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The_Flash

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Jan 10, 2005
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#1
hi .. i have 2 filters .. a circular polarizer and a uv filter... my question is ... which filter first? (which filter near to cam and which filter on the "outside"
 

rebbot

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2005
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#2
dun stack them ;) use either one at any one time
 

#3
well depends on yer preference acutally, it also depends on wat brand the filters are, some brands are somewhat thicker den others. so stacking is not recommended.
for me both filters are hoya, and i dunmind stacking them up when i shoot. but i always take out the circular pl after use. (uv filter always stays on)
hope dat helps
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#4
If possible, use one filter at a time, stacking filters will degrade the image quality in theory.

But the UV filter is always on the lens for protection, so you can just mount the Cir PL filter on the UV filter.

Btw, I presume you will only use Cir PL filter only needed, not always mounted on lens.

Hope this help.
 

The_Flash

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Jan 10, 2005
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#5
i'm using both hoya .. ok i get it .. so uv always on .. pl on stacked on top when needed ... oh ya another question .. those using hoya cl pl or ... the thing that can turn turn 1 is for wad?
 

catchlights

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#6
The_Flash said:
i'm using both hoya .. ok i get it .. so uv always on .. pl on stacked on top when needed ... oh ya another question .. those using hoya cl pl or ... the thing that can turn turn 1 is for wad?

please do a google search about the proper use of Cir PL filter......
 

LittleWolf

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Jan 23, 2005
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#7
The_Flash said:
i'm using both hoya .. ok i get it .. so uv always on .. pl on stacked on top when needed ... oh ya another question .. those using hoya cl pl or ... the thing that can turn turn 1 is for wad?
This issue was investigated recently by several teams at a major research institution. Here's what they found:

Physics department: The filter works by filtering out light particles (photons), just like a coffee filter filters out coffee grounds. Over time, the photons will clog up the filter. By wiggling the rotary part of the filter back and forth, you shake out the photons of the filter's pores, and it is nearly as good as new again. (This is also the reason why you stack the polarizer filter on top of other filters: it prevents contamination of other glass surfaces by the photon dust that falls off.)

Arts department: By rotating the filter to an orientation different from anybody else, you can demonstrate your creativity, individuality, and ability to think out of the box.

Geography/earth sciences department: You turn the polarizer to compensate for the rotation of the earth. At the north pole, you turn the filter clockwise once every 24 hours; at the south pole, you turn it counter-clock wise. The closer you get to the equator, the slower you have to turn it.

Philosophy department: The filter doesn't rotate, that is only an illusion. In fact, the filter itself is an illusion.

Medicine department: Turning our special filter (available now for only S$299) has been shown to help lose weight.

Photography department: Don't miss the 15th intake of our "Basic Polarizer" module. For only S$280, you will also get a certificate.

Social studies: Any other polarizer users who want to join me for an outing? How about starting a PolarGraphers polarizer user's group?

Marketing department: The rotating part of the filter is a winch, used to pull out money from the pockets of "also must have" consumers who buy expensive equipment without knowing what it is and whether they have any use for it.
 

Mar 22, 2005
434
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#8
catchlights said:
If possible, use one filter at a time, stacking filters will degrade the image quality in theory.

But the UV filter is always on the lens for protection, so you can just mount the Cir PL filter on the UV filter.

Btw, I presume you will only use Cir PL filter only needed, not always mounted on lens.

Hope this help.
No. stacking filters doesnt necessarily degrade image quality. Even if it does, it is not visible to the ccd/cmos unless there is a foreign in one of the filters. I have been a keen filter user stacking up to 4 filters at one time and i dun realize any image deteioration. The only MAIN problem that I face is some vignetting at 18-24mm (*1.5 FOV Picture Angle),
 

Mar 22, 2005
434
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#9
The_Flash said:
hi .. i have 2 filters .. a circular polarizer and a uv filter... my question is ... which filter first? (which filter near to cam and which filter on the "outside"
If you treat your lens with paranoid care, it is alright to leave to filters there. I suggest uv to the camera, then pl. This is because you might face problems screwing the uv out of the pl with you put the pl first. This is just my opinion but i also usually dun use both at the same time as I fear vignetting. :cry:
 

Mar 22, 2005
434
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16
#10
The_Flash said:
i'm using both hoya .. ok i get it .. so uv always on .. pl on stacked on top when needed ... oh ya another question .. those using hoya cl pl or ... the thing that can turn turn 1 is for wad?
The ring on the pl is to "tune" it to cut down reflections from which angle. Look in your viewfinder and turn it until you find it "correct". Another alternative is to find the sun and use the lone on the pl as a guide to cut down reflections from that angle (the sun)
 

Mar 22, 2005
434
0
16
#11
LittleWolf said:
This issue was investigated recently by several teams at a major research institution. Here's what they found:

Physics department: The filter works by filtering out light particles (photons), just like a coffee filter filters out coffee grounds. Over time, the photons will clog up the filter. By wiggling the rotary part of the filter back and forth, you shake out the photons of the filter's pores, and it is nearly as good as new again. (This is also the reason why you stack the polarizer filter on top of other filters: it prevents contamination of other glass surfaces by the photon dust that falls off.)
...
Marketing department: The rotating part of the filter is a winch, used to pull out money from the pockets of "also must have" consumers who buy expensive equipment without knowing what it is and whether they have any use for it.
Good one. :D
 

Sukoo

New Member
Apr 9, 2004
503
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#12
:bsmilie: :bsmilie: :thumbsup:


LittleWolf said:
This issue was investigated recently by several teams at a major research institution. Here's what they found:

Physics department: The filter works by filtering out light particles (photons), just like a coffee filter filters out coffee grounds. Over time, the photons will clog up the filter. By wiggling the rotary part of the filter back and forth, you shake out the photons of the filter's pores, and it is nearly as good as new again. (This is also the reason why you stack the polarizer filter on top of other filters: it prevents contamination of other glass surfaces by the photon dust that falls off.)

Arts department: By rotating the filter to an orientation different from anybody else, you can demonstrate your creativity, individuality, and ability to think out of the box.

Geography/earth sciences department: You turn the polarizer to compensate for the rotation of the earth. At the north pole, you turn the filter clockwise once every 24 hours; at the south pole, you turn it counter-clock wise. The closer you get to the equator, the slower you have to turn it.

Philosophy department: The filter doesn't rotate, that is only an illusion. In fact, the filter itself is an illusion.

Medicine department: Turning our special filter (available now for only S$299) has been shown to help lose weight.

Photography department: Don't miss the 15th intake of our "Basic Polarizer" module. For only S$280, you will also get a certificate.

Social studies: Any other polarizer users who want to join me for an outing? How about starting a PolarGraphers polarizer user's group?

Marketing department: The rotating part of the filter is a winch, used to pull out money from the pockets of "also must have" consumers who buy expensive equipment without knowing what it is and whether they have any use for it.
 

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