Filter or no filter?


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Phosphorus

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Jan 13, 2009
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#1
Hi all I'm new here

heard some people saying that shooting with no filters gives a more "pure" image in terms of color and stuff.
Does a filter really affect ur photos?
and what are the different types of filters ?and the difference they have??
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
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#2
Hi all I'm new here

heard some people saying that shooting with no filters gives a more "pure" image in terms of color and stuff.
Does a filter really affect ur photos?
and what are the different types of filters ?and the difference they have??
The lens IQ is as good as its own glass elements. Adding more unnecessary glass in front will naturally, not so visibly degrade the IQ. Not all are unnecessary, use them judiciously. And not all people are so nity about the percieved drop in IQ. But some cheaper glass might just add more problems than others.

What types of filters ?
There are many many photographic filters.
Here is a write up by cambridge in color http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-lens-filters.htm
There are probably many more online sites with other esoteric filters to fill u up :)

Happy reading

Ryan
 

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Abuddlah

New Member
Sep 2, 2008
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#3
i put a cheap fliter to protect my lens
 

#4
Hi all I'm new here

heard some people saying that shooting with no filters gives a more "pure" image in terms of color and stuff.
Does a filter really affect ur photos?
and what are the different types of filters ?and the difference they have??
If you get a top quality filter such as the Nikon, B+W or Hoya (Digital Pro) filters, there will not be any noticeable differences, unless you really pixel peep to the nth degree.

To protect against accidents, i.e. scratches to the front elements of your lenses, a UV or clear type of filter is recommended.

If you are willing to splurge the money, just get the B+W MRC UV or Clear filters. It is simply the best! :thumbsup:
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#5
heard some people saying that shooting with no filters gives a more "pure" image in terms of color and stuff. Does a filter really affect ur photos?
First of all read the link provided about filters which are necessary in certain conditions. CPL, ND and GND cannot be done via Photoshop, you must use them in the moment you take the picture. Other filters can either be added later in Photoshop (colour filters) or they are just redundant (UV). UV protection is not necessary for digital cameras. The lenses filter UV already and the sensors also have a filter. No point adding useless glass which creates problems like flare and ghosting under certain conditions.
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/sm-feb-05.shtml
http://toothwalker.org/optics/flare.html
If you need protection for a peace of mind then get lens hoods. Helps much better. Use filters only when you really need them, e.g. to prevent water splash or dirt.
 

Phosphorus

New Member
Jan 13, 2009
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#6
Thanks a lot for all the links and stuff :D
tho wads IQ of lens?
 

Feb 3, 2009
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www.photo-wizard.net
#7
With all the photo editing tools available today - is it really neccessary to use a filter these days? I'm curious what others think.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#8
With all the photo editing tools available today - is it really neccessary to use a filter these days? I'm curious what others think.
You cannot emulate all kinds of filters, e.g.
CPL - because you need to filter the light the moment you capture it. What you don't capture is gone, the whitish stray light of unfiltered sky will ruin landscapes.
ND - No PS can emulate long term exposure and the related effects. Closing down aperture too far will cause diffraction (well visible beyond f/16 on cropped sensor). So if you want shallow DOF you need to open the aperture which will require a fast shutter - if you don't use any ND. Famous here is the ND400 which gives you several seconds shutter speed at daylight with great effects, like the silky image of a waterfall taken at 1/2s and longer.
GND - The partial darkening of image areas is to limit the dynamic range of the picture. This is essential when you have bright and dark areas close together, e.g. sunset, sunrise. Digital sensors have a lower dynamic range than the eye. What is blown out due to overexposure cannot be rescued later. The data for the details are lost.
As you see, these filters are essential and cannot be replicated by any Photoshop.
 

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