Eye resolution


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eadwine

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#2
50mm ?? haha

i would say/think u cannot really define it man.
our eyes are super fast to focus, this shows u how fast our brain is reacting too..
 

beachbum

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#3
hhmmmm..

i think human eyes' vision is like:
perspective of 35mm lens, with angle of view like that of a panaromic camera and with DOF of 35mm@F2.8 - F4.

what does everyone think??
 

#4
Originally posted by beachbum
hhmmmm..

i think human eyes' vision is like:
perspective of 35mm lens, with angle of view like that of a panaromic camera and with DOF of 35mm@F2.8 - F4.

what does everyone think??
I think I need to look at green more often.

I have 4 eyes, so I think my perpective has some vignetting at the edges where my glass can't cover.... :bsmilie:
 

ckiang

Senior Member
#5
Originally posted by maddog
What is the resolution and colour depth of the human eye? Anyone knows?
Our eyes have:

1. Magnification of a 50mm lens
2. Field of view wider than a 17mm lens
3. No or very little distortion at wide angle.
4. Almost infinite DoF.
5. Perfect "Auto White Balance" (thanks to the brain also)
6. Very high contrast range (unlike film and digital)
7. Very sensitive, can see in the dark where even non-assisted AF fails.
8. Can eventually act as a good lightmeter. :)

Regards
CK
 

ninelives

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#6
9: will have fungus too, but water or tissue can clean it.
10 : angle of view is 180 degree to be exact.
11: will become blurer when older.
 

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#7
12: is the most expensive lens (whatever system, whichever bozooka lens) you have, no need to switch eyes for macro or telephoto, only need a pair of diopter when focusing is inpaired.
 

ark19

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#9
14. Self-cleaning lenses, no need to use Lenspen.
 

Klause

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#10
Originally posted by revenant
13. Not able to blur background :D
Actually can blur one. Just concentrate on one item in front of you, u can see it's background is blured.
 

roygoh

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#12
Originally posted by ckiang


Our eyes have:

1. Magnification of a 50mm lens
2. Field of view wider than a 17mm lens
3. No or very little distortion at wide angle.
4. Almost infinite DoF.
5. Perfect "Auto White Balance" (thanks to the brain also)
6. Very high contrast range (unlike film and digital)
7. Very sensitive, can see in the dark where even non-assisted AF fails.
8. Can eventually act as a good lightmeter. :)

Regards
CK
Don't quite agree about number 4 - almost infinite DoF. If that's the case then there will not be short-sightedness already ;)
 

denizenx

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#14
haha 7 also.. some ppl have higher ISO noise than others... nightblindness... but I believe the eye is more like a videocam... around 72-76Hz refresh... that's why can see in darkness after adjusting...

and it's not auto white balance.. more like bochup white balance... if u bother can see the colour casts...

then got perm-mount lens hood with flare/glare adjustment hahahahaha
 

Jed

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#16
Eh... ninelives, your vision 180 degrees ah?

Seriously, it's approximately 140 degrees.
 

Ian

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#17
Originally posted by maddog
What is the resolution and colour depth of the human eye? Anyone knows?
A 'standard' human eye can differentiate about 69 line pairs per mm at a distance of about 20cm.

In terms of colour depth, about 10 million shades is average which equates to a bit depth of about 23.3 so 24 bit colour is around 6.7 million shades more than a standard human eye can differentiate.

note: a 'standard' eye is a mathematical model of the average human eye. Some people will see more shades than others, some less etc.
 

Ian

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Feb 20, 2002
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#18
Originally posted by denizenx
haha 7 also.. some ppl have higher ISO noise than others... nightblindness... but I believe the eye is more like a videocam... around 72-76Hz refresh... that's why can see in darkness after adjusting...

then got perm-mount lens hood with flare/glare adjustment hahahahaha
Hate to do this but here goes.

The human eye is optimised for vision around sunrise and sunset, it's pretty poor at night and the sensitivity of the human eye at night is largely influenced by the age of the person. As you get older your maximum exit pupil (dilation of the pupil) reduces from around 7mm by around 1mm per decade once over the age of 20.

The reduction of the size of the dilated pupil (at night) means that as you get older your eyesight dims, this is also the case with night vision.

The reason for the acclimatisation period (around 30 minutes on average) for the human eye to dark adapt is that that is how long it takes for the 'rods' in the human eye to reach maximum sensitivity for night vision. It should be noted that rods are not sensitive to red light, which is why red lighting is used at night by astronomers, pilots and others who have to keep their dark adapted vision intact while reading instruments, maps etc.

In frames per second the human eye is no where near 72 frames as you indicate, it's less than 24 frames per second, otherwise motion pictures wouldn't appear to be fluid motion, nor TV at 25-30 frames per second equivalent etc.
 

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