
 

Nov 8, 2008
90
0
6
#13
Hi

I have the Nikon 10.5 DX and its a wonderful lens. Its really fun to use. However, too much of it can be ... overwhelming. I think the trick of using the fish eye is to make sure that it becomes as difficult as possible to see that its a fisheye. For landscapes frame in such a way that the curves of the land looks natural. For portraits, avoid putting people at the sides. For buildings, make it such that the slanted structures look as if its the architects intent, and not the haphazard corruption through a fish eye.

I am no expert, just a keen hobbyist. But I find that my nicer fish-eye shots work this way.

I hope this helped you.

Cheers!
Hi jeremyw, thanks for your tips.
I will try that out.

I will use it alongside with my 10-24mm and see the differences at 10mm and the fisheye.
 

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