Few questions about FILTERS.. HELP PLS


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Jun 17, 2006
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#1
Hi everyone,

Just want to get some knowledge about lens' filters;

- What kind of filters should I get to start off? From what i read, UV filters is a "should get", right?
- How do I know which filter size (mm) will fit my lens?
- What other aspects should I also look out for when getting a filter?
- Any brands to recommend?

Do feel free to share with me your POV! Thanks in advance :D
 

Redsun

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Nov 27, 2005
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#2
Hi basically a filter is used to protect your lens.A UV filter is fine to protect your front element in case you drop your lens.You can find out the filter size by removing your lens cap.The filter thread size can be seen on the back of the cap.As for other filters,there're lots of them like polarizers,ND filters and so on.All have them have different uses.
 

Apr 4, 2007
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#3
- What kind of filters should I get to start off? From what i read, UV filters is a "should get", right?
IMHO CPLs, GNDs, NDs. besides blocking of UV, ppl generally keep UV filters on the lens to protect the front element and i guess generally cuz basic UV filters are cheap.

http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam/User-Guide/filter/filter-UV.html

-How do I know which filter size (mm) will fit my lens?
the screw on filter size is the thread size of your lens, which is simply written on the opposite size of your default lens cap.
 

dw2chan

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Jul 2, 2007
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#5
Hi,

What filters you 'should' get all depends on what you like to shoot. Each filter has a different use and depending on what you shoot, a filter can be totally useless to you.

A quick run down of popular filters:
UV Filter:
generally unless you're at high altitudes...this filter does nothing but protects the front of your lens. Depending on the quality of the filter...you may or may not see a drop in image quality and/or an increase in shutter speed.

Circular Polarizers:
basically these filters make skies more blue and can cut out some reflections (ie on water, glass etc). Useful for landscape photography.

Neutral Density:
these filters decrease the amount of light let in without changing the colours. generally used for increasing shutter speed on bright days (ie shooting a waterfall)

Graduated Neutral Density:
these filters are like NDs but have a gradient. So for example the top half will block light while the bottom half doesnt. these are used for shooting sunrises, sunsets....stuff like that


it's better to google this...there are plenty of writeups with images and stuff that will explain things better.

as for brands. I prefer B+W and then hoya.
 

blueskye168

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2006
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#6
Hi,

What filters you 'should' get all depends on what you like to shoot. Each filter has a different use and depending on what you shoot, a filter can be totally useless to you.

A quick run down of popular filters:
UV Filter:
generally unless you're at high altitudes...this filter does nothing but protects the front of your lens. Depending on the quality of the filter...you may or may not see a drop in image quality and/or an increase in shutter speed.

Circular Polarizers:
basically these filters make skies more blue and can cut out some reflections (ie on water, glass etc). Useful for landscape photography.

Neutral Density:
these filters decrease the amount of light let in without changing the colours. generally used for increasing shutter speed on bright days (ie shooting a waterfall)

Graduated Neutral Density:
these filters are like NDs but have a gradient. So for example the top half will block light while the bottom half doesnt. these are used for shooting sunrises, sunsets....stuff like that


it's better to google this...there are plenty of writeups with images and stuff that will explain things better.

as for brands. I prefer B+W and then hoya.
yes, :thumbsup:(as above mentioned). Plus, I'm using a B+W Skylight filter-72mm for outdoor sceneries and under shades(cloudy as well) where I find most of the time under this circumstances there's a colour-cast ranging from slight blue to a more pronounced ones, may or not depends on your preference;)
 

sanjayc

New Member
Feb 18, 2007
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#7
Hi,
I have a UV filter, Circular Polariser. If you are goin to shoot black and white, u will need more filters.

U may also need a skylight filter. went on a photo trip and got a blue cast at high altitude (mountains) in sky inspite of using uv
 

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