Filters to use


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hedger

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#1
As of now, I only have the kit lense and 40-150mm for the e300. Wondering what kind of uv filters to buy for them? Care to share?
 

nightpiper

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Oct 20, 2003
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i think the cheaper alternative is the Hoya HMC UV filter or higher grade. if can afford, go for the B+W brand.
 

bariq

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#5
hedger said:
As of now, I only have the kit lense and 40-150mm for the e300. Wondering what kind of uv filters to buy for them? Care to share?
I say go for hoya pro series filters, expensive but :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

bariq

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#6
hedger said:
As of now, I only have the kit lense and 40-150mm for the e300. Wondering what kind of uv filters to buy for them? Care to share?

I say you buy 2 neutral skilight filter for your kit and 150mm lens. These filters can be left on the lens on all times and serves as general protection for the lens.

Buy one UV filter if you are keen on it, as both ur lens are 58mm you can interchange the filter.
 

kktan

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#8
NMSS_2 said:
get at least a B+W or hoya HMC uv filter. ask the retailer to show you the difference between normal hoya and the HMC or B+W type, you be amazed at the difference.
Any ideal what is the price different for the HMC UV filter (d58mm) between Hoya and B+W? :)
 

bariq

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#9
kktan said:
Any ideal what is the price different for the HMC UV filter (d58mm) between Hoya and B+W? :)
hoya hmc will be cheaper by 15-18 sgd compared to b+w. Hoya pro is around the same or more exp.
 

kktan

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#10
bariq said:
hoya hmc will be cheaper by 15-18 sgd compared to b+w. Hoya pro is around the same or more exp.
Since not that much diff in $, must try them all at the store before buying. :D
 

chancy

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#11
hedger said:
As of now, I only have the kit lense and 40-150mm for the e300. Wondering what kind of uv filters to buy for them? Care to share?
Hello Hedger,

If I may offer an alternate view. For myself, other than filters for use with monochrome film (Yellow, Orange, Red), I leave non mounted on my lenses. For protection (partial), that job goes to the lens cap & the hood. While this isn't foolproof, for subjects such as still life, candid or portrait, there's little need for UV filters, lest you take photos at high altitudes.

Modern lenses have coatings that are hard wearing, it's alright to clean them as & when needed.

As with most advice, your requirements drive your purchases :)

Cheers,
 

tao

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Jan 7, 2005
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#12
NMSS_2 said:
get at least a B+W or hoya HMC uv filter. ask the retailer to show you the difference between normal hoya and the HMC or B+W type, you be amazed at the difference.
may I know what exactly is the kind of difference we are talking about here?

and if we compare between normal filter, HMC/B+W filter and NO filter, which will give you the best results in outdoor daylight shooting?
 

#13
tao said:
may I know what exactly is the kind of difference we are talking about here?

and if we compare between normal filter, HMC/B+W filter and NO filter, which will give you the best results in outdoor daylight shooting?
no filter of course is the best but........ with the risk of getting stain, fingerprint, dust ......on your precious lens.

HMC & B+W are multi-coated. it is a lot clearer than the normal hoya uv filter.

asked retailer for different filter type to put on your lens for better demonstration.
 

tao

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Jan 7, 2005
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#14
thanks for the info.

but what abt those Hoya adverts that claims the HMC UV filter improves image contrast, blah, blah blah? fact or myth?
 

chii

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#15
tao said:
thanks for the info.

but what abt those Hoya adverts that claims the HMC UV filter improves image contrast, blah, blah blah? fact or myth?
Most of what u hear about filters in general is true to a certain extent, as most marketing ppl would like to put their product in good light.

u can visit this webbie for a better picture .

http://medfmt.8k.com/bronfiltersp.html

cheers
chii
 

bariq

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#16
tao said:
thanks for the info.

but what abt those Hoya adverts that claims the HMC UV filter improves image contrast, blah, blah blah? fact or myth?

I say if its a myth the filters would have been phased off long back. Warming and polarizing filters do enhance the some colors in the visible spectrum. While multicoated lenses protect from internal reflections and flares. Thin filters are recommended for wide angle lenses. Filter factors are stated in X nummbers, the number indicates how many times more light you need to produce the same exposure you would get without the filter. So a 1x filter doesnt cut light, while a 2x cuts the light by two stops.

Every filters cuts some percentage of light no matter what, advertisement is part of drum banging n always include some hype. So ask the ppl who are using the filters and iam sure u wont regret following their advices.
 

ekchua

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#17
chancy said:
Hello Hedger,

If I may offer an alternate view. For myself, other than filters for use with monochrome film (Yellow, Orange, Red), I leave non mounted on my lenses. For protection (partial), that job goes to the lens cap & the hood. While this isn't foolproof, for subjects such as still life, candid or portrait, there's little need for UV filters, lest you take photos at high altitudes.

Modern lenses have coatings that are hard wearing, it's alright to clean them as & when needed.

As with most advice, your requirements drive your purchases :)

Cheers,
I share Chancy's alternate view. I use B+W MRC UV Haze filters and find them great. However of late, my preference is to go without them unless I shoot in more susceptible situations like at the beach or in rain. For proection, I find that the lens hood is sufficient in most situations. Going without the filter, I get at least 1/2 stop performance improvement which comes in handy in low light conditions.
 

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