Filter for portraits shot


Status
Not open for further replies.

KNIGHT ONG

Senior Member
Dec 18, 2003
5,792
1
38
PAKISTAN
www.pbase.com
#2
Many filters for you to choose under different conditions .. mostly soft filter to tone down the sharpness ... :sweat:

It depends on what you want .. :)
 

denniskee

Senior Member
Oct 26, 2003
5,468
2
0
bukit batok
Visit site
#4
Normally we say shooting @ wide open is soft, or that the consumer lens are typically soft. How is this softness compare to soft filter.
 

student

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2004
3,078
0
0
#5
"Softness" geneerally means "not sharp".

When one use a soft filter, the entire picture is made a little "hazy" with less harsh lines, which ladies may prefer, if I am allow to make cliches statements. However such softness may not be desirable when photography fishermen with all the "wonderful" lines.

Regarding "softness" in lenses used wide open - the image should be sharp where it should be, and out of focus when it is desired to be soft or out of focus. For example, in using a 80mm f1.4 lens wide open, one should be able to count all the eyelashes, yet the ears out of focus, giving an illusion of depth in a two-demsional image. This image is technically not "soft", but parts are rendered out of focus for esthetic reasons.

When a lens is called "soft" we may be talking about a poor quality lens which do not focus well, resulting in nothing in focus.

Coming back to the original question - what filters for portrait. The question I will ask is this. Are you making black & white portraits, or colored. Film or digital. Without more information, any answers will not be properly directed.
 

denniskee

Senior Member
Oct 26, 2003
5,468
2
0
bukit batok
Visit site
#6
hi student

i agree with what you say for the wide open.

how about the softness from consumer lens, ie it has lower resolution than pro level lens? is it the same as the effect one gets with soft filter?
 

canturn

Senior Member
Sep 29, 2002
2,641
0
0
East, SG
www.lyricalmoments.com
#7
Not to mention yellow-green , yellow or green filter for portrait if you're shooting b&w film.

I personally find yellow-green gives the glow to skin tone esp when using HP5 film.

Since you didn't mention whether it's for digital or film, hehe
 

student

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2004
3,078
0
0
#8
denniskee said:
hi student

i agree with what you say for the wide open.

how about the softness from consumer lens, ie it has lower resolution than pro level lens? is it the same as the effect one gets with soft filter?
I am afraid that I unable to give an intelligent answer to your question directly regarding softness in such lenses. I think the problems are more than just softness.

If you are thinking of using the consumer lenses as "soft-focus" lenses, I would advise not. The problems with poor lenses are not just sharpness, but contrast, color fringing and things like these.

Some more knowledgeable members may give better technical explamnations.
 

canturn

Senior Member
Sep 29, 2002
2,641
0
0
East, SG
www.lyricalmoments.com
#9
One more filter, ND filter if you're thinking of shooting wide open in bright daylight and it goes beyond what your cam's shutter speed can cope... e.g. if you want to shoot f1.2, ISO 100 in broaddaylight, you'll need shutter speed of 1/6400s.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom