Film queries - set wrong ASA value


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huggable

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#1
I finished a roll of ASA200 film, and changed to a ASA400 film in a hurry, and forgot to change the ASA setting on the camera to 400. Taken a few shots before realising it.

In this case, is it better to shoot the entire roll at ASA200, and tell the photo shop to do the necessary (something to do with pushing), or change the camera ASA setting to 400, and end up with the first few shots overexposed? If I change the ASA to 400, can the first few shots be salvaged?

I'm using a Nikon FE, with centre-weighted metering. Would like to get some advise.

Thanks and Merry Christmas!
 

sORe-EyEz

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Jun 28, 2005
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#2
better dun change the ASA, shops should be able to push or pull the film by that 1 stop or abit more. unless u can reshoot those previously ruined.

:)
 

sweat100

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#4
I dont think you need to worry at all and just continue to shoot all at ASA200. This is because you are overexposing your film by 1 stop then it wouldn't matter. Infact, the film latitude is so wide that 1 stop is ok. You even have greater shadow details by overexposing.

If you really want, you should pull your film, no push. This is because the camera think you have a less sensitive film. So it will meter 1 stop more as though you have a ASA 200 film inside.
 

sweat100

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#5
I am also assuming you are shooting with negatives (B&W, Colour), not slides. Slides are abit tricky in that aspect. You need to expose correctly for slides.
 

IamJeFfy

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#6
1 stop doesn't hurt unless you're shooting slides.. so no worries.
 

huggable

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#7
Thanks for all the advise! I've left the camera setting at ASA200, will just let the shop process normally, see what happens. If results are good, I'd probably do the same for future rolls of film.

I'm using color negative film, non-slide film.

I dont think you need to worry at all and just continue to shoot all at ASA200. This is because you are overexposing your film by 1 stop then it wouldn't matter. Infact, the film latitude is so wide that 1 stop is ok. You even have greater shadow details by overexposing.

If you really want, you should pull your film, no push. This is because the camera think you have a less sensitive film. So it will meter 1 stop more as though you have a ASA 200 film inside.
 

huggable

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#8
I didn't give the photo shop any special instructions. Got back the pictures, apparently, there is no noticable difference for the roll of ASA400 film shot at camera setting of ASA200.

In fact, I thought the pictures looked very well exposed! Was initially worried about over-exposed pictures. Great to know the tolerance of film negative is so good!
 

huggable

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#10
On a manual camera, using ASA400 film, setting the ASA to 200 is the same as setting the exposure compensation to +1 right?

Just wanting to get some facts right. Thinking of shooting another roll of film at +1 since there is better shadow details. As long as the shutter speed is fast enough.
 

sweat100

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#11
On a manual camera, using ASA400 film, setting the ASA to 200 is the same as setting the exposure compensation to +1 right?

Just wanting to get some facts right. Thinking of shooting another roll of film at +1 since there is better shadow details. As long as the shutter speed is fast enough.
Yes it is the same as +1 if you set it to meter at ASA 400 with a 400 film.
 

catchlights

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#13
negative film have larger exposure latitude, so usually photographers will overexpose negative film by one full stop, so able to get better shadow details, and still able to preserve highlight details. beside, the color will be more saturated.

if the negative is underexposed, you will able to get print out from the negative, but with mute or off color, and noticeable grain in the shadow areas.

I use to set compensation to plus one on my F90X and F80, it will meter and expose the film over by one stop, since it the camera is able to read the film speed by DX code, so I need not worry about what speed of negative film I loaded into camera.

btw, for C41 processing, usually lab won't offer push or pull processing service.
 

huggable

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#14
Thanks! Just got a few boxes of Superia 200, will try with overexpose by 1 stop.
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#15
Thanks! Just got a few boxes of Superia 200, will try with overexpose by 1 stop.
When you overexpose negatives, you will get a slightly increased contrast with highlights slightly washed out. Best to overexposed by about 1/2 stop when shooting prints because negatives can tolerate overexposure better but try not to overdo it.. Needless to say, you'll lose highlight details because it will all be 'blacked out' on the negative which can become more difficult to reproduce during printing. You do get a highlight compression effect if you do it correctly.

If you accidentally overexposed negs like you did, then it's fine and continue to shoot normally and then correct during printing. If you have underexposed, then you should underexposed the entire roll and go for push processing for the entire roll.

If you had shot slides, you might want to underexpose by 1/2 stop to preserve highlight colour details instead. 1 stop under for slides will make them relatively darker and lacking contrast during projection.

Oh and BTW, if you shoot Superia Reala or professional negs like Kodak Portra or Fujicolor Pro, then it's best to corectly expose for the widest tonal range.
 

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huggable

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#16
Thanks for the advice. My camera can set EV compensation in 1/2 stops, so I'd set to +1/2 EV and see the effects.

Will take note of the characteristics of the different film series when I get to use them. Will check out with the photo shop if they do pushing/pulling too. Just have a feeling that they don't. :think:
 

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