Filters galore...


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yehosaphat

Senior Member
Oct 28, 2005
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#1
Hi everyone,

Can anyone explain what is the difference and purpose of these filters...

ND filter
Haze filter
Skylight filter
Polarising filter
 

Jul 17, 2005
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Clementi
#2
eh?

ND: to reduce light by a certain amount of stops depending on the ND value. e.g. ND4, ND8.

Haze: same as UV filter

Skylight: to slightly warm colours. 1A is a little pinkish, 1B is stronger.

Polariser: Circular polariser is to reduce reflection and to make blue skies bluer. basically it polarises the light.

this is just an overview la. do a google.
 

yehosaphat

Senior Member
Oct 28, 2005
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#3
Isaiahfortythirtyone said:
eh?

ND: to reduce light by a certain amount of stops depending on the ND value. e.g. ND4, ND8.

Haze: same as UV filter

Skylight: to slightly warm colours. 1A is a little pinkish, 1B is stronger.

Polariser: Circular polariser is to reduce reflection and to make blue skies bluer. basically it polarises the light.

this is just an overview la. do a google.
Hmm... thanks for your advise.

For ND, how do you choose what value to use?

For polariser, to make sky bluer, is there a trick to it? or just point n shoot?
 

ob1canob

New Member
May 30, 2005
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#4
yehosaphat said:
Hmm... thanks for your advise.

For ND, how do you choose what value to use?

For polariser, to make sky bluer, is there a trick to it? or just point n shoot?
Basically polariser doesn't make the sky bluer than it already is. The polariser just helps to cut down the glare (where light comes form various directions e.g. reflections) and only allow those light coming from determined direction (polarized the light going into your lense and camera); hence it reduces the amount of light and therefore have the effect of darkening (sometimes one have to increase exposure to compensate). The brighter objects, e.g. the blue sky, will be more prominently affected and hence the blue will appear bluer. If you use a circular polarising filter you just need to point and shoot; otherwise, you will have to adjust your polarising angle (by turning the filter) to get the correct amount of polarisation you want.
 

Firefox

New Member
Feb 15, 2004
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Bedok
#5
ob1canob said:
If you use a circular polarising filter you just need to point and shoot; otherwise, you will have to adjust your polarising angle (by turning the filter) to get the correct amount of polarisation you want.

Not true!

You still need to turn the filter even if it's a Circular Polariser.

The difference between Circular and Linear Polarisers is that some Auto-focus systems have problems when used with Linear Polarisers. Therefore, there is a need for circular polarisers for such cameras so that the AF can work.
It doesn't mean that Circular Polarisers cut-down on reflections from all angles, you still need to turn the filter to get the correct amount of polarisation.
 

Dec 11, 2005
113
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Singapore
#8
foxtwo said:
filters of all kinds have been explained, discussed and argued in past threads. pls do a search either in CS or google. Let me give you a few freebies

http://www.nelsontan.com/articles/filters.html
http://www.thkphoto.com/products/hoya/index.html
http://medfmt.8k.com/bronfiltersp.html

Hi ,

I am interested to buy a UV (0) filter just to protect the lens from my Nikon D50. How much would be a reasonable price to pay for an HOYA brand?

Thanks
WL
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#9
WILLIAM2000 said:
Hi ,

I am interested to buy a UV (0) filter just to protect the lens from my Nikon D50. How much would be a reasonable price to pay for an HOYA brand?

Thanks
WL

Not more than 30SGD...

Look in the buy and sell, there are lots of filters for sale.
 

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