Finding the right angle to shoot


rebelriot

New Member
Aug 4, 2010
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#1
hi there.

i was traveling around chinatown yesterday, and the day before, around central area. saw many beautiful buildings, temples, structures, sky scrappers and lovely scenery.

so happen that i didnt bring my canon DSLR to shoot, i just use my mobile phone's camera to frame the scenery into it,and snap a few. but somehow i felt that those angles which i shoot from, are quite bad.

i know pictures speaks better than words. but sadly, i deleted those photos before it even hit my mind to post it here, to let you all advise me on.

in anyways, i would love to seek advise from the bros & pros here, on how to position my camera, or place my imaging device, to get a nicer shot?
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
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#2
composition is not that something can just by telling you and you can straigh away produce results, how about joining some newbie outings, Gatherings and Outings and learn from others with your hands on?

this thread has noting related to Canon, thread moved.
 

evilorgi

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2007
1,585
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36
Tampines
www.facebook.com
#3
hi there.

i was traveling around chinatown yesterday, and the day before, around central area. saw many beautiful buildings, temples, structures, sky scrappers and lovely scenery.

so happen that i didnt bring my canon DSLR to shoot, i just use my mobile phone's camera to frame the scenery into it,and snap a few. but somehow i felt that those angles which i shoot from, are quite bad.

i know pictures speaks better than words. but sadly, i deleted those photos before it even hit my mind to post it here, to let you all advise me on.

in anyways, i would love to seek advise from the bros & pros here, on how to position my camera, or place my imaging device, to get a nicer shot?
hmm, you are asking quite a vague question here, and i supposed that many will have some trouble answering you truthfully...

i will suggest that you go through more photos of individuals that has shot the places you have been to, and see from the way they frame their shot and of course, mastering the lighting by noting certain settings.

and photog is quite a subjective issue here, what is nice for me, need not be nice for you. so you will have to find your own 'feel'. 1st determine what do you want to get out of this picture, once you are clear on that you will be easier off framing the photos...

handphone cam and dslr alike, still requires good framing and command of the lighting, doesnt mean that with a dslr = stunning photos... you will be surprised what kind of photos that some can produce with their iphone cam! so go and practise more, shoot more until you find that right feel...
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
69
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lil red dot
#4
Composition is all about having the eye to spot something interesting and present it in a way that tells a story, or emphasizes and bring out what you are trying to focus on in the shot. It is not something that can be taught over an internet forum.

That said, there are still some basic concepts you can start looking at to improve. Here are some links to those concepts.

http://www.amateursnapper.com/photography/10-top-photography-composition-rules
http://digital-photography-school.com/digital-photography-composition-tips
 

daredevil123

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Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
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lil red dot
#5
Even handphone camera are capable of getting good images if you know the strengths and weaknesses are. Here are some I took

Taken with Nokia 6110 Navigator's 2MP camera in low light...



The following taken with Nokia N97 mini



 

Edwin Francis

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2006
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#6
Congratulations rebelriot! There's a ton of good advice already on this thread, but none of it is worth a damn if you aren't willing to look at your own work with a critical eye, and you seem to be doing that instead of blaming your gear ;)
My own contribution would be: what kind of images do you like? Vibrant colours? Exaggerated perspectives? Capturing that 'decisive moment'? Look at other good images and think about what makes them work.
Rather than shooting everything that looks vaguely interesting, set yourself an exercise to look for a particular type of shot. Shoots lots of variations of a shot if you aren't sure what might work. Then go through your photos and see what worked and what didn't, and more importantly, why. Don't be afraid to ask for feedback from others -- not necessarily photographers, but anyone you believe has good taste. Some of the best insights often come from non-photographers. :)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#7
What you are looking for is the "photographer's eye", or that spark of inspiration and creativity. This is not really something that can be taught, but you can start by reading up on the many many many articles and online tutorials about composition.
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
1,494
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upper thomson
#8
go through magazines... see what type of pictures they use... how do they frame a subject, how to they create a scene...

many things around you advertisements etc will show some evidence of composition..

this will open up ur mind to more ideas, creative ways to paint a picture...
 

kenny888

Senior Member
Oct 24, 2003
804
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Visit site
#9
Read some magazines, experiment shooting from different angles. After some time u'll get a better idea : )
 

rebelriot

New Member
Aug 4, 2010
142
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0
#10
Congratulations rebelriot! There's a ton of good advice already on this thread, but none of it is worth a damn if you aren't willing to look at your own work with a critical eye, and you seem to be doing that instead of blaming your gear ;)
My own contribution would be: what kind of images do you like? Vibrant colours? Exaggerated perspectives? Capturing that 'decisive moment'? Look at other good images and think about what makes them work.
Rather than shooting everything that looks vaguely interesting, set yourself an exercise to look for a particular type of shot. Shoots lots of variations of a shot if you aren't sure what might work. Then go through your photos and see what worked and what didn't, and more importantly, why. Don't be afraid to ask for feedback from others -- not necessarily photographers, but anyone you believe has good taste. Some of the best insights often come from non-photographers. :)
bros here, thanks alot. will google some image, checkout magazines, and other people's work and use those ideas.
 

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night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
0
0
www.pbase.com
#11
hi there.

i was traveling around chinatown yesterday, and the day before, around central area. saw many beautiful buildings, temples, structures, sky scrappers and lovely scenery.

so happen that i didnt bring my canon DSLR to shoot, i just use my mobile phone's camera to frame the scenery into it,and snap a few. but somehow i felt that those angles which i shoot from, are quite bad.

i know pictures speaks better than words. but sadly, i deleted those photos before it even hit my mind to post it here, to let you all advise me on.

in anyways, i would love to seek advise from the bros & pros here, on how to position my camera, or place my imaging device, to get a nicer shot?

1) experiment

2) look at good pictures

3) read up on photographic books, read up on compositional theory. have an open mind, and don't be too rigid with the so-called "rules" of photography.

4) move around, most people don't move around... shoot at eye level, shoot at the safest and most convenient spot, this is the reason for most bad compositions.

5) pay attention to every detail, take constant care to ensure that what you don't want to be in is out, that what you want in is in.

6) always think before you take a shot - what is bad about it, what is good about it - is the good enough to overlook the bad, since there is no perfect picture? this is the most important process, this is where you learn the most. try to figure out why your picture might be good, why it might be bad. when you can look at any picture and quickly point out a few problems and merits of it off the top of your head... that is when you know what you are doing. what you want to do. what you will do.

6) think about the light, photographic results are not what you see in real life

7) be your worst judge, demand more from yourself, and never be content with what you get

no one can help you with composition, the best person to help you is yourself. whether you wish to make the effort, or are just happy enough with proclaiming that the composition is sound (as some people in here end up doing).... really depends on one person...

YOU.
 

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daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#12
bet you must have misread my post edwin. i didnt blame on my gear if you read it properly. i blame it on my own framing skills. because of the way i shot my pictures, i felt that it is quite meaningless. i felt that i did not bring out the essence of the item / scene / product that i have shot. :D

for the rest of the bros here, thanks alot. will google some image, checkout magazines, and other people's work and use those ideas.
TS, Edwin is saying you are doing good, that you are indeed looking at your own work and NOT blaming your gear... good la... :thumbsup:
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
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lil red dot
#14
Roger Roger. hahaha
Anyway, the best way to train that creative eye... this is my opinion...


Your eyes see first... so use your eyes to look first. Not through the viewfinder.

Try to notice something that stands out... colors, people, emotions, etc...
Observe people's mannerisms and emotions...
Look for things that create 'tension'.
Look for patterns, textures...
Look at how light casts shadows..

Just keep reminding yourself to observe, even when you do not have a camera with you. Look at things/people/animals/objects/buildings, study them.

Not only will your photography skill improve... but so will your quality of life. ;)
 

ahming111

New Member
Jan 28, 2010
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#15
look @ gd pictures, try to imitate them. from there you'll learn how to position yourself and shoot from where. with this exp, u'll be able to reuse it on other scene.

proper practise makes perfect
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
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upper thomson
#16
be still and blend in with the environment~!!

haha.. and not forgetting the great advice from daredevil
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
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upper thomson
#18
how come sounds like naruto trying to learn the sage mode ar?? :confused:
ooops~! sorry i never watch naruto...

haha, but yes, sometimes we become so obsessed with taking photos that we forget to observe and use our senses to feel...

like going to the eiffel tower, and being distracted by all the wow, that we overlook a person sitting in a corner that would make a wonderful photo...
 

Octarine

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Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,541
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Pasir Ris
#19
how come sounds like naruto trying to learn the sage mode ar?? :confused:
Not sure what / who naruto is .. but it has helped me in a lot of situations: don't run for opportunities, let them come to you. Sit down, watch .. have patience .. and you will see how people come closer and forget your camera. Standing tall with a big camera will get you attention from those eying at your equipment. Others will just try to avoid you.
Simple example: try to take pictures of kids from your 'adult eye level' .. or kneel down.
 

sfoto100

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2009
2,092
0
36
#20
1) experiment

2) look at good pictures

3) read up on photographic books, read up on compositional theory. have an open mind, and don't be too rigid with the so-called "rules" of photography.

4) move around, most people don't move around... shoot at eye level, shoot at the safest and most convenient spot, this is the reason for most bad compositions.

5) pay attention to every detail, take constant care to ensure that what you don't want to be in is out, that what you want in is in.

6) always think before you take a shot - what is bad about it, what is good about it - is the good enough to overlook the bad, since there is no perfect picture? this is the most important process, this is where you learn the most. try to figure out why your picture might be good, why it might be bad. when you can look at any picture and quickly point out a few problems and merits of it off the top of your head... that is when you know what you are doing. what you want to do. what you will do.

6) think about the light, photographic results are not what you see in real life

7) be your worst judge, demand more from yourself, and never be content with what you get

no one can help you with composition, the best person to help you is yourself. whether you wish to make the effort, or are just happy enough with proclaiming that the composition is sound (as some people in here end up doing).... really depends on one person...

YOU.
very good advice .. but how can this good advice come from a goat.... ;p haha.. it must be from wk! ;p

tks alot wk!
 

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